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Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
Week6 content exploration
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Week6 content exploration

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  • Benefits:Gives immediate private feedbackMotivates students to practiceSaves teacher time correcting student work.Whereas tutorials may present new material, drill-and-practice software is designed to reinforce previously presented content. Drill-and-practice software is used to question learners on key content points, giving them the opportunity to practice content by responding to specific questions. This type of softwure provides instant feedback as to the correctness of a response. Some drill-and-practice software packages track correct answers and move the level of questioning to more complex content as the students' responses indicate increased mastery. Drill-and-practice software, like tutorials, ranges from fairly simple text-based, flash-card-type software to complex and sophisticated multimedia software. Drill-and-practice software allows the student to control the pace of the interaction, but users typically cannot alter the path of the review until they have mastered each level. Unlike answering review questions or taking a pop quiz for content practice, using drill-and-practice software provides instant feedback, and it may respond with additional drills targeting diagnosed weaknesses. Critics of this type of software refer to it as "drill-and-kill" software, expressing the notion that it can be a boring and passive learning experience. Indeed, some drill-and-practice software lacks quality and interest.
  • BENEFITS:Same as drill-and-practice (immediate private feedback / time saving)Offers instruction that can stand on its ownhttp://www.superkids.com/ROSETTA STONETutorial software presents new material, usually in a carefully orchestrated instructional sequence with frequent opportunities for practice and review. These software packages are often self-contained lessons designed and planned according to the principles of instructional design. Tutorial software programs can either be linear or use a hypermedia approach. Linear tutorials take the learner step-by-step through each phase of the instructional process for each objective. Tutorials give the student control of the pace and, in the case of hypermedia tutorials, the path of instruction. Tutorials are limited by their ability to respond to students' questions or concerns outside their programming. Even the bestdesigned tutorial software may not be able to respond to the divergent thinking of many learners. For many users, tutorials are viewed as limiting and potentially boring because of their rigidity in the presentation of topics. Still. a well-written tutorial that is programmed with multimedia components in the presentation of materials can hR very useful for support or review of material or even as an additional strategy in the communication of content. Whereas tutorials may present new material, drill-and-practice software is designed to reinforce previously presented content. Drill-and-practice software is used to question learners on key content points, giving them the opportunity to practice content by responding to specific questions. This type of softwure provides instant feedback as to the correctness of a response. Some drill-and-practice software packages track correct answers and move the level of questioning to more complex content as the students' responses indicate increased mastery. Drill-and-practice software, like tutorials, ranges from fairly simple text-based, flash-card-type software to complex and sophisticated multimedia software. Drill-and-practice software allows the student to control the pace of the interaction, but users typically cannot alter the path of the review until they have mastered each level. Unlike answering review questions or taking a pop quiz for content practice, using drill-and-practice software provides instant feedback, and it may respond with additional drills targeting diagnosed weaknesses. Critics of this type of software refer to it as "drill-and-kill" software, expressing the notion that it can be a boring and passive learning experience. Indeed, some drill-and-practice software lacks quality and interest.
  • Among the oldest forms of computer-based educational games are quiz games,where quizzes arc embedded in a quiz show context. For example, Games2Train(http://www.games2train.com/games) produces a game maker called Pick-it! forteachers to construct quiz games (sec Figure 3.7). The game maker resembles the televisionquiz show Jeopardy, allowing game player.; to select topics and values and playagainst others. The degree of meaningfulness of the learning from these gamesdepends on the nature of the responses that are required. More often than not, quizgames require only memorization performance. While memorization of domain contentmay be important, these games do not readily engage students in deeper-level,meaningful learning activities (e.g., application and synthesis).More complex games, such as the different versions of Sid Meier's Civilization(http://simcity.ea.com/),engagestudentsincomplexproblemsolving while tryingto manage their civilization. Students can select different civilizations to explore,from Swncrians to the mystical Mayans. In the game, students can map the worldusing satellite images. They can form allies and attack other civilizations or forgealliances with them. They can choose the form of government they wish to imposeon their civilization (e.g., fascism, feudalism, tribal council, or imperialism). Theycan also use a weU-developed trade system to manage resources, trade routes, andWhereas tutorials may present new material, drill-and-practice software is designed to reinforce previously presented content. Drill-and-practice software is used to question learners on key content points, giving them the opportunity to practice content by responding to specific questions. This type of softwure provides instant feedback as to the correctness of a response. Some drill-and-practice software packages track correct answers and move the level of questioning to more complex content as the students' responses indicate increased mastery. Drill-and-practice software, like tutorials, ranges from fairly simple text-based, flash-card-type software to complex and sophisticated multimedia software. Drill-and-practice software allows the student to control the pace of the interaction, but users typically cannot alter the path of the review until they have mastered each level. Unlike answering review questions or taking a pop quiz for content practice, using drill-and-practice software provides instant feedback, and it may respond with additional drills targeting diagnosed weaknesses. Critics of this type of software refer to it as "drill-and-kill" software, expressing the notion that it can be a boring and passive learning experience. Indeed, some drill-and-practice software lacks quality and interest.
  • BENEFITS:Compress time or slows down processesGets students involvedMakes experimentation safeMakes the impossible possibleSaves money and other resourcesAllows repetition with variationsAllows observation of complex processesMultiple simulations: http://www.design-simulation.com/IP/simulationlibrary/flash-simulations.phpFlight Simulator: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tzqpl1THYbs&feature=relatedIt's amazing how really simple, yet amazingly effective this can be. There are so many computer simulation programs (kids will call them games), that it's impossible to list them all. "Games" like Flight Simulator (pictured to the right) are just one example of a simulation. Flight simulation on the computer is so good that you could actually learn the ground school portion of what is required for a beginner's pilot's license on the computer. And you'd probably be quite comfortable on your first flight as a student pilot. There is quite a bit of educational shareware available as well.GPS LessonsStudents in Chelsea, Massachusetts, High School worked with the local fire department and the Envirorunental Protection Agency to design and react to a simulated. toxic chemical spill by tracking the spill, rerouting traffic, and warning the public.• Students in Perham, Minnesota, used GIS and Global Positioning Systems (GPS) to help track newly reintroduced wolves into the Minnesota wilderness.• Students in Raleigh, North Carolina, created a cultural anthropological view of the history of Raleigh by tracing annexations. They also created individual "life maps" showing the geographical progressions of individuals as they moved around the city. These students developed a new understanding of history.Whereas tutorials may present new material, drill-and-practice software is designed to reinforce previously presented content. Drill-and-practice software is used to question learners on key content points, giving them the opportunity to practice content by responding to specific questions. This type of softwure provides instant feedback as to the correctness of a response. Some drill-and-practice software packages track correct answers and move the level of questioning to more complex content as the students' responses indicate increased mastery. Drill-and-practice software, like tutorials, ranges from fairly simple text-based, flash-card-type software to complex and sophisticated multimedia software. Drill-and-practice software allows the student to control the pace of the interaction, but users typically cannot alter the path of the review until they have mastered each level. Unlike answering review questions or taking a pop quiz for content practice, using drill-and-practice software provides instant feedback, and it may respond with additional drills targeting diagnosed weaknesses. Critics of this type of software refer to it as "drill-and-kill" software, expressing the notion that it can be a boring and passive learning experience. Indeed, some drill-and-practice software lacks quality and interest.
  • BENEFITS:Challenging activities to motivate students to spend more time on the topicFrom literature to environmental science, Google Earth can help you bring a world of information alive for your students. You can use Google Earth demos to get your students excited about geography, and use different Google Earth layers to study economics, demographics, and transportation in specific contexts. For instance: you can use real-time coordinates to demonstrate distance calculations and verify the results using our measurement tools; view tectonic plate-shift evidence by examining whole continents, mountain ranges and areas of volcanic activity; study impact craters, dry lake beds and other major land forms.  Students can also use Google Earth to explore topics like the progress of human civilization, the growth of cities, the impact of civilization on the natural environment, and the impact of natural disasters like Hurricane Katrina. Using Google SketchUp and historic overlays, students can recreate entire ancient cities. The only limit to Google Earth's classroom uses is your imagination. Don't limit your imagination to our lonely planet, though, launch your student's imagination with Sky in Google Earth. And if you prefer to explore the night sky from your browser, you can now try Google Sky on the web. Whether you stargaze, explore Hubble telescope images, or check out current astronomical events, you'll capture the wonder of the universe without leaving your classroom. Here are some other ideas for using Google Earth in your classroom: Biology: Track routes of chimpanzees in Tanzania's Gombe Forest. See the Jane Goodall Institute Chimpanzee blog here. Ecology: Create a short quiz like this one. Environmental Science: Have students check Alaska's global warming problems. See how the Sierra Club used Google Earth to depict this problem here. Geology: Find images, links, and descriptions, with information about thousands of volcanoes around the globe, thanks to organizations like the Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program.Global Awareness: Study the Crisis in Darfur with the US Holocaust Memorial Museum's unprecedented project. History: Explore Tutankhamun's Tomb.Humanities: Have your students scout film shoot locations like this teacher did with The Golden Compass. Literature: Bring class or contemporary tales to life with Google LitTrips. Math: Explore distance, velocity, and wave properties of tsunamis.
  • ANSWERS:Frog Dissection: Simulation/Microworldhttp://www.mhhe.com/biosci/genbio/virtual_labs/BL_16/BL_16.htmlGrammar Gorilla: Educational (Interactive) Game incorporating elements of drill and practice http://www.funbrain.com/grammar/index.html
  • Transcript

    • 1. CONTENT EXPLORATION TASKS AND TOOLS
      UNIT 2: TECHNOLOGY FOR LEARNERS AND LEARNING
      W200: WEEK 6
    • 2. RECAP:: WEEK 5
      SNOWY
      Standards :: Needs :: Options :: What :: whY
      Reflection
      Are they meeting the standards?
    • 3. ACTIVITY: Teacher website
      PPT Presentation
      For Students >> Class Materials
      Embed your PPT file
      Embedding vs. Linking
      How to embed?
      Google Presentation
      Slideshare.net
      Sign up using your Facebook account
      Upload your PPT file
      Copy the embed code
      Paste the embed code into the HTML editor
      Give it a title
      Provide a brief description
      10 mins
    • 4. FOR DISCUSSION
      INTRODUCTION
      TOOLS FOR CONTENT EXPLORATION TASKS
      IN-CLASS WORKOUT #6: Creating a WebQuest
      CASE ANALYSIS WORKSHOP
    • 5. The goals for today arE:
      • By the end of this discussion you will:
      • 6. Learn about the different types of tasks
      • 7. Learn about the types of tools for content exploration tasks
      • 8. Learn how to identify appropriate tools for a specific learning goal
    • WHAT IS A tool?
      A tool is:
      an instrument used for doing work
      Instructional tools help your students do meaningful work
      A tool should not be:
      The focal point of an activity
      E.g. Use of scientific calculator
      What drives you to choose what to do
      Should be based on the standards and students’ needs
      A tool meets the needs of a context to complete specific tasks
    • 9. WHAT IS A tool?
      Priority should be given to CONTENT!
      What is content?
      What task needs to be accomplished to teach the content?
      What technology tool is appropriate?
      And then, make a good use of the tool to best fit the task.
    • 10. CATEGORIES OF TASKS
    • 11. CATEGORIES OF TASKS
      A tool can be used for multiple tasks. It depends on how you use it.
      e.g.) Inspiration
    • 12. Content Exploration Tasks and ToolsLearn and post ONE to teacher website
    • 13. KNOWLEDGE IS THE PURPOSE OF TOOLs used in CONTENT EXPLORATION TASKS
      Explore New Knowledge
      Review Knowledge
      Apply Knowledge
    • 14. What are the purposes of content exploration tasks and the tools they use?
      Explore New Knowledge
      Review Knowledge
      Textbook
      Apply Knowledge
      Science Lab
    • 15. What are the purposes of content exploration tasks and the tools they use?
      Explore New Knowledge
      Review Knowledge
      Apply Knowledge
      Flash Cards
      Cliff Notes
    • 16. What are the purposes of content exploration tasks and the tools they use?
      Explore New Knowledge
      ReviewKnowledge
      Apply Knowledge
      Foreign Language Practice (LiveMocha)
      Math Game
      (Fun School)
    • 17. TYPE OF TOOLs FOR CONTENT EXPLORATION TASKs
      Least Complex
      Least Interactive
      Least Authentic to “real-world”
      Reference
      Drill & Practice
      Tutorials
      Educational
      Games
      Simulations
      Most Complex
      Most Interactive
      Most Authentic to “real-world”
      Open Ended
      Tools
    • 18. TYPE OF TOOLs FOR CONTENT EXPLORATION TASKs
      Purpose
      Providing information for students
      Format
      Text; Image; Animation
      No significant interaction
      Examples
      Low Tech
      Reference books; textbooks
      News Sources (traditional format)
      Instructional TV; Video
      Ex. Reading Rainbow; Nat. Geo.
      High Tech
      Wikipedia
      TeacherTube; YouTube
      Education Podcasts
      Kahn Academy
      REFERENCE
      |Explores Knowledge|
    • 19. TYPE OF TOOLs FOR CONTENT EXPLORATION TASKs
      Purpose
      Promote the acquisition of knowledge or skill through repetitive practice and immediate feedback
      Format
      memorization of spelling or vocabulary words, or the practicing of arithmetic facts
      Examples
      Flash Card & Online Quiz
      Ex.Online Flash Cards
      Typing Programs
      Ex.Online Typing Program
      Online Game
      http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/
      DRILL & PRACTICE
      |Reviews Knowledge|
    • 20. TYPE OF TOOLs FOR CONTENT EXPLORATION TASKs
      Purpose
      Introduces new material
      Instruction with practice and review
      Entire instructional sequence
      Format
      Content is presented and then evaluated whether content is learned (includes drill & practice)
      Linear or Hypermedia
      Examples
      Rosetta Stone
      TUTORIAL
      |Explores / Reviews
      Knowledge|
    • 21. TYPES OF TOOL FOR CONTENT EXPLORATION TASK
      Purpose
      Provide an immersive learning environment
      Format
      Content is packaged in a sequence of game rules
      Examples
      Provide an immersive learning environment
      Oregon Trail
      Quest Atlantis
      EDUCATIONAL GAMES
      Reviews / Applies
      Knowledge
    • 22. TYPES OF TOOL FOR CONTENT EXPLORATION TASK
      Purpose
      Emulation of real thing, state of affairs or process
      Allows the user to see the impact of one’s decisions and/or actions
      Format
      Simplifies the context for learners to focus on the main content
      Examples
      Mars-Earth Orbits
      Stock Market Simulation
      SIMULATION
      Applies Knowledge
    • 23. TYPE OF TOOLs FOR CONTENT EXPLORATION TASKs
      Purpose
      Provide opportunities to interact with real-world like content
      Format
      Tool can be manipulated to accommodate various content areas
      Examples
      Google Earth
      Google Earth for Educators
      OPEN ENDED TOOLS
      Explores / Reviews /
      Applies Knowledge
    • 24. ACTIVITY: GUESS THE TYPE OF TOOLTYPES OF TOOL FOR CONTENT EXPLORATION TASK
      Go to each one and can you tell what type of content exploration task, each would fall under?
      1
      2
    • 25. 15 mins
      BREAK!
    • 26. IN-CLASS ACTIVITY 6Creating a WebQuest
      60 mins
      Digital Natives WebQuest
    • 27. How can we make a WebQuest?
      Technology tools
      Pedagogical Knowledge
      • Coming up with a task through which students will LEARN the learning goals.
      • 36. Providing appropriate guidelines and resources
      • 37. Providing self-assessment tools
      Knowledge on the topic
    • 38. In-Class WORKOUT 6: Creating a WebQuest
      Create a WebQuest in your case analysis group
      Content: Standard
      Refer to Your Class Prep #6
      W200 Week 6
    • 39. In-Class WORKOUT 6: Creating a WebQuest
      Pedagogy:
      Task
      problem or mystery to be solved;
      product to be designed;
      ToonDoo, XtraNormal, Inspiration, PPT, Google Docs etc.
      complexity to be analyzed;
      summary to be created;
      persuasive message or journalistic account to be crafted; etc.
      Process & Resources
      Sequence the process
      Provide a step-by-step guidance
      Provide appropriate resources and guidance
      Evaluation
      Provide a self-assessment tool
      Checklist, Rubric, Quiz.
    • 40. In-Class WORKOUT 6: Creating a WebQuest
      Create a WebQuest in your case analysis group
      Technology: Google Sites
      Create a site for each group (Only group facilitator)
      Share the site with their group members as collaborators
      Create pages: Introduction, Task, Process, Evaluation, Conclusion, Credits (Group members' name and references)
      How to Add YouTube videos
      WebQuests Template
    • 41. In-Class WORKOUT 6: Creating a WebQuest
      Introduction
      Describe academic standard including subject, grade level, learning goals
      Orient students and capture their interest
      Task
      Describe what the end result will look like
      Process
      Walk students through the process step by step
      Provide appropriate resources that will enhance their learning experiences
      Evaluation
      Provide self-assessment tools
      Conclusion
      Summarize the activity and provide further references
      Credits
      Give your group members credits
      Cite resources
    • 42. How to submit ICW #6
      Post it on Teacher Website > Class Materials
      Title
      Screenshot
      URL
      Description
      Submit the link of your Class Materials page to Oncourse > Assignments > ICW #6
    • 43. Case Analysis Workshop #1
      30 mins
      Free Rider Policy
      If I hear anything about social loafing,
      you might be fired from the group and have to work alone.
      Group Work Policy
      Every aspect should be discussed among group members.
      Make sure all of the parts are consistent!!!
    • 44. recap :: case analysis
      Standard
      Needs
      Options for the tasks
      At least two for one task
      What & whY
      Select an option for each task and justify
      Define tasks
    • 45. DEMO :: case analysis template
      W200 Website >> Assignment >> Cases
      Case Analysis Template (Only for group facilitator)
      Use template
      Change title : Case1_Subject (Last names)
      Share the Google Doc with group members and me (leedabae@gmail.com)
      Publish it to the web
      Make it public
      Cases (Only for group facilitator)
      Find a case in your subject area
      Copy and paste the case on the Google Doc
    • 46. Case analysis WORKSHOP :: Expectations
      Case Information (5)
      Include all and every part of the case
      Step 1: Standards & Needs (10)
      Identify all the standards and needs
      Come up with appropriate tasks e.g. lecture, hands-on activity, etc.
      Step 2: Technology Options (15)
      List appropriate specific resources
      List possible tools
      At least 3 tools for a subtask e.g. presentation: MS, Prezi, Google
      At least 10 options per group member
    • 47. Case analysis WORKSHOP :: Expectations
      Step 3: Technology Decisions (15)
      Select appropriate tools give the needs and standards
      Sequence the tools
      e.g. Quiz -> Lecture -> Hands-on Activity
      Step 4: Reflection (30)
      Justify your decisions based on the needs and standards
      Evaluate your decisions in terms of Efficiency, Effectiveness and Enhancement
      Muddiest Point
    • 48. What’s Due, When and Where?
      DUE ON MONDAY BY 5:00 PM
      ICW #6: Submit the link to Oncourse > Assignments 2> ICW#6
      Class Prep #7
      Work on Case Analysis #1 (Due Week 8) in your groups

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