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Slides - Slide 1

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Published in: Economy & Finance, Technology

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  • 1. NHMRC is interested in your track record because: • Past success is assumed to be a good predictor of future success • If your team has all the skills and experience needed to undertake the project it is more likely to be successful and the risk is less
  • 2. The track record of the team • Cover all major areas of grant – what are the skill sets needed to make this grant a success • Pay special attention to ensuring adequate methodological skills – biostatistics, epidemiology, economics, qualitative research etc • Content knowledge/ capacity to work in the environment of the grant is important (eg indigenous research, primary care) • Demonstrate the track record in the background and research plan as well as the research achievements • Not all members of the team need a strong track record defined by funding and publication history
  • 3. Your track record Your publications • Number • Evidence of the significance of the publication (eg quality of the journal, citations, impact on policy or practice) • Your role in the publication • Relevance to the proposed project Your grant funding • Previous grant funding especially from NHMRC or ARC • Your role in the grant funding • Outcomes from the grant funding
  • 4. Your track record Your standing Evidence that you are regarded as a national or international leader (eg invitations to speak at international or significant national meetings, editorial appointments, specialist and high level health policy committee appointments); Other research-related achievements, Including influence on clinical/health policy or practice, provision of influential advice to health authorities and government, other impacts on health through community or industry
  • 5. Score 6 For example, relative to opportunity, the applicant(s): • Have a record of achievement that places them in the top 10-20% of peers/cohort • Are well recognized for their contribution to their field of research • Have a growing international reputation • Have established a position of leadership, or are emerging leaders, in their field • Hold leadership positions in well regarded scientific or professional societies
  • 6. Score 5 For example, relative to opportunity, the applicant(s): • Have a record of achievement, that places them well above average for their peers/cohort • Are well recognized for their contribution to their field of research • Have a growing national reputation and their research appears frequently at national meetings
  • 7. Score 4 For example, relative to opportunity, the applicant(s): • Have a solid record of achievement • Have made contributions to their field of research • One or more of the CIs has an existing or emerging national reputation, albeit in a niche area.
  • 8. Your track record: Painting the best picture • Track record is assessed relative to opportunity • Mention all relevant achievements (Nobel Prize) • Don’t pad (seminar at your University..…) • Use the whole grant to reflect your experience and expertise not just the research achievement sections (verbs are important here – lead vs helped with) • Can be helpful to have someone who knows you look at how your research achievements are being reflected

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