Vitamin D In Eldery African American Women.Weaver.Napcrg06

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Vitamin D In Eldery African American Women.Weaver.Napcrg06

  1. 1. Vitamin D Deficiency in Elderly African-American Women Sally P. Weaver, PhD, MD † , Eugene Fung, MD * , Ben Collins ** , and Cindy Passmore, MA †† † McLennan County Medical Education and Research Foundation Family Practice Residency Program, Waco, Texas; * Arthritis and Osteoporosis Clinic, Waco, Texas; ** Baylor University, Waco, Texas; †† Faculty Development Center, Waco, TX <ul><li>Adequate vitamin D levels are required to maintain bone health (>32ng/mL) </li></ul><ul><li>Darker skin pigmentation and aging are known to decrease the ability to synthesize adequate vitamin D. </li></ul><ul><li>No studies have documented whether sun exposure in the southern US is adequate and/or will reduce the need for vitamin D supplements. </li></ul>To document whether elderly African-American women in Central Texas achieve or maintain adequate vitamin D levels in the springtime when taking the RDA 400 I.U. vitamin D supplement. BACKGROUND SPECIFIC AIM RESULTS CONCLUSIONS <ul><li>This is a prospective cohort study of 44 African-American women aged > 70 who do not have medical conditions that might affect vitamin D levels. </li></ul><ul><li>Patients had two visits six weeks apart from April to June. </li></ul><ul><li>Customary vitamin D supplementation is inadequate for increasing serum levels of vitamin D in elderly African-American women. </li></ul><ul><li>Springtime sun exposure in a southern latitude also appears inadequate for increasing vitamin D levels. </li></ul><ul><li>Osteopenia and osteoporosis are unexpectedly high in the study population. </li></ul>METHODS <ul><li>This study was funded in part by an unrestricted grant from Procter and Gamble Pharmaceuticals. </li></ul><ul><li>All patients were given 1000mg calcium with 400 I.U. vitamin D tablets daily during the study period. </li></ul><ul><li>Bone Mineral Density </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mean t-score of -1.7 [range +1.7 to -4.0] </li></ul></ul><ul><li>t-scores were not correlated with vitamin D levels. </li></ul><ul><li>79% were osteopenic or osteoporotic. </li></ul><ul><li>Sun Exposure - mean of 9.6 hours per week </li></ul><ul><li>Amount of sun exposure was not correlated with vitamin D levels or t-scores. </li></ul><ul><li>Vitamin D levels </li></ul><ul><li>84% had vitamin D levels <32ng/mL </li></ul><ul><li>A statistically significant increase of 3 ng/mL during the study period is not felt to be clinically significant. </li></ul><ul><li>Follow up levels ranged widely from a loss of 10ng/mL to a gain of 19ng/mL. </li></ul><ul><li>Patients were not told to make any changes in diet or sun exposure. </li></ul><ul><li>Mean age 75.7 yrs [range 70-88] </li></ul><ul><li>Mean BMI 32.71 [range 16.8-49.03] </li></ul><ul><li>82% completed the study. </li></ul>

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