Children's Entertainment = Flash Games?
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Children's Entertainment = Flash Games?

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Media Cultures assignment.

Media Cultures assignment.
Presentation on Flash games and online MMO's that target children as their audience

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Children's Entertainment = Flash Games? Children's Entertainment = Flash Games? Presentation Transcript

  • A presentation by Adrienne Giuliano
  • “Flash is everywhere. …over 520 million unique installations of Flash have been recorded, accounting for 96%+ of all Internet Users.”
  • Flash Games
    • Flash games/Java games
    • Browser web-related games that essentially run using Flash plugins on a webpage
    • Often free-to-play, played more frequently, and shorter than commercial games
    • Uses vector graphics to achieve great quality images within small file sizes
    • Have placed the power to produce games and game art straight into the hands of the public
  • Art Style???
    • In general, Flash games have varying art styles, though most feature either and/or:
    • Simple or cartoon-like graphics
    • Bright colours/flat colours
    • Uncomplicated environments
    • There are many Flash games emulating old ’80’s classics, such as Tetris 
    • Pac-Man, Frogger, etc etc etc.
    • As these are simple games with likewise simple graphical styles, hence easy to duplicate
    • In many ways, the visual styles of flash games are similar to those of children’s TV shows. Many such games aimed at audiences ranging from 6 – 16 already exist with an alarming number targeted at the youngest of that range.
  •  
    • Club Penguin is an MMORPG aimed at an audience of children aged 6 – 14
    • It was officially launched in 2005, and by 2007 had
    • 700,000 PAID members and 12,000,000 users
    • The site offers the capability for children to chat to one another online.
    • To regulate language use, it features “Safe Chat” and “Ultimate Safe Chat” modes, only the latter where commands can be picked from a menu, in order to prevent swearing and revealing personal information.
    • Users using profane language will face an automatic 24-hour ban.
  • Similarly
    • Habbo Hotel is yet another targeted at a young audience
    • It began in 2000
    • 18 million avatars were been registered as of 2008 with the 100,000,000 th being created in the same year
    • There are an average 8 million unique visitors monthly
    • 75,000 avatars are being created every day
  •  
  • So what’s the difference?
  • From this…
  • … to this?
    • There is growing concern that continuous exposure to the internet is doing more than making them target to internet predators…
    • Cheating and virtual theft are becoming major issues in the virtual world.
    • The issue of cheating has been raised in Club Penguin and members found doing such within or out of the game face a permanent ban…apparently.
  • As a fact…
    • A Dutch teenager has been arrested for allegedly stealing virtual furniture from "rooms" in Habbo Hotel, accused of stealing 4,000 euros (£2,840) worth of virtual furniture, bought with real money.
    • 2005 a Chinese gamer was stabbed to death in a row over a sword in a game. Shanghai gamer Qiu Chengwei killed player Zhu Caoyuan when he discovered he had sold a "dragon sabre" he had been loaned.
    • “ It’s certainly the safest way for unsupervised children to talk to potentially malevolent strangers”
    • The age old concern of child predators is not only enveloping the teenage age group, but now even under 10’s as well.
  • Conclusion
  • sources
    • http://articles.sitepoint.com/article/flash-brief-history
    • http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2007/07/babes-in-the-woods/5974/4/
    • http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi0703080167mar08,0,7203137.story
    • http://www.washingtonpost.com/wpdyn/content/article/2007/08/02/AR2007080202351.html
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Habbo
    • http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7094764.stm
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flash_Games
    • http://articles.sitepoint.com/article/flash-brief-history/2
    • http://news.bbgsite.com/content/2009-10-19/20091019192543954.shtml
    • http://www.virtualworldsnews.com/2008/09/virtual-great-1.html
    • http://www.big-boards.com/int.php?n=60
    • http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19741740/ns/health-kids_and_parenting/
    • http://interactive.dubitlimited.com/research