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Microsoft Connected Health Framework

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  • Business and User Process: Bring People and partners togetherShared Services and Technical Capabilities: Drive healthcare processes using business modeling in conjunction with the best of clinical care processesConnected Health Services Hub: Integrate the environment so that it interoperates efficiently and effectively Service Interface Components: Expose the components of the environment to the environment for use by other applicationsBusiness Components: Bring together all the bits of the environment to be usedData Access Services: Allow access to the data that is needed Operations management: Maintain the Service Level Agreements and Key Performance IndicatorsCommunication Services: Allow information to flow freely and effectively Security Services: At all points incorporate Privacy and Security
  • Shared Services and Technical Capabilities: Drive healthcare processes using business modeling in conjunction with the best of clinical care processesConnected Health Services Hub: Integrate the environment so that it interoperates efficiently and effectively Service Interface Components: Expose the components of the environment to the environment for use by other applicationsBusiness Components: Bring together all the bits of the environment to be usedData Access Services: Allow access to the data that is needed Operations management: Maintain the Service Level Agreements and Key Performance IndicatorsCommunication Services: Allow information to flow freely and effectively Security Services: At all points incorporate Privacy and Security
  • Business and User Process: Bring People and partners togetherShared Services and Technical Capabilities: Drive healthcare processes using business modeling in conjunction with the best of clinical care processesConnected Health Services Hub: Integrate the environment so that it interoperates efficiently and effectively Service Interface Components: Expose the components of the environment to the environment for use by other applicationsBusiness Components: Bring together all the bits of the environment to be usedData Access Services: Allow access to the data that is needed Operations management: Maintain the Service Level Agreements and Key Performance IndicatorsCommunication Services: Allow information to flow freely and effectively Security Services: At all points incorporate Privacy and Security
  • There are FOUR builds on this slide:Decisions on where patient clinical data is stored and how it is accessed are strongly influenced by legal, policy and organisational constraints – technical considerations and optimisation are secondaryCentralised modelFederated modelHybrid model is the most flexible and inclusive, combining the advantages of the previous two (and including them as boundary cases – from 0 to 100% centralised data)
  • What is the Connected Health Framework?The Connected Health Framework is Microsoft’s multi-year world-wide industry strategy, encompassing our industry solutions, partner strategy, platform offering and policy initiatives. What is the Connected Health Framework – Architecture and Design Blueprint?The Connected Health Framework – Architecture and Design Blueprint represents a vendor agnostic, set of best practices and approach based on Services Oriented Architecture (SOA), for architecting e-Health solutions for health information networks ranging from within healthcare organizations to across multiple government agencies. What is the Microsoft Connected Health Platform?The MicrosoftConnected Health Platform is Microsoft technology offering and prescriptive architecture guidance for e-Health solutions built on the Microsoft platform. What is the Health Connection Engine?The Health Connection Engine (HCE) is a reference implementation part of Microsoft’s Connected Health Platform. HCE accelerates the deployment of solutions based on the guidance in the CHF – Architecture and Design Blueprint.
  • Slide with animation: see in presentation mode.-Click through to represent how an XDS type document flows through the HIN: first as it is shared by a provider/agency, and then it is queried and retrieved by another provider/agency. -The final build highlights the different components of the HIN solution: The adapters (File system API, Azyxxi, Sharepoint/ECM), The Reference Implementation (Registry & Repository), and the management tools.
  • The key challenges faced by clinical applications:Consistent Navigation: it is evident from the screen-shots from a range of primary and secondary care applications that they all look very different in terms of layout, information presentation and structure, visual design etc. An electronic patient record is a complex structure and users need to be able to find their way around it quickly and efficiently. Fast and Efficient Data Entry: clinicians are time-constrained with regards to their interactions with patients e.g. An average consultation in primary care is about 8 minutes. In this time the clinician has to familiarise himself with the patients records, carry out the consultation, and determine the most appropriate course of action. The ability of the application to support this interaction in a quick ,clear, and safe way is critical. Where possible the application should make best use of technology to make data search, selection, and entry as easy to use as possible. Role and Context Sensitive UI: the application needs to provide the clinician with information that reflects their role, level within the organisation, and their particular context at any point in time e.g. The information needs of a clinician operating a specialist clinic are different to that same clinician responsible for a general ward. The application needs to draw in the contextual information in terms on relevant choices that are presented on the UI, decision support guidance, and relevancy of knowledge support too. User Task-driven: in an environment where patient safety is critical, the application needs to support the tasks the user is engaged in such that it reflects what needs to be done in a clear and simple a manner as possible; meeting user expectations by reflecting how they work or need to perform certain tasks makes an application easier to learn and use, and hence safer.Managing Complexity of Information: this ties in very closely with the need to have an application structure that is easy to navigate and conceptually understand. A patient record, particularly one that is complex in terms of clinical episodes, issues etc. is likely to have a range of different care providers who have dealt with a range of different medical conditions, and made a whole range of different – but relevant to them – associations between different items. The application needs to be able to support the clinician in managing this volume and complexity of data in a way that enables them to move around in both a structured and un-structured way as they build up their own understanding of the patient and how best to provide care for them. Seamless Device-Independent Experiences: clinicians are likely to have to access patient records across a range of different devices in a range of environments...from desktop machines to COWs (computers on wheels) to hand-held devices such as Tablets and PDA’s. Their experience across each of these needs to be seamless and disconnected, while at the same time benefiting from the advantages that each device type provides: e.g. a Tablet device needs to handle orientation, stylus entry, support free-form input, right-click functionality, user-sharing , user-handedness (in addition to safety aspects such as user access, cleanability etc.)
  • We approach each piece of work by defining a set of user stories and scenarios which encapsulate the key requirements and help in driving a common and shared understanding for each piece of work. Central to each scenario is the context of creating a safe and usable clinical user experience. This is further embodied in the following key considerations: Compelling User Interface: central to creating an positive and rewarding experience for the user is creating a UI that is easy to use, appears intuitive, and supports the user in their goals and tasks. E.g. considerations include demonstrating awareness of obviously who the user is, but also where they are and what they are doing in order to provide a more focused experience that does not distract them from what they are doing. An unstated goal is to create a ‘reflective’ experience for the user such that they feel good about themselves through the very act of interacting with the application. Fast and Effective User Interaction: where possible the UI should support the user in making their task easier and less laborious e.g. Through auto-populating of fields to minimise data entry, supporting the use of keyboard shortcuts so that the patient-clinician interaction is not overly de-sensitised by the clinician being absorbed by needing to work on the computer; supporting the use of a tablet device relying on the stylus and modal on-screen keyboard for interaction; and perhaps most importantly providing the user with relevant options at the right time. This will all help to ensure that the PC device or the application does not become a barrier to providing care but rather is an enabler. Benefiting from Latest Technology Developments: it is important to harness the power of the computer through decision and knowledge support that provides guidance and information to the user helping them to make better decisions on the care of the patient. Additionally, we are now in a position to take advantage of increases in processing power and graphical capabilities of PC’s to provide richer, more immersive experiences e.g. Users now have the ability to view images in 3-D, distinguish between different types of tissue, etc. This, when coupled together with new and dynamic ways of bringing this data to life enhances the understanding and appreciation of the clinician regarding the care they are providing to the patient. Consistent Navigation and Layout: providing users with familiar models of interaction and layout will ensure that the system is easy to learn and use because it draws on already familiar experiences of interacting with UI’s. In this regard, we recognise that Microsoft Windows and Microsoft Office have been extremely influential in setting up and normalising the UI standards we are all familiar with today. Presenting the user with models and areas of functionality that rely on layout and navigation paradigms with which they are already familiar ensures the system is not only easier to use but also safer too. Safer by Design: by placing the needs of the user at the heart of the design process we ensure that their needs and requirements take centre-stage with respect to the recommendations and guidance we provide. Real end-users are intimately involved in determining the requirements and shaping them as they evolve over time, they are involved in regular reviews and in formal usability testing sessions as the design guidance evolves from a loose understanding of what needs to be done to very firm guidance on particular items. When this is coupled with supporting research – both of the literature but also through observations of users at work in their real environment – the level of confidence we have in the recommendations goes up considerably. We further support the quality of the guidance we provide by running formal safety and hazard assessments with specialists trained in assessing the risk associated with particular areas of functionality. This process is formalised for each work item so that it is not only part of the delivery plan but also of the final acceptance of the deliverable.

Microsoft Connected Health Framework Microsoft Connected Health Framework Presentation Transcript

  • Microsoft Connected Health Platform A Foundation for Service Oriented Health Industry Solutions Dr Ilia Fortunov Industry Technology Strategist - EMEA Microsoft Worldwide Health
  • Connected Health Framework Vision Define an overarching framework for Health Industry Architecture – Best practices for service oriented health information integration and collaboration architectures • Enterprise-, state-, province- and country-wide projects • Leverage available assets to deliver more value faster • Based on open standards and protocols – platform-agnostic – Develop ecosystem of CHF-enabled solutions • Deliver value for customers faster and at lower cost • Frame of reference for partners solutions • Easier integration across multiple solution areas Microsoft Connected Health Framework 2
  • Connected Health Framework Business Framework • The CHF Business Framework uses a service oriented approach to – Define business components and major subject areas – Offer a range of services that can be “orchestrated” to enable and support business processes – Leverage existing sources of functionality and information • It provides a Business Pattern for Health Microsoft Connected Health Framework 3 View slide
  • Business Framework Communications Operations Management Security User Processes Business Processes Connected Health Services Hub Service Interface Components Patients Patient Events Patient Consents Health Subjects Care Clinical GP & Hospital Appointments Pathways Processes Systems Access Healthcare Professional Professional Professional Professionals Groups & Teams Permissions Access History Business Components Data Access Logic Components Databases Microsoft Connected Health Framework 5 View slide
  • Connected Health Framework Technical Framework • The CHF Technical Framework addresses: – Multiplicity of services, sources of data and systems – Management of patient and clinician identity – Integration across multiple systems – Flexibility and agility – Security – Scalability, Performance and Availability • It provides a Reference Architecture for Health Microsoft Connected Health Framework 6
  • Technical Framework Communication Operations Management Security Collaboration, Presentation and Point of Access, Identity Management, Privacy and Security Services Service Publication and Location, Shared Services Connected Health Services Hub Integration Services Service Component Interface Business Components Data Services System Management Services Communication Services Microsoft Connected Health Framework 7
  • Connected Health Framework Architecture Communication Operations Management Security Collaboration Services Presentation and Point of Access Services User Processes AGILE Identity Management Services Privacy and Security Services Service Publication and Location Business Processes Shared Services Connected Health Services Hub Integration Services Service Component Interface STABLE Business Components Data Access Logic Components Data Services System Management Services Communication Services
  • Options For Storing Clinical Data Mostly a matter of ownership and policy • Centralized model – Central repository holds replica of full health record – Clinical Data Exchange (CDX) Gateway publishes full health record and manages data synchronization • Federated model – Central repository holds no personal data – CDX Gateway publishes registration events and caches full record obtained from multiple sources • Hybrid model – Central repository holds record summary – CDX Gateway publishes record summary and caches full record – Could be multi-tier, with many data stores Microsoft Connected Health Framework 9
  • Flexibility in Deployment Microsoft Connected Health Framework 10
  • CHF Ecosystem – Who does what? Communication Operations Management Security Collaboration Services Presentation and Point of Access Services SI Partner Provided Identity Management Services User Processes Customer Specific (MS provides Reference Architecture Privacy and Security Services and SDKs) (MS provides Guidelines, Platform Products, Assistance) Service Publication and Location Business Processes Shared Services Connected Health Services Hub MS or SI Partner Provided Integration Services ISV Provided Service Component Interface (MS provides Business Pattern – Componentsand Service Definitions) Business Component Data Access Logic Components Data Services ISV or SI Partner Provided SI Partner Provided System Management Services (MS provides platform and guidance) (MS provides Reference Architecture and SDKs) Communication Services 12
  • Building Solutions Using the CHF Blueprint • Key scenarios depending on the role: – Customer - Formulating Requirements (RFP) – Vendor/Systems Integrator - Meeting Requirements (Responding to an RFP) – Software Vendor - Aligning an ISV Application with the CHF – Infrastructure provider - Establishing the Environment • CHF (Part 4) provides guidance for each, e.g.: – Understanding Scope & Boundaries – Understanding the Required Features – Deriving the Architecture – Defining the Solution Microsoft Connected Health Framework 13
  • Connected Health Framework: Levels and Components • Connected Health Framework is Microsoft’s multi-year world-wide industry strategy, encompassing our industry solutions, partner strategy, platform offering and policy initiatives. • Connected Health Framework – Architecture and Design Blueprint offers a set of vendor-agnostic best practices and guidelines for building the next generation of interoperable e-Health solutions based on a service-oriented architecture (SOA) and industry standards – ranging from within healthcare organizations to regional, national and cross-agency systems • Microsoft Connected Health Platform is Microsoft technology offering and prescriptive architecture guidance for e-Health solutions built on the Microsoft platform – Health Connection Engine (HCE) – Common User Interface (CUI) – … etc. Microsoft Connected Health Framework 14
  • Microsoft’s Connected Health Platform Communication Operations Management Security Windows Mobile Collaboration Services Office System, LiveMeeting, Presentation and Point of Access Services Exchange, Identity Management Services User Processes Windows Server System Privacy and Security Services Office System Service Publication and Location Business Processes Shared Services Connected Health Services Hub BizTalk Server, .NET Framework Integration Services Service Component Interface Visual Studio, Components Business .NET Framework Data Access Logic Components Data Services System Management Services Operations Manager, SQL Server System Center Communication Services
  • Reference Implementations • Health Connection Engine (HCE) – Community project on http://www.CodePlex.com/hce – Accelerates the development and deployment of connected solutions • Adapters SDK • Standard set of Web Services – Based on BizTalk, SQL Server and the .NET Framework • Microsoft Common Health User Interface (MSCUI) – Available at http://www.mscui.net – Community project on http://www.CodePlex.com/mscui – Facilitates development of consistent and safe clinical user interfaces – Based on .NET Framework • IHE Cross-Enterprise Document Sharing-b (XDS.b) – Community project on http://www.CodePlex.com/ihe – Implements standard IHE Integration Profile to facilitate sharing of clinical and health documents – Based on .NET Framework and SQL Server Microsoft Connected Health Framework 16
  • Health Connection Engine (HCE) • Community project on http://www.CodePlex.com/hce • Accelerates the development and deployment of connected solutions – Adapters SDK – Standard set of Web Services • Based on BizTalk, SQL Server and the .NET Framework • First reference implementation in line with the Connected Health Framework – Architecture and Design Blueprint • Developed in partnership with SIMPL Health (NZ) Microsoft Connected Health Framework 17
  • Health Connection Engine Communication Operations Management Security Collaboration Services Presentation and Point of Access Services Identity Management Services User Processes Privacy and Security Services HCE Services and Service Publication and Location Business Processes Registries Shared Services Connected Health Services Hub Messaging Management Services Integration Services Adapters Service Component Interface Business Components Data Access Logic Components Data Services Messaging ManagementServices System Management Services Communication Services
  • Microsoft IHE XDS.b Reference Implementation IHE/XDS Reference Implementation Registry 3. Consumers search for documents with specific information Adapters 2. Repository registers the documents metadata and pointer with the Registry 4. Consumers retrieve documents from Repository(ies) 1. Sources post document packages to the Repository XDS Document (Metadata): Origin of Type Documents Repository Patient Adapters Author Package Tools: Auditing - Reporting Facility Access - Configuration Authenticator …
  • Connected Health Accelerator Common User Interface
  • Clinical User Interface Fundamentals Operational considerations: smart-client…web-based…multi-device… Microsoft Connected Health Framework 22
  • Compelling User Interface Easy and intuitive to user Easy to learn User goal-driven workflow Fast and Effective User Interaction Optimised for multiple styles of interaction e.g. keyboard, mouse, stylus Auto-populate to minimize data entry Present relevant options at the right time Leveraging Technology Developments Creating a Safe Intelligent systems behaviour Built-in decision and knowledge support Useable Clinical UI Context-sensitive information presentation “Safe by Design” Consistent Navigation and Layout User-centred iterative design Based on established norms and standards process Draws on generally accepted best practice Built in safety and hazard design assessments Strong familiarity between different Evidence based recommendations applications Reduces cognitive load on user Microsoft Connected Health Framework 23
  • Common User Interface Communication Operations Management Security Collaboration Services User Interface User Interface Presentation and Point of Access Services Components Components Identity Management Services User Processes Privacy and Security Services Service Publication and Location Business Processes Medical Research and Shared Services Reference Services Connected Health Services Hub Integration Services Service Component Interface Business Components Data Access Logic Components Data Services System Management Services Communication Services
  • Medical Research Services
  • Clinical Application - Demonstrator Microsoft Connected Health Framework 28
  • Clinical Application - Design Guidance Microsoft Connected Health Framework 29
  • Resources and Next Steps • The Connected Health Framework – Architecture and Design Blueprint is available now – More details on http://msdn.microsoft.com/health – Contact your local Microsoft subsidiary or health@microsoft.com to engage – Provide feedback and discuss on http://SolShare.net • Understand the Health Connection Engine – Submit bugs and feature requests – Contribute to the development • Think service oriented business and technical architectures – Leverage Microsoft’s platform for security, collaboration, management, integration… Microsoft Connected Health Framework 30
  • © 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Vista and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries. The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.