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Media Planning & Buying (Traditional Media)

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Presented at TMKedu by Sean Galligan on July 16, 2014 …

Presented at TMKedu by Sean Galligan on July 16, 2014

Have you heard about traditional media but aren't quite sure what it is? This presentation shares how to plan and buy traditional media and will give you some context on why advertisers use it and how you should think about it. Each medium is different in its own way and this presentation explores the nuances of each and how they are adapting in today's digital landscape.

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  • 1. Planning + Buying Traditional Media TMKU
  • 2. 2 •What is traditional media? •TV •Radio •Print •OOH •Digital Amplification AGENDA
  • 3. WHAT IS TRADITIONAL MEDIA?
  • 4. 4 EVOLUTION OF MEDIA
  • 5. 5 TRADITIONAL MEDIA DEFINED?
  • 6. 6 OUR CLIENTS ANDWORKLOAD SKEW DIGITAL D IG ITA L 48% 10% 28% 11% 2% 1% SEA RCH TV PRIN T O O H RA D IO
  • 7. 7 THIS IS OURWORLD
  • 8. 8 NYC DOES NOT LOOK LIKE THE REST OF THE COUNTRY
  • 9. 9 WHILE DECLINING, TRADITIONAL TIME SPENT IS GREATER THAN DIGITAL TIME SPENT 6:43 Traditional v. 5:09 Digital Traditional time spent - 25%
  • 10. 10 AD SPENDING IS STARTING TO CATCH UP, BUT... Through 2017, TV spend is still predicted to be 23% higher than total digital spend
  • 11. 11 TV IS STILL SEEN AS THE MOST EFFECTIVE CHANNEL Source Against US Internet users, TV is still 10x more effective than internet advertising
  • 12. 12 YOU HAVE TO KNOW HOW TO PLAN IT
  • 13. 13 DON’T FRET - UNIVERSAL TRUTHS STILL APPLY •Who am I talking to? •What’s the best environment to reach them in? •Where can I find the greatest % of them? •What’s the most efficient way to reach them? •What’s the best place to be within the channel? •How do I use available info to make the best decisions? •How can I outsmart my competitors in this space? •What do I need to achieve to satisfy my business Targeting Environment Reach/Composition Efficiency Placement Data Competition Communication Goals
  • 14. PLANNING + BUYING TV
  • 15. 15 TIME SPENT 4 hours and 31 minutes per day -3% v. 2012
  • 16. 16 WHY TV? STRENGTHS •  Immediacy, impact, and broad reach •  Builds awareness quickly •  Dynamic message combining sight, sound, and motion •  Ability to select programming •  Efficient dayparts •  Geographic flexibility through use of Spot TV LIMITATIONS •  Clutter •  Increasingly fragmented viewership •  High out-of-pocket cost •  Increasing use of DVR/TiVo leads to time-shifted viewing •  Competitive restrictions TV best used: 1. To build broad-based reach 2. To capitalize on television’s audio/visual capabilities to showcase program content
  • 17. 17 BROADCAST SYNDICATION CABLE WAYS TOWATCH =WAYS TO BUY VOD FEPS TV DIGITAL
  • 18. 18 NATIONALV. LOCALV. DRTV
  • 19. 19 UPFRONTV. SCATTER Buying approach depends on the planning horizon, programming/flighting flexibility, and marketplace factors such as supply and demand The unsold national ad time on the broadcast and cable networks that remains after the up-front buying period. • Shorter lead-time • Offers more strategic flexibility • Ability to better align with specials and mid-season TV marketplace Upfront Approach Scatter Approach The first selling wave for the broadcast or cable networks. Usually occurs after the new fall schedules have been announced. • Longer lead-time • Broad selection of programming • Audience guarantees/protection • Favorable rates
  • 20. 20 HOWYOU BUY IT Live C3 (Live + 3 days) C7 (live + 7 days) CURRENCY A18-49 W18-34 A21-34 A35+ A25-54 DEMOGRAPHICS GROSS RATING POINT (GRP): THE PERCENT OF A SPECIFIC POPULATION GROUP THAT IS EXPOSED TO A PROGRAM 2.46 LIVE 4.41 LIVE+3 4.63 LIVE+7 COST STRUCTURE: CPP / CPM
  • 21. 21 BUYING V.TIME PERIODS Early Morning (6A - 9A) Morning (9A- 12P) Daytime (12P - 4P) Early Fringe (4P - 6P) Early Evening (6P - 7P) Prime Access (7P - 8P) Primetime (8P - 11P) Late Fringe (11P - 11:30P) Late Night (11:30p - 2A) Overnight (2A - 6A) DAYPART MIX Premieres Sweeps Finales Specials (VMAs, Oscars, Emmys) Holiday Super Bowl Holiday Weekends SEASONAL CONSIDERATIONS
  • 22. 22 BUYING PROCESS The Negotiation Stewardship Post Buy Analysis • Check avails • Estimating station projections • Current rates submitted by stations (CPPs) • Rate negotiation and D/D/T messaging allowance • Added value • Ensuring GRPs cleared • Confirming spots ran • Confirming delivered inventory matches what was purchased 6-8 weeks pre-campaign Campaign flight 90-days post campaign/ per quarter AGENCY PARTNER
  • 23. PLANNING + BUYING RADIO
  • 24. 24 TIME SPENT 1 hours and 26 minutes per day -6.5% v. 2012
  • 25. 25 WHY RADIO? STRENGTHS •  Create a local presence •  DJ mentions can make a brand more personal •  Excellent opportunities for added value •  Low out of pocket cost •  Low barrier to entry •  Immediacy and frequency LIMITATIONS •  Background medium, non-intrusive •  No visual or brand registration recall, audio exposure only •  Limited reach on a national basis •  Can be expensive to cover market Radio best used: 1. To take advantage of a :60 message platform 2. To add frequency to the media plan 3. To capitalize on the “local” nature of the medium
  • 26. 26 NETWORK LOCAL WAYS TO LISTEN =WAYS TO BUY ONLINE OVER AIR DIGITAL SATELLITE
  • 27. 27 NATIONALV. LOCAL •  Purchased by individual antenna reach (Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA)) with the ability to target through station selection •  Promotional opportunities at the local level •  Lower out-of-pocket costs than Network/National •  Offer geographic & creative flexibility by allowing different messages to run in different markets •  Networks own and sell commercial space in shows/events that are broadcast across a large network of local station markets •  Higher out-of-pocket cost •  Examples include: Syndicated shows, live concerts, Olympics, live sports, NPR Spot/Local RadioNetwork/National Radio Radio Primary Unit :30 Primary Unit :60 Local premium means look for the breakeven point
  • 28. 28 HOWYOU BUY IT AM Drive (6A - 10A) Day (10A - 3P) PM Drive (3P - 7P) Evening (7P - 12A) Overnight (12A - 7A) Weekend (6A - 12A) DAYPARTS Like TV, bought against age demographics A18-49 W18-34 A21-34 A35+ A25-54 GRPS AGENCY PARTNER CHR - Top 40 Urban Adult Contemporary Hot AC Urban Contemporary Classical News / Sports / Info Dance Easy Listening Jazz Talk Oldies Country FORMATS COST STRUCTURE: CPP / CPM
  • 29. PLANNING + BUYING PRINT
  • 30. 30 TIME SPENT 18 minutes per day -18% v. 2012 TIME SPENT 14 minutes per day -13% v. 2012
  • 31. 31 WHY MAGAZINES? STRENGTHS •  Selective audience targeting by demographics, lifestyles, interests, etc. •  Editorial flexibility and compatibility •  Long shelf life •  High quality reproduction can enhance brand and product image •  Detailed copy opportunity LIMITATIONS •  Relatively slow reach building •  Longer lead times •  Limited geographic flexibility •  Difficult to build frequency •  Slow readership cume Magazine best used: 1. To provide extended messaging 2. To effectively target specific lifestyles/interests 3. To reach light television viewers
  • 32. 32 CONSUMER B-TO-B SUNDAY MAGAZINE TYPES LOCAL IPAD TYPES DIGITAL
  • 33. 33 MAGAZINE UNITS Fractional: 1/3 Page Custom: Intrusion Cover Flap Gatefold 10 | TVGUIDE.COM INTHENEWS CLOCKWISEFROMTOPLEFT:MONTYBRINTON/CBS;CHRISHELCERMANAS-BENGE/ABC;TODDWILLIAMSON/WIREIMAGE;ERICMCCANDLESS/ABC IsDempseyLeavingGrey’s? IT’S DECISION TIME for Patrick Dempsey. His Grey’s Anatomy contract is up at the end of this season, and the actor has said he was ready to check out of Seattle Grace/Mercy West. But now he tells us he may sign on for one more rotation. —Franck Ragaine Areyougoingtocome back?It’sworthhavinga conversation.Ihaveafamily tosupport,andwhynot haveadiscussionabout continuing?The question is will I do a full season, a half season or come back at all? There are a lot of things I’d like to do: [car] racing, films…so if I’m able to balance all those things and continue on with the show, why not? There are so many other things than just the money. But it’s a nice position to be in. DoyouthinkDerek’spathoverthe pasteightyearsandthestories aroundhimmakesense?Oh,no,notat all.It’sverydifficulttokeepitfreshwhen you’redoing24episodesayear.[Creator] ShondaRhimeshasalotofideas,andshe isinapositionwhereshecantakemore chances.Sometimesthatworks, sometimesitdoesnot.Last yearwehadthesingingepi- sode,whichIthinkwasabig mistake.Butyouhavetotry. Are you happy with the adoption story? I’m very happy with the baby story.I’m glad it’s not about Meredith and Derek together,but it’s about them raising a child.Meredith always has tragedy around her that creates a lot of drama.It’s amazing that Derek continues to stand by her. But it’s good that they made the com- mitment to stay together. “It’s nice to have a job,” Dempsey says A 1954 TV GUIDE editorial suggested that the people responsible for loud commer- cials“should be sentenced to five years at hard labor in a boiler factory.”The Com- mercial Advertisement Loudness Mitiga- tion Act signed into law by President Obama won’t dole out that kind of pun- ishment—but it is the first regulation to address one of the longest-running issues viewers have.“We have received thou- sands of complaints,”says FCC chairman Julius Genachowski.“It’s a real concern among consumers.”TV stations,satellite companies and cable operators will have a year to comply with the new regulation that requires commercials and promos to be at the same volume level as program content; if they don’t,they can be subject to fines.While the FCC will do some spot checks,they will depend on viewers to make themselves heard above the noise and report possible violations.—SB FCCTurnsDown TVAds’Volume TheTVlandscapesawalotofbigchange(andbigdollars)in2011.Here are the stats on some major stories.—SB TheYearinNumbers Settlement received by Charlie Sheen from CBS and Warner Bros.Television after the actor sued over his firing from TwoandaHalfMen. Estimated hours spent on TV by Regis Philbin, who exited Live! With Regis and Kelly in November. Hours of coverage E! devoted to Kim Kardashian and Kris Humphries during the week of their $10 million wedding on August 20. The couple split after 72 days. Average number of people who watch a show on their DVR during prime time—larger than the audience for same-day viewing of every network except CBS. Sitcoms (including 2 Broke Girls, above) currently among Nielsen’s Top 20 prime- time shows, which is on track to be the most since the 2002–2003 season.Average number of TV sets in an American home, an all-time high. But the percentage of U.S. households that own a set—about 97 percent—is the lowest since 1975 (one reason may be younger viewers who watch their favorite shows online). $100millionThe amount Amazon paid CBS for the online streaming rights to 2,000 episodes of past programs,including Star Trek,Frasier and Cheers. Minutes the candidates for the Republi- can presidential nomination have spent debating on national television as of December 15. 1,426 11.5million $ 2516,700 32 MILLION3.01 5 TVG01_p10_InTheNews.indd 10 12/21/11 6:45 PM THE EMMY® WINNING SERIES RETURNS S E A S O N SUN JAN 8 9/8C pbs.org/downton Funding for MASTERPIECE is provided by WAR CHANGES EVERYTHING. “Their talent speaks for itself,” Horowitz and Kitsis (inset) say of the cast WATCH MYSHOW! ADVERTISEMENT Once Upon a Time Having served as exec- utive producers on Lost,Adam Horowitz and Edward Kitsis are experts in alternate worlds,shocking twists and the battle between good and evil. As the creators of ABC’s fairy tale–themed new hit,they found another way to spin those kinds of yarns. It’s working: When seven days of DVR usage are included,Once averages 13.8 million viewers and a 4.8 rating among adults 18–49.In case you haven’t checked it out yet (the show returns Janu- ary 8), Horowitz and Kitsis answered our show runner questionnaire in the hopes that you’ll soon book a trip to Storybrooke.—MS I could sit at home and read a fairy tale. Why should I watch your show instead? Because what we’re attempting to do is not retell fairy tales but tell you the parts of them you never knew—to reinvent them through our own sensibilities and then mash them all up in ways we’ve never seen before and we hope the audience hasn’t imagined. What happens if we don’t watch your show? Then the show ends.And we are sad. Give us an algorithm for your show.We don’t understand math. That’s why we became writers. What’s the best thing anyone has said or written about your show? That it made them happy to watch,that it transported them somewhere enjoyable for an hour. Were they right? We take them at their word.Who are we to judge? ABC promotes your Lostcredits.Which past credit should they avoid touting at all costs? Hot Tonight.It was a public access sketch-comedy show we did in Madison, Wisconsin.We thought we were funny.We write drama now. How are you using your power of TV for good? We are trying to write about the power of hope in a time of uncertainty.Also, we use it to fight crime. What’s an alternate title for your show? A Fistful of Fairy Dust. Show runner battles are all the rage these days.Pick a rival show,any show,to start a fight with.60 Minutes.We’ve watched your show.We’ve timed it.Without commer- cials,you’re only 43 minutes. Let’s scare the network.Tell us an idea that didn’t make it out of the writers’ room.We have a show with fairies,dwarves, talking crickets and dragons—we’re not sure they’re frightened of anything anymore. Let’s say you could do a crossover episode with any TV show in history.Which show, and what would the episode be about? The Charmings.And it would be Snow and Charming confronting Snow and Charming. Fighting to the death over who is really…Snow and Charming. Of your cast members, who would fare best on CelebrityApprentice? Rumpelstiltskin.He drives a hard bargain. Now that you’re a hit,what sort of Hollywood-ish thing will you demand? We don’t think of ourselves as a hit; we’re just glad to have the opportunity to tell more stories. That said, we’ve asked ABC for a dwarf entourage. What would a OnceUponaTime ride at Disneyland look like? You’d hop in Emma’s Yellow Bug,race through Storybrooke and escape the curse right before being depos- ited in Fairy Tale Land.That’s where,of course,your picture would be taken in the Magic Mirror.And you’d have to walk through Mr.Gold’s Pawn Shop in order to buy souve- nirs.Or barter your children for the location of your parking spot,which you’ve long since forgotten because of the dizzying ride. TVG01_p11_IntheNews.indd 11 12/20/11 11:59 PM ® ® 9. Subject of the Twenty- First Amendment 10. Bard’s before 11. Tied the knot 12. Feel blindly 13. Choral piece 14. Walt __ Disney 15. Bony part of a chicken 16. Clad like an “Animal House” reveler 17. Longtime Aretha Franklin label 18. Bryce or Grand 20. Got a glimpse of 30. Syrup source 31. Zero 32. Foxy quality 33. Perrier competitor 36. Anti-fur org. 37. Meat grade 39. __ call 40. Some Art Deco works 84. Heroine of Irish legend 85. Feeling, informally 86. Olive, Castor and Cole of “Thimble Theatre” 87. Coup d’__ 88. Antiperspirant brand 89. Bloodmobile visitor 91. Prospector’s strike 92. Put into law 93. El __ (legendary city of gold) 95. Declare untrue 97. State one’s view 98. Morales of “La Bamba” 99. Born, in bridal bios 100. Gog and __ 104. Prods gently 105. Young eels 106. Anti-Saloon __ 110. Layered like a wedding cake 113. Apparatus for making 96-Across 114. New staffer 115. Seemingly forever 117. Playful mammal 118. Toil away 120. Carps constantly 122. Do as directed 123. Mideast bigwig 124. Tear to the ground 127. 100 lb. 128. “Well __-di-dah!” 131. Six-Day War gun 132. Reagan advisor Nofziger 107. Dancer with seven veils 109. Reprimand 41. ’40s computer 44. Unaffiliated in D.C. 45. “Beg pardon ...” 47. __ podrida 48. One of the Baldwins 49. Put a stopwatch to 51. Start the pot 52. Sniff out 54. Thin nail 56. Refusing to listen 57. Metronome setting 59. North-of-the-border gridiron org. 62. Mother of Don Juan 63. Really ticked off 65. __ Hashanah 67. Wall St. debut 70. Help in a heist 71. Practice in the ring 72. Three sheets to the __ 73. Mr. T’s TV group 74. Interest fig. 77. Blissful spots 78. Tamblyn of “West Side Story” 79. Make a getaway 80. Haifa’s land: Abbr. 83. Big Apple tennis stadium ACROSS 1. Hung onto 5. Bermuda hrs. 8. Home __ 12. Term for government agents coined by “Machine Gun” Kelly 16. XXX center 19. Old U.S. gas brand 20. Suffix with luncheon or sermon 21. “A __ formality!” 22. Part to play 23. “... man __ mouse?” 24. __ beer 25. Sam & Dave’s longtime label 26. Pundit’s page 27. Ear-related 28. Bathtub __ 29. Anti-alcohol movement 32. Prohibition nightspot 34. “Say it __, Joe!” 35. Java programs 38. Presidential turndown 39. Surrenderer at Appomattox 42. __ XING (road sign) 43. Flooring manufacturer 45. Quinn of “Benny & Joon” 46. __ Rothstein, a bootlegger who reputedly fixed the 1919 World Series 48. “This must weigh __!” 50. Rocker Turner 52. Doo-woppers __ Na Na 53. Subway entrance 54. __ pig 55. The Eighteenth __ established Prohibition 58. Bluish green hue 59. Oreo filling 60. Think highly of 61. Grafton’s “__ for Evidence” 64. Nickname for Capone 66. Circus horn honker 67. Mae West's “__ Angel” 68. __ Fashioned cocktail 69. Prohibition-era “new breed" of woman 71. Baseball card deals 75. Black-market stuff during Prohibition 76. Starter or reliever 79. “For shame!” 81. Work without __ (be daring) 82. Twosome 85. __ Act 90. Nutrition abbr. 91. Apartment dweller 93. Handy homeowner, slangily 94. Walked upon 96. Prohibition-era whiskey 99. The __ Experiment 100. Seine tributary 104. Temperance movement leader Carry __ 105. Borden spokescow 108. Arlington, Va. is in it 110. Harbor craft 111. Wayne Wheeler, prohibitionist known as the “__ boss” 112. Like excellent pastrami 113. Little guy’s nickname 116. Square-dancing call 119. St. __’s Day Massacre 121. Prohibition-era profiteer 125. Sense of self 101. Law-enforcement orgs. 102. Chunks of history 103. “__ Tu” (1974 hit) 126. Suffix with million 127. Cotton __ 129. Wrapper weight 130. Handle roughly 133. __ runner DOWN 1. Filmmaker Burns 2. Language suffix 3. H.S. Jr.’s exam 4. Ran like the dickens 5. Be present 6. Maze word 7. __ Guinan, Prohibition- era emcee of the 300 Club 8. Coll. V.I.P. 134. Secluded valley 135. Boat’s trail 136. Times to call, in ads 137. Prohibition Unit agent __ Einstein 138. Get the point 139. Downhill conveyance 140. “__ went that-a-way!” 141. Visibly embarrassed 142. Jockey’s handful 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 pbs.org/prohibition/crossword Funding is provided by BANKOFAMERICA; CORPORATIONFORPUBLICBROADCASTING; NATIONALENDOWMENTFORTHEHUMANITIES; THEARTHURVININGDAVISFOUNDATIONS; THEMONTRONEFAMILY through THEPENATESFOUNDATION; and PARKFOUNDATION,INC. STARTS SUN OCT 2 8/7c Custom: Integration Full Page Spread
  • 34. 34 WHY NEWSPAPER? STRENGTHS •  Immediacy, rapid audience accumulations •  Broad market coverage •  Geographic selectivity, regional and/or zip-code targeting •  Wide variety of unit sizes •  Opportunity for detailed copy •  Short lead time LIMITATIONS •  High out-of-pocket •  One day readership •  Cluttered environment •  Limited positioning guarantees •  Limited color opportunities •  Expensive to build continuity •  Inefficient for national advertisers •  Low pass-along rate Newspaper best used: 1. As a “day of” reminder 2. To provide coverage within a local market/neighborhood 3. To communicate offers quickly and capitalize on its “on the day” reach capability
  • 35. 35 NATIONAL LOCAL COLLEGE NEWSPAPER TYPES FREE DAILIES IPAD TYPES DIGITAL Folded
  • 36. 36 NEWSPAPER UNITS VARIOUS UNITS BY SIZE FSI
  • 37. 37 A FEW TERMS CUME: THE AMOUNT OF TIME IT TAKES FOR A PUBLICATION TO ACCUMULATE ITS FULL READERSHIP RATE BASE: THE MINIMUM GUARANTEED NUMBER OF READERS A CERTAIN ISSUE WILL ACHIEVE - WHAT YOU PAY AGAINST CIRCULATION: THE TOTAL NUMBER OF READERS A CERTAIN ISSUE DID ACHIEVE
  • 38. PLANNING + BUYING OOH
  • 39. 39 WHY OOH? STRENGTHS •  Broad reach •  Frequency builder •  Locations can be strategically targeted •  Serve as a reminder medium, supporting other vehicles LIMITATIONS •  Copy limitations •  Passive media •  Expensive out-of-pocket production costs •  Potential high media costs •  Requires longer lead time with regards to securing inventory and creative schedules Out-of-Home best used: 1. To support specific geographic areas 2. To provide additional frequency to the media plan 3. To infiltrate niche locations
  • 40. 40 OOH TYPES Billboards Street Furniture Transit Alternative Standardized large format advertising displays intended for viewing from extended distances, generally more than 50 feet Advertising displays, many that provide a public amenity, positioned in close proximity to pedestrians and shoppers for eye-level viewing or at curbside Advertising displays affixed to moving vehicles or positioned in the common areas of transit stations, terminals, and airports New products are constantly being developed Bulletins Bus Shelters Buses Arenas & Stadiums Digital Bulletins Phone Kiosks Airports Convenience Stores 30-Sheet Posters/Premiere Newsracks Subway & Rail Video Networks 8-Sheet Posters Urban Furniture Truckside Health Clubs Walls/Spectaculars Shopping Malls Taxis Restaurant/Bars Wrapped Vehicles Libraries & Museums Cinema Resorts & Leisure Opportunities 65% of $ 16% of $
  • 41. 41 CLEVER USES
  • 42. 42 ALWAYS LOCAL AGGREGATION CAN MAKE IT FEEL NATIONAL
  • 43. 43 HOWYOU BUY IT Standard OOH contract is for a four- week period Longer is always an option, shorter is NOT always an option LENGTH Almost ALL OOH incurs some sort of production cost: posting, build-out, printing, re-sizing PRODUCTION
  • 44. 44 HOWYOU MEASURE IT DEC Foot/Driving traffic past an ad exposure EYES ON Number of people who actually see the ad MEASURES
  • 45. 45 BUYING PROCESS AGENCY PARTNERS
  • 46. AMPLIFYING VIA DIGITAL EXTENSIONS
  • 47. 47 DIGITAL AMPLIFICATION OF TRADITIONAL Geolocation/ Mobile Websites Search Social RADIO Online Video Interactive TV Search Social TV Augmented Reality Website Social PRINT Screen Interaction NFC / QR Codes #s Social OOH
  • 48. THANK YOU