Master's Degree in Molecular Biotechnology

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  • Suggested change in title; typo fixed “Dept of Info…”
  • Suggested change in title and 3rd and 4th bullet
  • New slide. This is needed upfront; please help out on the description; maybe slightly hyped, but we need to hook ‘em before we can teach ‘em.
    MR I reformatted a bit
  • New slide. Reworded points a bit
  • Added element – we also want to attract some ChemEs, Materials Science types, etc.
  • Added a little more richness to “business”
  • We’ve been saying “Master’s;” made it more prominent; changed 2nd bullet to give more detail on our business side
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    http://www.mae.cornell.edu/Erickson/research.html
    http://strc.herts.ac.uk/mm/red-blood-cell-analysis.html
  • New slide. Reworded points a bit
  • Added “Commercialization” to emphasize the program end goal and also the last offering in the business segment
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  • Slight revision for aesthetics
  • Slight revision for aesthetics
  • Added “Commercialization” to emphasize the program end goal and also the last offering in the business segment
  • Broadened degree descriptions in 1st bullet; regarding last entry, are we going to be ready for them to go to a website on Wed?
  • Added “Commercialization” to emphasize the program end goal and also the last offering in the business segment
  • Master's Degree in Molecular Biotechnology

    1. 1. 2007 Annual Meeting Northeastern Association of Graduate Schools A Professional Science Master’s Degree in Molecular Biotechnology Ali Eskandarian Associate Dean, College of Professional Studies The George Washington University March 22, 2007
    2. 2. 2 Outline • A Brief history of the CGS/Sloan grant at GW – Why Molecular Biotechnology? • Necessary partnerships – External and internal • Marketing and recruitment – More marketing • Addressing the difficulties
    3. 3. 3 A Brief History • Sloan and Ford grants at CGS – Financial Mathematics, Proteomics, Dual diagnosis (substance abuse and mental illness), Museum & social service, Fine art and art appraisal • From Planning to Implementation – Molecular Biotechnology • Housing the degree inside the institution – College of Professional Studies
    4. 4. 4 Partnerships • Internal partnerships – Champions among the faculty – A friendly central administration – Anticipating the obstacles • External partnerships – Essential for internships – Helpful in grounding the curriculum in marketplace realities – Helpful in marketing the program to both internal and external constituents
    5. 5. 5 Marketing & Recruitment • Internal efforts – Never enough resources, use every tool available – direct mail, advertising, poster and brochure production, info sessions, web presence, press release, visits to other institutions – Establish a dialog between the key faculty and the marketing reps as early as possible • External efforts – CGS, Congress, Associations …and more
    6. 6. 6 Difficulties • Administrative nightmares – Faculty ownership, course ownership, etc. • Student preparation – Background non-uniformity, and remedies? • Advising and mentoring – Advising early and often by faculty – Mentoring and help from students – Strategies for cohesion (topical seminars)
    7. 7. 7 The End Any Questions? Would you like to review (quickly) what we present in our Info Sessions?
    8. 8. College of Professional Studies The George Washington University Thanks for joining us. The session will begin shortly. A New Master’s Degree inA New Master’s Degree in Molecular BiotechnologyMolecular Biotechnology Unique Preparation for a Biotech CareerUnique Preparation for a Biotech Career
    9. 9. 9 Faculty Leadership GroupFaculty Leadership Group Ali Eskandarian, Ph.D.Ali Eskandarian, Ph.D. Associate Dean College of Professional Studies ali.eskandarian@gwu.edu (202) 994-8192 Mark Reeves, Ph.D.Mark Reeves, Ph.D. Program Director and Professor Department of Physics Columbian College of Arts and Sciences reevesme@gwu.edu (202) 994-6279 Richard Donnelly, Ph.D.Richard Donnelly, Ph.D. Program Co-director, Chair and Professor Department of Information Systems and Technology Management School of Business rgd@gwu.edu (202) 994-7155
    10. 10. 10 The George Washington University • Established in 1821 by Congressional Charter • 9 Schools, including the College of Professional Studies (CPS) • Over 20,000 students – including 10,000 graduate and professional students • Campuses at Foggy Bottom & Mt. Vernon (DC) and Loudoun County (Virginia) • Graduate Centers in Alexandria, Arlington, Ashburn, and Hampton Roads, Virginia • Contract programs for corporate and government clients offered on site
    11. 11. 11 The Biotech Revolution!The Biotech Revolution! • Biology is undergoing profound changes and the biotechnology industry is a strong disruptive force. • The biotech/medical device industry is the fastest growing in the United States today. • Universities and industry now collaborate very effectively in applied science areas. • The impact is global and profound, and a new educational approach is needed to keep up. “The dominant science of the 21st century will be biology” – Freeman Dyson, physicist, futurist and Templeton prize winner
    12. 12. 12 Why Molecular Biotechnology?Why Molecular Biotechnology? • Winning concepts for new technologies and devices emerge from imaginative exploitation of discoveries in biological science and physics. • Successful biotech products and processes are developed through effective integration of math, computer science and engineering. • Greatly enhanced innovation in biotechnology is achieved through incorporation of appropriate business strategies and methods.
    13. 13. 13 Why a Master’s in Molecular Biotechnology?Why a Master’s in Molecular Biotechnology? • A Science Bachelor’s degree is inadequate preparation for meaningful placement in Biotech. • The common next step in science, the Ph.D., is a big step, intended as preparation for a research career. • GW’s new Professional Master’s degree is the right preparation for entry into the biotechnology field, or later for a Ph.D. • GW’s Master’s in Molecular Biotechnology (MMB) appropriately cuts across the disciplines of physics, biology and business, as a traditional Master’s cannot.
    14. 14. 14 Traditional Academic DisciplinesTraditional Academic Disciplines Physics Chemistry Biology Math StatisticsComputing Applied Science & Engineering
    15. 15. 15 New Interdisciplinary BiotechNew Interdisciplinary Biotech Systems Biology Physics of Biotech Devices Computer Science & Informatics Business & Innovation
    16. 16. 16 Educational Objectives of GW’s MMBEducational Objectives of GW’s MMB • Build on basic principles in molecular biology, device physics, and modeling for the development of innovative new technologies and products. • Integrate scientific and technical expertise with successful business practices in technology management and innovation. • Develop effective team work and leadership skills in projects focused on new product development and technology venture concept creation. • Apply classroom learning in structured internships with well-defined projects and goals in local industry, government and non-profit entities.
    17. 17. 17 Cyclin-Cdk binding in cell cycleCyclin-Cdk binding in cell cycle Biology Doubling DNA Cell Growth Cell Division (Mitosis) R Cell Division (Mitosis) – depends upon Cdk2-cyclin binding
    18. 18. 18 Biology Medicine Cyclin-Cdk binding in cell cycleCyclin-Cdk binding in cell cycle HIV Genome Cdk-Cyclin binding is essential for HIV-1 Replication
    19. 19. 19 Biology Cyclin-Cdk binding in cell cycleCyclin-Cdk binding in cell cycle Medicine Cdk Cyclin A) B) Cdk Cyclin Cdk Cyclin A) Cdk Cyclin A) B) Cdk Cyclin B) Cdk Cyclin Computational Prediction: Small peptide fits into binding Cdk binding site Cyclin-Cdk complex can’t form (Physics) Physics Cdk Cyclin A) B) Cdk Cdk Cyclin A) Cdk Cyclin A) B) Cdk B) Cdk
    20. 20. 20 Biology Cyclin-Cdk binding in cell cycleCyclin-Cdk binding in cell cycle Medicine Physics Cdk Cyclin A) B) Cdk Cdk Cyclin A) Cdk Cyclin A) B) Cdk B) Cdk PBMC Infection (HIV-1 UG/92/029, SI) 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 0 6 12 18 24 Days Post Infection p24(pg/ml) PBMC PBMC + SI PBMC + SI + WT peptide PBMC + SI + 41/44 peptide ~ 95% HIV activity suppression GW Medical School Biochem F. Kashanchi, GWU, MC
    21. 21. 21 Technological response (vaccine development) Biology Medicine Physics Cdk Cyclin A) B) Cdk Cdk Cyclin A) Cdk Cyclin A) B) Cdk B) Cdk Biochem Successful Innovation is not AssuredSuccessful Innovation is not Assured Discovery . . . Development . . . Deployment • Scientific discovery is only the first step • Additional R&D may lead to a prototype • Prototype trials may lead to market launch • Launch may lead to commercial success As innovation proceeds, business decision- making and technology management play a greater and greater role, for good or bad. Business
    22. 22. 22 Business Cases You’ll Learn to AddressBusiness Cases You’ll Learn to Address Learn to Avoid and Repair . . . Case: Promising discoveries are repeatedly ignored by management, and an industry leader declines. Case: A slow, mistake-ridden development project kills what would have been a successful new product. Learn to Identify and Promote . . . Case: A team of scientists develops a strong venture concept and gives birth to a future industry giant. Case: Powerful innovation assessment tools are used to identify opportunities and successfully exploit them.
    23. 23. 23 Curriculum HighlightsCurriculum Highlights • Physics of Biotechnology focuses on the connection between understanding basic knowledge and applying that knowledge to the development of new devices. • Genomics, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics are at the forefront of the biotechnology revolution, providing new insights about the biodiversity of life on our planet, and impacting biomedical research by leading the way to new therapies for genetic and microbial diseases.
    24. 24. 24 Curriculum HighlightsCurriculum Highlights • Management of Innovation equips students with methods useful in identifying opportunities and developing new technical products, including new management approaches and key ethical issues. • Technology Entrepreneurship/Intrapreneurship emphasizes the creation of new biotechnology ventures and developing new business proposals within firms. Technology Commercialization focuses on competitive analysis, shortening time- to-market, and marketing biotechnology products.
    25. 25. 25 Curriculum HighlightsCurriculum Highlights THE CAPSTONE PROJECT Students integrate the knowledge and skills learned in the Molecular Biotechnology program in a six- to twelve-month project tackling real industry problems through either independent guided research and writing or team projects.
    26. 26. 26 Sample Course ScheduleSample Course Schedule Year One Fall 2007 PSMB 263: Management of Innovation (3) Preparatory content (6 credit-hours of the following): BiSc 102: Cell Biology (3) Phys 165: Electromagnetism (3) Csci 144: Introduction to Bioinformatics (3) Spring 2008 PSMB 261: Physics of Biotechnology I (3) Phys 128: Biophysics: Physics in Life Sciences (3) Phys 281: Computational Physics (modeling) (3) Summer 2008 PSMB 264: Technology Entrepreneurship & Intrapreneurship (3) PSMB 262: Physics of Biotechnology II (2)
    27. 27. 27 Sample Course ScheduleSample Course Schedule Year Two Fall 2008 PSMB 265: Commercialization of Science and Technology (2) Bioc 236: Fundamentals of Genomics and Proteomics I (2) Bioc 254: Fundamentals of Molecular Biology (3) Phys 243: Solid-State Physics: Structure and Binding (3) Spring 2009 PSMB 266: Capstone Project (1) Bioc 237: Fundamentals of Genomics and Proteomics II (2) CSci 207: Scientific Databases (3)
    28. 28. 28 Careers in Molecular BiotechnologyCareers in Molecular Biotechnology At the lab bench: new devices electronics sensors vaccines drug delivery biochemistry genetic engineering You will develop the working knowledge to move flexibly between the lab bench and biotechnology management. In management: new product concepts project management product marketing product line management entrepreneurship venture capital consulting
    29. 29. 29 • Bachelor’s degree in a relevant field of science, applied science or engineering • Minimum GPA of 3.0 • GRE results • Statement of purpose • At least two letters of recommendation • Admissions decisions on rolling basis For additional information, please visit www.gwu.edu/gradinfo AdmissionsAdmissions
    30. 30. 30 Mark Reeves Program Director reevesme@gwu.edu Richard Donnelly Program Co-director rgd@gwu.edu Lynn Griffin Program Representative griffinl@gwu.edu College of Professional Studies The George Washington University 805 21st Street NW, Suite 301 Washington, DC 20052 202-994-2083 Fax: 202-994-7718 Program ContactsProgram Contacts
    31. 31. 31 • GWU Information (202) 994-4949 • Admissions Office (202) 994-6210 • Financial Aid Office (202) 994-6620 • Registrar’s Office (202) 994-4900 • Veteran’s Benefits (202) 994-4925 • On the web http://www.cps.gwu.edu Additional ContactsAdditional Contacts
    32. 32. 32 Careers in Molecular BiotechnologyCareers in Molecular Biotechnology At the lab bench: new devices electronics sensors vaccines drug delivery biochemistry genetic engineering You will develop the working knowledge to move flexibly between the lab bench and biotechnology management. In management: new product concepts project management product marketing product line management entrepreneurship venture capital consulting

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