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Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
Water Policies in India
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Water Policies in India

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  • 1. INDIA
  • 2. • Declining surface water sources like canal and tank irrigation. • Increased groundwater exploitation. • Increased depletion of groundwater. • Replenishment becomes problem if non renewable groundwater is used. • Resource preservation would not be in the best interest of the region.
  • 3. • Water is a prime natural resource, a basic human need and a precious national asset. • Planning, development and management of water resources need to be governed by national perspectives.
  • 4. • Water resource planning • Conservation of water • Water allocation priorities • Project planning • Groundwater development • Drinking water • Irrigation • Resettlement and rehabilitation • Water sharing amongst the states
  • 5. • Private Sector Participation • Water Quality • Water Zoning • Land erosion by sea or river • Flood Control and management • Drought prone Area Development • Performance Improvement • Maintenance and Modernization
  • 6. • The principle of equity and social justice must inform the use and allocation of water. • A common integrated perspective should govern the planning and management of water resources. • Water needs to be managed as a common pool community resource. • Water may be treated as an economic good to promote its conservation and efficient use. • The river basin should be considered as the basic hydrological unit.
  • 7. Enhancing water available for use • Rainfall needs to be used directly . • Aquifers need to be mapped to know the quantum and quality of ground water resources. • Declining ground water levels in over-exploited areas need to be arrested. • Inter-basin transfers of water from surplus basins to deficit basins/areas need to be encouraged. • Integrated watershed development activities with groundwater perspectives need to be undertaken .
  • 8. Demand management and water use efficiency • Systems to benchmark water use, such as water footprints and water auditing need to be developed. • Project appraisals and environment impact assessment should include analyses of water footprints. • Water needs to be saved during irrigation. • Small local level irrigation through small bunds, field ponds etc. needs to be encouraged.
  • 9. Water Pricing • Water Regulatory Authority should be established in each state. • Water charges should be determined on a volumetric basis. • Recycle and reuse of water should be incentivized through a properly planned tariff system.
  • 10. Adaptation to climate change • Increasing water storage in the forms of soil moisture, ponds, ground water, small and large reservoirs. • Enhancing the efficiency of water use through the adoption of agricultural strategies. • Stakeholder participation in land-soil-water management. • Incorporating coping strategies for possible climate changes in the planning of water resource structures.
  • 11. Management of flood and drought • • Agricultural strategies must be evolved to improve soil and water productivity. • Revetments (walls), spurs, embankments, etc. should be constructed to prevent soil erosion. • Flood forecasting needs to be expanded and modernized to the rest of the country . • Frequency based flood inundation maps should be prepared to evolve coping strategies.
  • 12. Water supply and sanitation • Least water intensive sanitation and sewerage systems with decentralized sewage treatment plants should be incentivized. • In urban and industrial areas, rainwater harvesting and de-salinization should be encouraged. • Urban water supply and sewage treatment schemes should be integrated and executed simultaneously. • Subsidies and incentives should be implemented to encourage the recovery of industrial pollutants and recycling.
  • 13. Conservation of river corridors, water bodies and infrastructure • Conservation of river corridors, water bodies and infrastructure needs to be undertaken. • Encroachments and diversion of water bodies and drainage channels must not be allowed. • Pollution of sources of water and water bodies should not be allowed. • Legally empowered dam safety services need to be ensured. ƒ
  • 14. Project planning and implementation • All clearances required for implementation should be made time bound. • Concurrent monitoring should be undertaken for timely interventions. • Water resource projects should be executed closely after they are planned. • Local governing bodies such as panchayats should be involved in the planning of projects.
  • 15. • Originated from the intervention of Indira Gandhi . • Central Ganga Authority (CGA) was formed • The Ganga Project Directorate (GPD) was established as a wing of the Department of Environment. • GAP was launched by Rajiv Gandhi at Varanasi.
  • 16. • To abate pollution and improve water quality. • To conserve biodiversity and develop an integrated river basin management approach. • To conduct comprehensive research . • To gain experience for implementing similar river clean up programs in other polluted rivers in India.
  • 17. • Launched in the year 1985 to improve the water quality of river Ganga. • Envisaged to intercept, divert and treat 882 mld (Million litres per day) out of 1340 mld of wastewater, generated in 25 class- I towns in 3 States of Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and West Bengal. • Completed in March 2000.
  • 18. • Approved in stages from 1993 onwards which included tributaries of the river Ganga namely, Yamuna, Gomati, Damodar and Mahananda. • Renamed program as Nation River Conservation Program instead of Ganga Action Plan. • Spread in 165 towns of 17 different states. • Undertook pollution abatement works.
  • 19. • Inappropriate Environmental Planning. • Non availability of Environmental State-of-the-Art. • Improper mass awareness and involvement of Ganga users. • Lack of local technical expert committees for monitoring work. • Establishment of non specific Sewage Treatment Plants on highly productive crop lands. • Insignificant cooperation between Central, State and Local Government bodies. • Least political dedication and vision to save the Ganga.
  • 20. • Worshipped and defiled simultaneously. • Unplanned urbanization and industrialization. • Need to be taught that Ganga has lost its divine role. • People must be warned that Ganga waters are not worth bathing and drinking. • A massive campaign “Can we not clean Ganga?” should be launched. • Central leadership must take the issue seriously.

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