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Building the Biotechnology
Sector in Houston
• Introduction
• Houston Biotechnology
Atmosphere
• Why so few companies?
• P...
Building the Biotechnology
Sector in Houston
• Introduction
• Houston Biotechnology
Atmosphere
• Why so few companies?
• P...
Building the Biotechnology
Sector in Houston
• Introduction
• Houston Biotechnology
Atmosphere
• Why so few companies?
• P...
BioHouston Background
Non-profit 501(c)3 founded by
Houston-area research institutions
to develop the Houston region –
def...
Regional Research Strength from
College Station to Galveston
• Texas Medical Center
– Largest medical center in the world;...
Leading Medical Institutions in the U.S.
World Class Research Institutions
Baylor College of Medicine
• #1 in Pediatric Re...
Other Selected Centers of Excellence
• Gulf Coast Consortium for
Bioinformatics
• Gulf Coast Center for
Computational Canc...
Source: Battelle Memorial Institute and the State Science
and Technology Institute study
Research Leadership
• Historical ...
Houston region highlights
• Total annual academic research investments exceed
$1.5 billion
• 140+ life science companies
•...
Best Biotech Fields for Houston to Grow
Oncology
Neuroscience
Metabolic
Diseases
Biodefense /
Infectious
Disease
Cardiovas...
Texas Emerging Technology Fund
• Initiated in 2005.
• $175 million in funds available
• $52.9 million in total statewide l...
$3 Billion Cancer Research Initiative
Approved in November 2007
• Established Cancer Prevention and Research Institute
of ...
Tanox
A 20-year and $919 Million Journey to Success
• The Houston region is home to the 2
largest IPO’s in biotech history:
– Tanox: Acquired by Genentech for $919
million in...
Texas Life Science Conference
• Largest investment conference in Southwestern U.S.
• 2007 Conference
– More than $6 billio...
Why Houston?
“Nowhere in the country is there such
research infrastructure, scientific
leadership, and patient numbers in ...
Building the Biotechnology
Sector in Houston
• Introduction
• Houston Biotechnology
Atmosphere
• Why so few companies?
• P...
Why so few companies?
• Everybody wants to be “the next San Diego”.
• Institutions doing more development.
• Easier to exp...
Building the Biotechnology
Sector in Houston
• Introduction
• Houston Biotechnology
Atmosphere
• Why so few companies?
• P...
Possible solutions
• Support pump priming efforts
• Insist on regional cooperation
• Strategic recruiting
• Monitor the ET...
Building the Biotechnology - PowerPoint Presentation
Building the Biotechnology - PowerPoint Presentation
Building the Biotechnology - PowerPoint Presentation
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Building the Biotechnology - PowerPoint Presentation

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    Dr. Chang began her research in the BCM department of Virology and Molecular Biology and initially focused on development of an AIDS vaccine, publishing an important paper in 1987.
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  • Transcript of "Building the Biotechnology - PowerPoint Presentation"

    1. 1. Building the Biotechnology Sector in Houston • Introduction • Houston Biotechnology Atmosphere • Why so few companies? • Possible solutions
    2. 2. Building the Biotechnology Sector in Houston • Introduction • Houston Biotechnology Atmosphere • Why so few companies? • Possible solutions
    3. 3. Building the Biotechnology Sector in Houston • Introduction • Houston Biotechnology Atmosphere • Why so few companies? • Possible solutions
    4. 4. BioHouston Background Non-profit 501(c)3 founded by Houston-area research institutions to develop the Houston region – defined as College Station, to The Woodlands, to Galveston Northcut MendelsohnGillis
    5. 5. Regional Research Strength from College Station to Galveston • Texas Medical Center – Largest medical center in the world; 42+ member institutions – $2.1 billion spent for additions to facilities from 2002-2004 – 800+ acres; 100+ permanent buildings – Ground broken for The University of Texas Research Park • Texas A&M University-College Station – Ranked 11th by NSF for total research and development expenditures – 5,200+ acres, including a 324-acre research park – 2.5M+ square feet of research space • University of Texas Medical Branch-Galveston – Ranked 19th of 121 medical schools in NIH funding – 84 acres; 77 major buildings – 385k+ square feet of research space  Massive but under-recognized research and commercialization assets
    6. 6. Leading Medical Institutions in the U.S. World Class Research Institutions Baylor College of Medicine • #1 in Pediatric Research funding-NIH (with TCH) • #11 in NIH Awards to Med Schools-NIH • #13 Research Intensive Medical Schools The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center • #1 in Oncology • #5 in Gynecology • #10 in Urology • #10 in Ear, Nose and Throat • #10 in Rehabilitation The University of Texas Medical Branch • 1 of 2 Infectious Disease and Biodefense National Laboratories • 1 of 6 Regional Centers of Excellence for Biodefense • #19 in NIH Awards to Med Schools-NIH Methodist Hospital • #10 in Neurology and Neurosurgery • #17 in Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery Rice University • #1 in Nanotechnology Commercialization The University of Texas Health Science Center School of Public Health • #1 in Health Education Texas Children’s Hospital • #1 in Pediatric Research funding-NIH (with BCM) • #4 in Pediatrics Texas Heart Institute • #9 in Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery University of Houston • #2 in Health Law Source: U.S. News and World Report, 2004, NIH database, Small Times
    7. 7. Other Selected Centers of Excellence • Gulf Coast Consortium for Bioinformatics • Gulf Coast Center for Computational Cancer Research • John S. Dunn, Se. GCC for Chemical Genomics • John S. Dunn, Sr. GCC For Magnetic Resonance • Gulf Coast Consortium for Membrane Biology • Gulf Coast Consortium for Protein Crystallography • Gulf Coast Consortium for Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience • Gulf Coast Consortium for Bioinformatics • Gulf Coast Center for Computational Cancer Research • John S. Dunn, Se. GCC for Chemical Genomics • John S. Dunn, Sr. GCC For Magnetic Resonance • Gulf Coast Consortium for Membrane Biology • Gulf Coast Consortium for Protein Crystallography • Gulf Coast Consortium for Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience Brown Foundation Institute for Molecular Medicine Brown Foundation Institute for Molecular Medicine
    8. 8. Source: Battelle Memorial Institute and the State Science and Technology Institute study Research Leadership • Historical firsts: – First multiple organ transplant – First identification of C60 – First draft of the human genome – One of two National Biocontainment Labs – First artificial artery – First successfully cloned companion animal – First total heart transplant • National Recognition: – Three Nobel laureates – 16 members of the National Academy of Sciences – Two Presidential Advisors – Hundreds of members of national academies • Next Generation of Leaders: – #2 in higher education degrees in bioscience – #3 for university expenditures in biosciences – 22,000+ biomedical students in the Texas Medical Center
    9. 9. Houston region highlights • Total annual academic research investments exceed $1.5 billion • 140+ life science companies • Number of companies has doubled since 2003 • Approximately 1/3 are therapeutic, 1/3 are device and 1/3 are tools and service providers • Recent VC investment activity in region
    10. 10. Best Biotech Fields for Houston to Grow Oncology Neuroscience Metabolic Diseases Biodefense / Infectious Disease Cardiovascular Medicine Genomics Genetics Nanotechnology
    11. 11. Texas Emerging Technology Fund • Initiated in 2005. • $175 million in funds available • $52.9 million in total statewide life science grants have been awarded or are currently under final review by State leadership • 9 Houston region life science companies have received grants for $10.1 million since inception • Texas Life Science Committee conducts extensive due diligence (business/science/IP) on technologies and companies before forwarding to leadership for final approvals
    12. 12. $3 Billion Cancer Research Initiative Approved in November 2007 • Established Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas • Peer reviewed distribution of up to $300 mm in grants per year over next decade • Every $1 invested will require $0.50 in matching spending by recipient organizations • Public and private educational institutions and medical research facilities will be eligible for grants • First investment expected in 2009
    13. 13. Tanox A 20-year and $919 Million Journey to Success
    14. 14. • The Houston region is home to the 2 largest IPO’s in biotech history: – Tanox: Acquired by Genentech for $919 million in 2007 – Lexicon Pharmaceuticals: Ten products in clinical pipeline Also… – Agennix: Developing drugs for cancer and diabetic ulcers; in late-stage trials for NSCLC – Cyberonics: VNSTherapy for epilepsy and depression – Introgen Therapeutics: In late-stage development of ADVEXIN to treat head and neck cancer – Repros Therapeutics: Lead drug Proeelex; IND will be submitted to initiate Phase 3 trials for Uterine Fibroid indications Snapshot of Success Introgen
    15. 15. Texas Life Science Conference • Largest investment conference in Southwestern U.S. • 2007 Conference – More than $6 billion in current funds in attendance – 50+ company presentations – Record attendance – Texas Governor Rick Perry addressed meeting • 2008 Conference will be held November 5-7
    16. 16. Why Houston? “Nowhere in the country is there such research infrastructure, scientific leadership, and patient numbers in such close proximity.”
    17. 17. Building the Biotechnology Sector in Houston • Introduction • Houston Biotechnology Atmosphere • Why so few companies? • Possible solutions
    18. 18. Why so few companies? • Everybody wants to be “the next San Diego”. • Institutions doing more development. • Easier to export ideas and talent. • Lack of experienced management. • No soft landing for failures. • Insufficient informed Venture Capital. • Unfamiliar value proposition.
    19. 19. Building the Biotechnology Sector in Houston • Introduction • Houston Biotechnology Atmosphere • Why so few companies? • Possible solutions
    20. 20. Possible solutions • Support pump priming efforts • Insist on regional cooperation • Strategic recruiting • Monitor the ETF and CPRIT $ • Philanthropic investments
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