Year 7 Identity

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  • Use the ‘First ceramics lesson’ in the Autumn 2011 folder in the project folder in Art Resources (MLE).
    The aim is to allow students to interact with the clay and make a thumb pot. If these can be kept moist students can impress the objects they bring in later on to see how effecive they are.
    Understanding can be assessed using the clay jeopardy game. (same folder as the one mentionned above.)
  • This may take two lessons to do it really well. You could start the second lesson by students demonstrating the technique to the rest of the class.
    Play the clay jeopardy for AfL. Or test them on the words in the glossary.
  • This may take two lessons to do it really well. You could start the second lesson for this by students demonstrating the technique to the rest of the class.
    Play the clay jeopardy for AfL.
  • This may take two lessons to do it really well. You could start the second lesson by students demonstrating the technique to the rest of the class.
    Play the clay jeopardy for AfL.
    If you feel you have too many groups to do two slabs just do one. You could try this idea from art attack. However, because of the nature of it it couldn’t then be part of the permanent wall display outside: http://teapot3.multiply.com/video/item/1/art_attack-_making_clay_faces
  • Zek’s presentation in the Autumn folder: ‘Why draw’ is a really good discussion starting point.
  • 2.1
  • 2.4
  • 2.5
  • 2.7
  • Zek’s presentation in the Autumn folder: ‘Why draw’ is a really good discussion starting point.
  • Zek’s presentation in the Autumn folder: ‘Why draw’ is a really good discussion starting point.
  • Year 7 Identity

    1. 1. SoW: Identity(Year 7) During this project you will explore your identity and create images that reflect ideas about yourself, working from observation, memory and imagination. You will improve your use of graphite and chalk pastels and develop an understanding of proportion. You will also discover the potential of clay and produce a glazed, self portrait, ceramic tile. You will learn about the ideas, methods and approaches used by other artists who have created portraits. You will also investigate artists who use symbolism within their work to tell us more about the people they are painting.
    2. 2. Part 1: Clay tile Step1: Introduction to clay Learning objectives. By the end of the lesson you will: Develop an understanding of the properties and potential of clay. Use the correct words to describe clay techniques and processes. Learning outcomes. By the end of the lesson you will: Have created a thumb pot showing your understanding of techniques. Glossary: Clay Wedge Leatherhard Greenware Firing Bisque Kiln Glaze moist earth of decomposed rock technique to take the air out of clay. unfired clay not quite dry but firm enough to carve. dried out, unfired clay. baking clay at a high temperature. clay after first firing. furnace that fires the clay. finely ground mineral solution, turns to glass when fired
    3. 3. Preparing your clay for sculpting Wedging removes air pockets
    4. 4. Modeling clay into a pinch pot. Start with a ball. Push thumb into centre. Pinch from bottom upward. Shape and smooth for finished pot.
    5. 5. Step 2: Create two slabs Learning objectives. By the end of the lesson you will be able to roll out a clay slab and explain the process to a peer using the correct words. Learning outcomes. By the end of two lessons you will have created two clay slabs. Glossary: Clay Wedge Slab Leatherhard Greenware Firing Bisque Kiln Glaze moist earth of decomposed rock technique to take the air out of clay. a piece of clay that has been rolled out to a specific thickness. unfired clay not quite dry but firm enough to carve. dried out, unfired clay. baking clay at a high temperature. clay after first firing. furnace that fires the clay. finely ground mineral solution, turns to glass when fired
    6. 6. Creating a slab. Flatten the clay a little to start you off. Roll out a slab using the guides to control the thickness of the clay. Use the sharp knife to cut around the template. Initial your tile discreetly.
    7. 7. Collecting homework Due: next Art lesson Bring objects to impress into the clay slabs. Objects should reflect something about your hobbies and interests. Choose objects with an interesting texture. Please do not bring anything too valuable, inappropriate or too big.
    8. 8. Step 3: Creating a self portrait in clay Learning objectives. By the end of the lesson you will: Develop your control of manipulating and cutting clay accurately. Be able to explain the process of transferring an image to clay using the correct vocabulary. Learning outcomes. By the end of the two lessons you will have transferred an image of you to one of your clay slabs. The face will be clear and recognisable as you. Glossary: Clay Wedge Slab Leatherhard Greenware Firing Bisque Kiln Glaze moist earth of decomposed rock technique to take the air out of clay. a piece of clay that has been rolled out to a specific thickness. unfired clay not quite dry but firm enough to carve. dried out, unfired clay. baking clay at a high temperature. clay after first firing. furnace that fires the clay. finely ground mineral solution, turns to glass when fired
    9. 9. Step 4: Decorating your clay tiles and create your layered portrait. Learning objectives. By the end of the lesson you will: Be able to construct strong composition and understand how to use symmetry, balance and pattern to your advantage. Use your understanding of Lucinda Mudge’s work to influence the marks you use in decorating your tile Understand the potential of different tools and objects in creating an effective impressions into the clay. Learning outcomes. By the end of the lesson you will have: Created a patterned clay slab using impressing, moulding and embossing techniques. Used the score and slip technique to join together the two decorated, slabs of clay. Glossary: Clay Wedge Slab Leatherhard Greenware Glaze moist earth of decomposed rock technique to take the air out of clay. a piece of clay that has been rolled out to a specific thickness. unfired clay not quite dry but firm enough to carve. dried out, unfired clay. finely ground mineral solution, turns to glass when fired
    10. 10. Lucinda Mudge Mudge’s work pays homage to the Staffordshire slipware potters of the 17th century, and refers to the decorative arts. Her surfaces are richly textured with designs marked into the clay, which is then followed by the process of honey glazing that traditionally accompanies slip work.
    11. 11. Option 1: Water colour and white ready mix. Step 5: Painting your ceramic self portrait. Learning objectives. By the end of the lesson you will: Understand basic colour mixing and be able to mix your skin tone. Choose the most appropriate colours in terms of reflecting your own interests and creating a good balance. Learning outcomes. By the end of the lesson you will have painted your ceramic self portrait accurately and with colours that reflect something about your personality. Glossary: Clay Wedge Slab Leatherhard Greenware Firing Bisque Kiln Glaze moist earth of decomposed rock technique to take the air out of clay. a piece of clay that has been rolled out to a specific thickness. unfired clay not quite dry but firm enough to carve. dried out, unfired clay. baking clay at a high temperature. clay after first firing. furnace that fires the clay. finely ground mineral solution, turns to glass when fired
    12. 12. Option 2: With glaze. Step 5: Painting your ceramic self portrait. Learning objectives. By the end of the lesson you will: Understand how and why the colours of the glaze are altered when they are fired. Choose the most appropriate colours in terms of reflecting your own interests and creating a good balance on the tile. Learning outcomes. By the end of the lesson you will have painted your ceramic self portrait accurately and with colours that reflect something about your personality. Glossary: Clay Wedge Slab Leatherhard Greenware Firing Bisque Kiln Glaze moist earth of decomposed rock technique to take the air out of clay. a piece of clay that has been rolled out to a specific thickness. unfired clay not quite dry but firm enough to carve. dried out, unfired clay. baking clay at a high temperature. clay after first firing. furnace that fires the clay. finely ground mineral solution, turns to glass when fired
    13. 13. Jasna Sokolovic left her native Yugoslavia in 1994, venturing to Granville Island, Vancouver. She is inspired by as Gaudi and Hundertwasser. Her long journey is often portrayed symbolically with birds representing “fragility and liberty, taking off, falling down and covering distances.” Jasna Sokolovic
    14. 14. Part 2: Developing skills in 2D Step1: Introduction to drawing Learning objectives. By the end of the lesson you will: Develop an understanding of the purpose of drawing. Know what the formal elements are in art. Learning outcomes. By the end of the lesson you will show your understanding of the formal elements through a number of drawing exercises. Glossary: The formal elements: Cross hatching: Stippling: Tone: Burnishing: Line, Tone, Colour, Pattern, Texture, Shape, Form At least two layers of parallel lines. The line sin each later travel in different directions. Areas of tone created by dots or specks. The degree of lightness or darkness of an area Heavy layers of pencil creating a shiny surface
    15. 15. Why draw?
    16. 16. To Observe To Investigate Key Words: Look & see. To Contemplate To Remember Rami Efal “Tea” (2005) Pen on paper www.flickr.com/photos/aburami/sets/1509705/ Paul Brady “Will Smith” (2008) www.flickr.com/photos/pbradyartwork/ Elizabeth Kane “Diet Coke” (2008) Colouring Pencils www.flickr.com/photos/elizabethkane/
    17. 17. To Observe To Investigate Key Words: To observe or inquire into in detail; examine systematically. To Contemplate To Remember Ernst Haeckel “Kunstformen der Natur” (1899-1904) To see more click here Ben Lawson “Absence Makes the Heart…” (2007 ) www.trans-technical.com/images.html
    18. 18. To Observe To Investigate Key Words: An act of directing the eyes on an object: look, regard, sight, view, believe. To Contemplate To Remember Grayson Perry: Map to Nowhere. 2008 Steve Bell: 10 Dec 2013 No matter how famous you are, it appears, few can resist the appeal of the selfie
    19. 19. To Observe To Investigate To Contemplate To Remember “Thinking of Dad” (2007) Pen and Watercolour www.flickr.com/photos/sketchpot/ 16 Cai Guo-Qiang "Drawing for Transient Rainbow“ (2003) Gunpowder on paper, 198 x 157 inches
    20. 20. Taking a line for a walk! The artist Paul Klee spoke of drawing as “taking a line for a walk”—so start off in one corner of your page, and take your pencil for a stroll across it. Start off slow and meandering, then add some detours. Experiment with the weight of the line, pressing heavily and lightly. Do some zigzag sprints, flicking skips, and twirling spirals. See how many different marks you can create with a single pencil.
    21. 21. Pencil Shading Cross-hatching
    22. 22. Shading Support Task Sheet 1 NOTE: Trim the edges of this paper and stick this sheet in your sketchbook Exercise 1 Copy the tones into the boxes using a HB or 2B pencil. Try to keep within the boxes Exercise 2 Copy the crosshatching next to the marks below using a pen or biro Exercise 3 Copy following tones using a 4B pencil Exercise 4 Copy following 3D shapes using dark, mid-tone and light shades
    23. 23. Step 2: Drawing an eye, nose, mouth and ear. Learning objectives. By the end of the lesson you will: Understand how to create a realistic depiction of the features of a face. Apply the formal elements as appropriate in creating the features. Learning outcomes. By the end of the session you will have an accurate drawing of an eye, nose, mouth showing good use of tone. Glossary: The formal elements: Cross hatching: Stippling: Tone: Burnishing: Line, Tone, Colour, Pattern, Texture, Shape, Form At least two layers of parallel lines. The line sin each later travel in different directions. Areas of tone created by dots or specks. The degree of lightness or darkness of an area Heavy layers of pencil creating a shiny surface
    24. 24. Drawing eyes Structure of the eye clip (go to two thirds in).
    25. 25. Add tone to the iris and pupil working from the centre outwards. Create a shadow beneath the upper lid to show the eye sits behind it. The eyelashes are added, take a look at the angle that they are drawn, they are not drawn straight down,except for the ones in the centre. Add the lower lashes. Like the top eyelashes, the centre ones curve down and you go either left or right so you start to see the curve on the hair
    26. 26. Drawing mouths Clip of mouth drawing
    27. 27. 1. Draw a straight line to indicate where the lips should be. Curve the line to show an expression. 2. Draw a circle in the middle with a slight bit of the circle below the line. 3. Draw two circles / ovals on the side of and slightly above the first circle and two below. 4. Follow the shape of the circles as you draw the shape of the lips. NB the lips do not always go to the end of the line.
    28. 28. The purple highlighted areas in the illustration above show a particular shadowed area of the upper lip. As a general rule, all of the upper lip is darker (compared to the lower lip) but the area highlighted in purple is especially darker. If you look at the original mouth drawing above, you'll see the particular shadow of this area—like the lips go "in" there especially. This is where the lips curve "in" to the inside of the mouth. The highlighted area in orange shows an area of the lower lip that sometimes is a little darker, or gets a little more shadow. This is where the lower lip especially curves in. The closer to the edges of the mouth, the darker (or, in shadow) the bottom lip gets. But, remember the bottom lip is usually lighter than the top lip because it is facing upwards, and gets more light cast upon it. The highlighted area in green shows shows a shadowed area around the mouth that should not be forgotten. This shading indicates the structure of the face around the mouth. The mouth isn't just plopped on the face, it is a threedimensional thing, with surrounding muscles and structure. Usually, there will be some shading (subtle, but there) at under the lower lip, and around the corners of the mouth.
    29. 29. Drawing noses Nose drawing clip
    30. 30. Draw the shape the nostrils make at the base of the nose. The size will depend on your ‘model’ Complete the nostrils by adding lines (like brackets) around them. The curve in the middle shows where the tip of the nose is.
    31. 31. Drawing ears 7 minute drawing of ears.
    32. 32. Side view Draw a rectangle that is twice as high as it is broad. This will help us to keep the ear in the right proportions. Some ears are very flat inside, but the average ear is quite a sculpture. The shape inside of the ear looks like a curved version of the letter Y. Start to draw this with a line that begins at the left top and curves down to the bottom of the tragus, curving around the obstacle in its way. Start at the left side, close to the top, then curve upwards to touch the rectangle's top in the middle, and curve down again afterwards, touching the rectangles right side. In a long curve it then moves towards the bottom, where the small earlobe is finally ending its shape. In some ears you can still see a bit of the ear hole; in other ears it is entirely hidden behind the tragus. In case you want to shade your ear, draw the darkest values into the places where the least light is falling on, and leave the brightest places entirely white. Shading will strengthen the three-dimensional depth of your picture. Outline the ear's rim, by drawing a parallel line along its side. Some ears have a small bump in their upper corner here. The rim's shape continues and curves into the ear's inner part.
    33. 33. Front view The basic ear shape is almost the same as in the side view; the difference is just that the 1x2 proportions no longer apply. Draw the ear much narrower instead. It is probably three times as high as it is wide now. Also take care to make all the curves much flatter. Here is another special thing about the front view. The inner earstructure can be seen bulging out of the ear in some cases. Here it is overlapping the ear's rim a little bit. Draw in the beginning of the ear's upper rim. Make it fairly thick. The rest of the ear's rim lies in the back and appears to be a bit thinner. Note how its line starts from behind the line for the front rim. Also add the tragus at the side. Outline the inner edge of this part. Then add a little dent at its top, and your ear is finished
    34. 34. Step 3: Proportions of the face Learning objectives. By the end of the lesson you will: Understand how to plan a drawing of the face making sure that all the features are in proportion. Apply the formal elements as appropriate when creating the features and use tone to give the illusion that the features are three dimensional. Learning outcomes. By the end of the session you will be have an accurate portrait drawing. Glossary: Proportion: The formal elements: Cross hatching: Stippling: Tone: Burnishing: Proportion is the relative size and scale of various elements in a work of art. It describes the relationship between objects or parts of a whole. Line, Tone, Colour, Pattern, Texture, Shape, Form At least two layers of parallel lines. The line sin each later travel in different directions. Areas of tone created by dots or specks. The degree of lightness or darkness of an area Heavy layers of pencil creating a shiny surface
    35. 35. Shading Support Task Sheet 2 NOTE: Trim the edges of this paper and stick this sheet in your sketchbook Exercise 1 Practice drawing the following cross-hatchings using a pen/biro Exercise 2 Using the crosshatching technique, try drawing the face below using the outline to help Extension Exercise Take a portrait photograph from a magazine or newspaper and try to draw using the cross-hatching technique with a pen

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