Psychological horror pp

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Psychological horror pp

  1. 1. Psychological Horror
  2. 2. What is a psychological horror? Psychological horror is a subgenre of horror fiction that relies on character's fears, guilt, beliefs, eerie sound effects, relevant music and emotional instability to build tension and further the plot. Psychological horror is different from the type of horror found in "splatter films"' which derive their effects from gore and violence, and from the sub-genre of horror-of- personality, in which the object of horror does not look like a monstrous other, but rather a normal human being, whose horrific identity is often not revealed until well into the work, or even at the very end.
  3. 3. Related Films • Black Swan. • Blair Witch Project. • The Shining. • The Others. • The Silence of the lambs. • The Sixth Sense.
  4. 4. Characteristics Psychological horror tends to be subtle compared to traditional horror and typically contains less physical harm, as it works it usually has something to do with sexual health and relationships with women and men mainly on the factors of mentally affecting the audience rather than the display of graphic imagery seen in the slasher and splatter sub- genres. It typically plays on archetypal shadow characteristics embodied by the threat. It creates discomfort in the viewer by exposing common or universal psychological vulnerabilities and fears, most notably the shadowy parts of the human psyche which most people repress or deny. The menace in horror comes from within. It exposes the evil that hides behind normality, while splatter fiction focuses on bizarre, alien evil to which the average viewer cannot easily relate.
  5. 5. The Shining Stanley Kubrick’s adaption of Stephen King’s classic novel is in many ways the archetypal psychological horror movie. Jack Nicholson is mesmerising as writer-turned-hotel caretaker Jack Torrance and his slow descent into madness is a deeply unsettling theme throughout the movie. The tension slowly mounts as the movie progresses, climaxing in the famous “Here’s Johnny!” scene that has been copied and parodied over and over again. Despite the presence of supernatural phenomena ranging from an Indian burial ground to ghosts, it’s ultimately Nicholson’s Jack who is the real menace in The Shining.

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