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    Tech Tech Presentation Transcript

    • The AIDS Epidemic By Leigha Miller
    • AIDS
        • Throughout 1982, the number of cases of AIDS had been rising steadily, the gay community being affected the most.
        • In the third quarter of 1982, only 15 AIDS stories appeared in the nation's leading newspapers and news magazines.
          • The number jumped to 30 in December, following two reports from the Centers for Disease Control.
        • On December 9, the CDC announced that a child diagnosed with AIDS had received a blood transfusion from an adult victim
        • On December 17, its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report detailed several instances of "Unexplained Immunodeficiency and Opportunistic Infections in Infants—New York, New Jersey, California"; the babies had all been born to IV (intravenous) drug users.
    • AIDS
        • It was finally stated on May 24 by the Department of Health and Human Services that AIDS had become the federal government's top medical priority.
        • Given the syndrome's virulence in breaking down the body's immune system, most doctors believed their work would not be easy and finding a treatment could take years.
        • The fear in panic grew in everyone; those with and without AIDS.
    • AIDS
        • The diagnosis of AIDS was considered to be a death sentence.
          • AIDS cases had risen to 3,064; of these, 1,292 had died.
        • The decade's major distinctive health issue, AIDS, was also the most devastating: By June 1989 nearly 106,000 cases had been reported, of which 61,000 had died.
        • As treatments improved, so did public acceptance of the disease—and, gradually, of homosexuality, although gays still suffered prejudice from their initial unwilling association with the epidemic.