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LEAN SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT:  A CASE STUDY IN A MEDIUM-SIZED COMPANY IN BRAZILIAN STATE OF SANTA CATARINA
 

LEAN SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY IN A MEDIUM-SIZED COMPANY IN BRAZILIAN STATE OF SANTA CATARINA

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This article presents a literature review whose purpose is to identify the key characteristics of lean software development and its similarities and differences with agile methodologies. A case study ...

This article presents a literature review whose purpose is to identify the key characteristics of lean software development and its similarities and differences with agile methodologies. A case study conducted in a team of software developers is presented, where lean concepts were applied within the current process, previously based on agile methodologies. It was found at the end of this work that the indicator used by the team, percentage of the time spent on improvements and new features, had a significant increase, causing the team being able to add more value to the product, and to increase the level of quality.

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    LEAN SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT:  A CASE STUDY IN A MEDIUM-SIZED COMPANY IN BRAZILIAN STATE OF SANTA CATARINA LEAN SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY IN A MEDIUM-SIZED COMPANY IN BRAZILIAN STATE OF SANTA CATARINA Presentation Transcript

    • LEAN SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY IN A MEDIUM-SIZED COMPANY IN BRAZILIAN STATE OF SANTA CATARINA Ivan Bosnic bosnic.ivan@gmail.com Mehran Misaghi mehran@sociesc.org.br
    • Agenda Introduction What is Lean Software Development? Lean Software Development in Practice Results From Case Study Conclusion
    • Introduction Modern societies depend on software for and for several others critical services.
    • Introduction Even with so much importance software project success rates are still very low.
    • What is Lean Software Development? Ideas and concepts from Lean Manufacturing and Lean Product Development Based on Toyota Production System and Toyota System of Product Development Main goal is to eliminate waste Much broader concept then Agile Based on seven principles
    • Principles of Lean Software Development Eliminate waste Integrating Quality Creating Knowledge Postpone Commitments Delivering Fast Respect People OPTIMIZE THE WHOLE
    • Eliminate Waste (Hibbs, Jewett and Sullivan (2009)) Defects: cause costly rework Overproduction:Unnecessary features Stock: Partially completed tasks Transportations: Switching between tasks Further processing: unnecessary processes. Standby: Delays
    • Lean Software Development in Practice Eliminate waste Multitasking problem identified as major cause of decreased productivity Each sprint, one developer is responsible for providing support Other developers are not allowed to work on more than one task at a time Goal is to implement continuous and unit flow
    • Lean Software Development in Practice Integrating quality Automated tests integrated into process from the beginning Leaving test development for later is a huge waste
    • Lean Software Development in Practice Creating knowledge Knowledge should be available to all members A collaborative tool for knowledge management was implemented
    • Lean Software Development in Practice Postpone commitments Important decisions postponed until team had more knowledge Practice proved to be very effective, avoiding hasty decisions
    • Lean Software Development in Practice Delivering fast Divide the project into smaller interactions between 3 to 4 weeks Obtain the customer feedback more rapidly Widely used in SCRUM (one of the agile methodologies)
    • Lean Software Development in Practice Respect people Planning future releases involves opinion of all members Make the team commits to the estimates
    • Results From Case Study Case study conducted in a team with more than 5 years of Agile experience Data collection period: September 2011 until August 2012 Tasks are divided in 4 groups (components) and time is recorded daily Product Bugs Support Management
    • Group details  Product: groups all the hours spent on tasks that add value to the product, such as improvements and new features, development of automated tests, etc.  Bugs: the time spent on correction of nonconformities;  Support: hours are recorded in support activities provided to other teams;  Management: all tasks related to project management: meetings, planning, daily meetings, etc.
    • Tools used in the process of software development Documenting functional and technical details o Registration and monitoring of requirements o Time recording and graph tracking progress of version
    • Results From Case Study Percentage of time spent per component 70 60 50 40 Product 30 Bug 20 Others 13.9 10 0 5.9
    • Results From Case Study Time invested in improvements and new features 70 60 50 Product September 2011 October 2011 November 2011 40 30 20 December 2011 January 2012 February 2012 Martch 2012 April 2012 10 0 May 2012 June 2012 July 2012 August 2012
    • Results From Case Study Time spent on bug fixing 16 14 12 10 Bug September 2011 October 2011 November 2011 December 2011 8 6 4 January 2012 February 2012 Martch 2012 April 2012 2 May 2012 0 June 2012 July 2012 August 2012
    • Conclusion ~20% increase in time invested in product Time spent in bug fixes decreased from 14% to 6% Elimination of waste achieved by elimination of multitasking Automated testing responsible for integrating more quality to software Lean and Agile are complementary methodologies
    • Our Contribution • •
    • Main Result Indicator used by the team, percentage of the time spent on improvements and new features, had a significant increase, causing the team being able to add more value to the product, and to increase the level of quality.
    • References 1. Arked, M., 2003. Risk reduction with the RUP phase plan. 2003. Available at: <http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/rational/library/1826.html>. 2. Cohn, Mike, 2010. Succeeding with agile: Software development using scrum. Addison-Wesley, Boston, USA. 3. Dyba, T.; Dingsoyr, T., 2008. Empirical studies of agile software development: A systematic review. Information And Software Technology. Vol. 50, pp 833-859. 4. Gustavsson, Håkan, 2011. Lean thinking applied to system architecting. Thesis. Department of School Of Innovation, Design And Engineering, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden. 5. Hibbs, C.; Jewett, S.; Sullivan, M., 2009. The art of lean software development. Sebastopol: O’Reilly Media, Inc, Sebastopol, USA. 6. Kniberg, H., 2011. Lean from the Trenches: Managing Large-Scale Projects with Kanban. The Pragmatic Bookshelf, Dallas, USA. 7. Ohno, T., 1988. Toyota Production Software: Beyond Large Scale Production. Productivity Press, Oregon, USA. 8. Petersen, Kai, 2010. Implementing Lean and Agile Software Development in Industry. Thesis - Department of School Of Computing, Blekinge Institute Of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden. 9. Poppendieck, M; Poppendieck, T, 2007. Implementing Lean Software Development: From Concept to Cash. Addison-Wesley, Boston, USA. 10.Pressman, R. S., 2004. Software Engineering: a Practitioner’s Approach. 6th. ed. McGraw-Hill, New York, USA. 11.Preis, K. H.; Quigley, J. M., 2011. Scrum Project Management. CRC Press, Boca Raton, USA. 12.Shore, J.; Warden, S., 2008. The Art of Agile Development. Sebastopol: O’Reilly Media, Inc, Sebastopol, USA. 13.Smith, G.; Sidky, A., 2009. Becoming Agile: In an imperfect world. Manning Publications Co, Greenwich, England. 14.Sommerville, Ian, 2011. Software Engineering. 9Th ed. Addison-Wesley, Boston, USA. 15.Vlaanderen, Kevin et al., 2011. The agile requirements refinery: Applying SCRUM principles to software product management. Information And Software Technology. Vol. 53, no 1, pp 58-70.