Aliens SoW.pptx

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  • Use the ‘First ceramics lesson’ in the Autumn 2011 folder in the project folder in Art Resources (MLE). The aim is to allow students to interact with the clay and make a thumb pot. If these can be kept moist students can impress the objects they bring in later on to see how effecive they are. Understanding can be assessed using the clay jeopardy game. (same folder as the one mentionned above.)
  • Introduction to the artist: Born in England in 1962 and raised in Nigeria, Yinka Shonibare currently lives and works in London, where he has gained international attention by exploring issues of race and class through a range of media that includes sculpture, painting, photography, and installation art. Adopting a richly complex, unconventional approach, Shonibare lampoons the concept of achieving status through what might be called cultural authenticity. His works, simultaneously innocent and subversive, address a range of cultural and historical issues and, in the process, blur the boundaries of design, ethnography, and contemporary art. Commissioned by the Mayor of London and supported by Arts Council England with sponsorship from Guaranty Trust Bank of Nigeria, Nelson's Ship in a Bottle is a scale replica of HMS Victory in a giant bottle. The artwork will be the first commission on the Fourth Plinth to reflect specifically on the historical symbolism of Trafalgar Square, which commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, and will link directly with Nelson's column. It is also the first commission by a black British artist. The ship's 37 large sails will be made of richly patterned textiles commonly associated with African dress and symbolic of African identity and independence. The history of the fabric reveals that they were inspired by Indonesian batik design, mass produced by the Dutch and sold to the colonies in West Africa. Tying together historical and global threads, the work considers the legacy of British colonialism and its expansion in trade and Empire, made possible through the freedom of the seas that Nelson's Victory provided. Yinka Shonibare says his piece will reflect the story of multiculturalism in London: " For me its a celebration of London's immense ethnic wealth, giving expression to and honouring the many cultures and ethnicities that are still breathing precious wind into the sails of the United Kingdom. A ship in a bottle is an object of wonder. Adults and children are intrigued by its mystery. How can such towering masts and billowing sails fit inside such a commonplace object? With Nelson's Ship in a Bottle I want to take this childhood sense of wonder and amplify it to match the monumental scale of Trafalgar Square."
  • Like most of Shonibare’s works, Dysfunctional Family is a playful exploration of status, alienation, and multiculturalism. This is accentuated by the artist’s use of batik, a colorful, patterned material often used as a symbol for exoticism or “Africanness.” The fabric, however, is not indigenous to Africa, but is actually colonial in origin. First made in Indonesia, it was imported to Holland and reproduced by English designers. Dysfunctional Family consists of four stuffed mannequins of a stereotypical “space-alien” family that, at about four feet high, look like oversized cartoon toys. The artist here uses the patterned fabric as a metaphor for the phenomenon of cultural confusion, unveiling the notion of identity as a construct. At the same time, he uses the creatures to play on the notion of the foreign–or “alien”–in today’s social fabric
  • Significance of the printed fabric.
  • Indonesia- batik
  • Developed by Dutch
  • Developed in Holland
  • Mass produced in the north of England
  • Exported and sold to north Africa.
  • Aliens SoW.pptx

    1. 1. You will use your imagination to create your own alien sculpture and develop your skills in construction by using found materials to build with. You will develop a pattern based on your cultural heritage to decorate your alien. During this project you will explore the work of Yinka Shonibare and discover how he represents how alien you can feel in a new environment. You will learn about the ideas, methods and approaches used by other artists who have looked at similar ideas in their work. You will also be introduced to artists who attempt to express their cultural heritage in their work. SoW: Aliens (Year 7)
    2. 2. Step1: ‘Consequences’ Learning objectives. By the end of the task you will: •Understand the historical art context to the game ‘Consequences’’; •Be able to combine found images and your imagination to realise your ideas; •Work successfully within a team. Learning outcomes. By the end of the task you will: •Have played the game ‘Consequences’ and contributed to the creation of three Alien designs Surrealists believed that the parlour game, ‘Consequences’ was a pure creation of the mind. They saw it as exploiting the ‘mystique of accident’. The Chapman Brothers version of the Surrealist game feature comic-horror imagery: skulls, eyeballs on stalks, grotesque animal, writhing intestines, and claw-like hands and feet.
    3. 3. Inspiration:
    4. 4. Step 2: Alien Design Learning objectives. By the end of the task you will: •Be able to identify the ideas that have the most potential; •Understand construction techniques to a point. Learning outcomes. By the end of the task you will: •Adapt the consequence outcomes into a design that is far more personal to you; •Envisage how it will look from different angles by drawing your alien from different viewpoints.
    5. 5. Inspiration:
    6. 6. Step 3: Create a Maquette Learning objectives. By the end of the task you will: •Understand different ways to manipulate paper to create different shapes that have a range of strengths. Learning outcomes. By the end of the task you will: •Have created a maquette (rough model) of your alien; •Attempted a technique by Jacquet Fritz Junior (if appropriate); •Photographed you maquette and planned further developments in your sk/bk. Success Criteria…. What qualities would a successful maquette have? Make suggestions how your neighbour might have to adapt the design for the final alien on a post it note. Are there any particular materials or techniques they should use?
    7. 7. Jacquet Fritz Junior (You need two tubes.)
    8. 8. Step 4: Yinka Shonibare Learning objectives. By the end of the task you will: •Understand the difference between context and a concept and define these two areas in relation to Shonibare’s work; •Be able to explain the cultural heritage and significance of the patterned fabrics Shonibare uses. •Understand the issues behind the work of Yinka Shonibare’s piece, ‘Dysfunctional Family’. Learning outcomes. By the end of the task you will have: •Worked collaboratively to complete the research sheet about Shonibare.
    9. 9. ‘Dysfunctional Family’ by Yinka Shonibare In pairs, answer the following questions: Explain what you see in the picture? Can you recognise the different members of the family? If so, how do you know? How would you describe the patterns? Do you associate the patterns on the fabric with a particular place? What do you think the artist is trying to say in this art work? Explain your reasons. This art work is part of a series of art works called ‘Alien Nation’. How would you define an ‘Alien’? Does the title help you understand the artwork?
    10. 10. Patterned Fabric
    11. 11. ‘Dysfunctional Family’ by Yinka Shonibare In pairs, answer the following questions: Explain what you see in the picture? Can you recognise the different members of the family? If so, how do you know? How would you describe the patterns? Do you associate the patterns on the fabric with a particular place? What do you think the artist is trying to say in this art work? Explain your reasons. This art work is part of a series of art works called ‘Alien Nation’. How would you define an ‘Alien’? Does the title help you understand the artwork? Now that you have heard a little more about the artist- add more information to your sheet in a different colour.
    12. 12. Homework: 1. Write the title- ‘ Dysfunctional Family’ 1999 by Yinka Shonibare -in your sketchbook. 2. Draw one or more of the figures in colour. 3. Write up your comments from the questions completed in class. Try to use the specific vocab below. Level 4: Write out each question and answer each one in full sentences. Try to include the words below: Pattern Colourful Batik Sculpture Foreign Alien Level 5: Use the answers from the class task to help you write a short paragraph about this work. Use the level 4 words and those below: Issue based work Installation Race Class Identity Alienation Level 6 Collect more information about other themes Shonibare addresses in his work. Write a short paragraph covering the answers from the lesson and introducing the information you have discovered. Use the level 4, 5 and 6 vocab within your writing. Colonialism Globalisation Status Multiculturalism Stereotype Controversial Think carefully about the overall presentation. You may wish to create a border featuring some of the patterns Shonibare uses or include images of his other work.
    13. 13. Step 5: Making the Alien- armature Learning objectives. By the end of the task you will: •Identify the most appropriate materials to make a sound base for your sculpture; •Choose the best method of construction to achieve your ideas. Learning outcomes. By the end of the task you will have: •Created the armature for your alien.
    14. 14. Step 6: Making the Alien- construction Learning objectives. By the end of the task you will: •Identify the most appropriate materials to use for different parts of your sculpture; •Choose the best method of construction to achieve your ideas; •Plan further developments. Learning outcomes. By the end of the task you will have: •Achieved the target set for you at the start of the lesson.. Level 4: •I develop my practical skills and choose the most appropriate materials and techniques to make my alien. •My sculpture is sturdy and has no loose bits hanging off. Level 5: •I have developed my practical skills and construction techniques and can choose the most appropriate tools and materials to make my alien. Level 6 •I experiment with and explore the potentials of materials to plan future developments in my work. •I collect useful images and materials (without being asked by my teacher) to develop my alien. •I apply my practical skills and technical knowledge to achieve my alien design in 3D. Set targets for your neighbour at the beginning of every construction lesson. Discuss what should be completed and write all targets down on a post it note for the plenary at the end.
    15. 15. Construction techniques: Cut and slot card. Score card to help it bend and create geometric shapes. Alternatively score all along the width of a length of card to help you create a curved piece. Wire- especially good for snake like shapes. Makes great hands / claws. Stuffed tights or socks! Tights stretched over a wire shape is also good for creating skeletal shapes. Paper is the most versatile! You can: •Scrunch it and secure it with tape; •Roll it into strong lengths; •Layer it, wrap it, crease it and pleat it; •You can roll many balls of paper and tape them together to create a muscular effect……
    16. 16. Safe use of the Stanley knives. • Always be sure that blades are properly seated in knives and that knives are properly closed and/or fastened together before use. • Never leave a knife unattended with the blade exposed. • Always use sharp blades. A dull blade requires more force and is more likely to slip than a sharp one. Change the blade whenever it starts to tear instead of cut. • Protect your eyes - wear safety goggles when working with knives if possible. Never hold a knife to someone even as a joke. • Always keep your free hand away from the line of cut. • Always pull the knife toward you when making a cut on a flat surface. A pulling motion is stronger and more positive than pushing the knife away from you, and the knife is less likely to slip. • Use a ridged, metal ruler when cutting a straight edge. The straight edge needs to be thick enough to prevent the knife from "riding up" over the edge and cutting you. • When using a knife to cut through thick materials, be patient - make several passes, cutting a little deeper into the material with each pass. • USE A CUTTING MAT!
    17. 17. Dilomprizulike • Born in 1960 in Enugu, Nigeria, as Dil Humphrey-Umezulike, Dilomprizulike is now known as the self-styled 'Junkman From Africa‘. • He takes materials from the piles of used surplus clothes found on the streets of African cities, he makes installations and performances that look at what he describes as 'the alienated situation of the African in his own society.' • Dilom's descriptions of the life of the 'city-Nigerian' discusses of black alienation that arises during colonialism and the legacy of the colonial encounter, as well as the more contemporary phenomenon of globalisation.
    18. 18. Step 7: Papier Mache & Coloured Background Learning objectives. By the end of the task you will: •Understand the difference between colours that have a harmonious relationship and those that contrast with each other; •Have a greater understanding of the techniques used by Wangechi Mutu. Learning outcomes. By the end of the task you will have: •Covered your alien with 1 to 3 different coloured tissue paper. Some of you may have also applied inks and (in a few occasions) bleach to alter the appearance of the tissue paper. Analogous or Harmonius colour relationships. Complementary (contrasting colours sit opposite each other on the colour wheel).
    19. 19. Which of these pairs of colours are harmonius and which pairs are complementary pairs (sit opposite each other on the colour wheel)?
    20. 20. opposite opposite harmonious harmonious opposite harmoniousharmonious opposite opposite opposite harmoniousharmonious
    21. 21. • Born in Nairobi, Kenya, educated in Britain and resident in New York since the mid- nineties. • Her paintings and collages often feature twisting female forms, their skin an eruption of mutant appendices like gun shafts or machine gears sprouting from the sockets of joints, their bodies half human, half hyena. • Mutu commonly works on paper, manipulating ink and acrylic paint into pools of colour. • Wangechi Mutu's work boldly explores the contradictions of female and cultural identity, drawing the viewer into conversations about beauty, consumerism, colonialism, race, and gender. Wengechi Mutu Wangechi Mutu (teachers, watch first!)
    22. 22. Level 4: •I have developed my practical skills and chosen the most appropriate materials and techniques to make my alien. •My sculpture is sturdy and has no loose bits hanging off. Level 5: •I have developed my practical skills and construction techniques and can choose the most appropriate tools and materials to make my alien. Level 6 •I experiment with and explore the potentials of materials to plan future developments in my work. •I collect useful images and materials (without being asked by my teacher) to develop my alien. •I apply my practical skills and technical knowledge to achieve my alien design in 3D. Construction Level 4: •My sculpture is covered with one layer of coloured tissue paper- there are no loose pieces. •I use the examples of patterns to help me design shapes to cover my alien. Level 5: •My sculpture is covered with two different colours, I have also created darker areas with ink. •I have experimented with combinations.of shapes, collage and drawing to design my alien’s pattern. Level 6 •I have used a combination of coloured tissue paper and inks to create an interesting surface on my alien similar to Wengechi Mutu. •I have combined my own patterns with those by Shonibare to cover my alien.The tissue shapes compliment the drawn patterns. Pattern
    23. 23. Step 8: Patterns Learning objectives. By the end of the task you will: •Have developed a sensitivity to pattern showing an ability to combine your own imagery and patterns that already exist. Learning outcomes. By the end of the task you will have: •Cut smaller, tissue paper shapes to layer over the coloured background from the last task; •Drawn your personal pattern over both layers.
    24. 24. Fabric context
    25. 25. Abdoulaye Konate • Abdoulaye Konaté (b. 1953) lives and works in Bamako, Mali. • He addresses social, political and economic problems such as AIDS or the crises between Israel and Palestine. • He uses a combination of textiles, gris-gris, bullets, used clothing or sand. • His work reflects a Malian, African and universal collective consciousness.

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