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Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats
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Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats

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Young Canadians in a Wired World – Phase III: Findings from Canada’s largest research project on children and teens’ Internet use are now available. Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, …

Young Canadians in a Wired World – Phase III: Findings from Canada’s largest research project on children and teens’ Internet use are now available. Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats looks at youths’ experiences with online conflict, the strategies they use to deal with this and who they turn to for support.

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  • 1. Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats March 2014 Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts
  • 2. Mean or Cruel Behaviour Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts He said She said: Mean or Cruel Behaviour
  • 3. Mean or Cruel Behaviour Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts In 2013, MediaSmarts conducted a national survey of 5,436 Canadian students, grades 4 through 11, in every province and territory, to explore the role of networked technologies in their lives. Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats is the third in a series of reports which draw on the rich data that was collected. What is the prevalence and impact of online conflict on Canadian youth?
  • 4. Mean or Cruel Behaviour Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Types of Mean or Cruel Behaviours If you answered Yes, what did you do? Percentage Yes Called someone a name 78% Spread rumours 20% Posted or shared an embarrassing photo or video of someone else 16% Harassed someone sexually (said or did something sexual when the person did not want you to) (Gr 7-11 only) 4% Made fun of someone’s race, religion or ethnicity 12% Made fun of someone’s sexual orientation 7% Harassed someone in an online game 26% Other 20%
  • 5. Mean or Cruel Behaviour Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Mean or Cruel Behaviours: Gender
  • 6. Mean or Cruel Behaviour Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Reasons for Being Mean or Cruel Online If you answered Yes, why did you do it? Percentage Yes I was just joking around 55% The person said something mean and cruel about me first 48% The person said something mean and cruel about my friend first 32% I wanted to get even with the person for another reason 22% My friends were doing it 8% I was bored 15% I was angry 25% I did not like the person 32% Other 12% I don’t know 5%
  • 7. Mean or Cruel Behaviour Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Reasons for Mean or Cruel Behaviours: Gender
  • 8. Mean or Cruel Behaviour Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Problems with Mean or Cruel Online Behaviour If you answered Yes, how often was it a serious problem for you? Percentage Often 9% Sometimes 21% Rarely 56% Never 14% • Younger students and girls are most likely to say this was ‘often’ or ‘sometimes’ a serious problem for them • Students who reported that online meanness was ‘often’ or ‘sometimes’ a serious problem represent 11% of the total sample
  • 9. “You’re Going to Get It” – Threats Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts “You’re Going to Get It” – Threats
  • 10. “You’re Going to Get It” – Threats Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts • 9% of students say that they have threatened someone online 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Grade Yes
  • 11. “You’re Going to Get It” – Threats Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts • 31% of students say that they have been threatened online 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Grade At least once a day At least once a week At least once a month At least once a year Less than once a year Never
  • 12. “You’re Going to Get It” – Threats Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts • Boys and older students are more likely to make threats • However, most threats are rare occurrences Has anyone ever threatened you online (for example, said things like “I’m going to get you” or “You’re going to get it”)? Percentage At least once a day 2% At least once a week 2% At least once a month 5% At least once a year 8% Less than once a year 13% Never 69%
  • 13. “You’re Going to Get It” – Threats Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Problems with Threatening Behaviour If you answered ‘At least once a day’, ‘At least once a week’ or ‘At least once a month’, did you think it was a serious problem for you? Percentage Often 12% Sometimes 19% Rarely 27% Never 43% • Students who often or sometimes report online threats as being a serious problem represent 3% of the total sample • Girls (46%) are twice as likely as boys (21%) to see threats as being more problematic
  • 14. “You’re Going to Get It” – Threats Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Frequency of online threats being a problem: Grade 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Grade O en Some mes Rarely Never • Younger students are less likely to be threatened but most likely to say this is ‘often’ or ‘sometimes’ a serious problem for them
  • 15. Strategies for Dealing with Online Conflict Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Strategies for Dealing with Online Conflict
  • 16. Strategies for Dealing with Online Conflict Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Grades 4-6 Grades 7-11 Ask parent(s) for help (74%) Ignore it and hope it would go away (43%) Ignore it and hope it would go away (40%) Talk face to face with the person who posted it (39%) Ask another trusted adult (40%) Ask friends for help (39%) Ask a teacher for help (28%) Ask parents for help (36%) Talk face to face with the person who posted it (26%) It would not bother me so I would do nothing (35%) Ask friends for help (25%) Privately email or message the person who posted it (29%) Most common strategies for dealing with online meanness and cruelty
  • 17. Strategies for Dealing with Online Conflict Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Grades 4-6 Grades 7-11 Ask parent(s) for help (75%) Ask parent(s) for help (43%) Ask another trusted adult (40%) Ask friends for help (42%) Ask friends for help (38%) It would not bother me so I would do nothing (34%) Ask a teacher for help (32%) Ignore it and hope it would go away (34%) Ignore it and hope it would go away (32%) Talk face to face with the person who posted it (28%) Call the police (26%) Ask a teacher for help (23%) Most common strategies for dealing with online threats
  • 18. Strategies for Dealing with Online Conflict Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Parents matter: • Even in Grade 11 many students will turn to their parents for help with online meanness (19%) and threats (26%) • Half of students would tell their parents if someone sent them something that made them really uncomfortable • 72% agree with the statement “If I have a problem online (for example, someone posts something hurtful or sends me a photo that makes me uncomfortable) I can trust my parent(s) to help me solve it.”
  • 19. Strategies for Dealing with Online Conflict Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Most Common Responses to Mean or Cruel Behaviour Boys: • Ask parents for help (39%) • Ignore and hope it will go away (37%) • Do nothing because it doesn’t bother them (36%) • Talk face to face with the poster (33%) • Ask friends for help (26%) Girls: • Ask parents for help (59%) • Ask friends for help (48%) • Ignore and hope it will go away (46%) • Talk face to face with the poster (36%) • Ask another trusted adult (30%)
  • 20. Strategies for Dealing with Online Conflict Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Most Common Responses to Being Threatened Online Girls: • Ask parents for help (67%) • Ask friends for help (50%) • Ignore and hope it will go away (36%) • Ask another trusted adult (33%) • Ask teachers for help or call police (24% for both responses) Boys: • Ask parents for help (42%) • Do nothing because it doesn’t bother them (36%) • Ignore and hope it will go away (30%) • Ask friends for help (29%) • Talk face to face with the poster (26%)
  • 21. Strategies for Dealing with Online Conflict Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts First, Second and Third Most Common Responses to Mean or Cruel Behaviour First responses: 1. Ask parents for help (22%) 2. Ignore the problem and hope it will go away (22%) 3. Do nothing because it doesn’t bother you (20%) 4. Talk face to face with the poster (11%) Second responses: 1. Ask parents for help (17%) 2. Ask friends for help (17%) 3. Ignore the problem and hope it will go away (14%) 4. Talk face to face with the poster (14%) Third responses: 1. Ask parents for help (16%) 2. Ask friends for help (13%) 3. Talk face to face with the poster (13%) 4. Call the police (12%)
  • 22. Strategies for Dealing with Online Conflict Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts First, Second and Third Most Common Responses to Being Threatened Online First responses: 1. Ask parents for help (27%) 2. Do nothing because it doesn’t bother you (21%) 3. Ignore the problem and hope it will go away (18%) 4. Ask friends for help (11%) Second responses: 1. Ask parents for help (19%) 2. Ask friends for help (18%) 3. Ignore the problem and hope it will go away (13%) 4. Talk face to face with the poster (9%) Third responses: 1. Call the police (21%) 2. Ask parents for help (14%) 3. Ask friends for help (11%) 4. Talk face to face with the poster (9%)
  • 23. Bystanders and Interveners Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Bystanders and Interveners: Helping Others in Conflict
  • 24. Bystanders and Interveners Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Percentage Yes Overall 65% Students who have been recipients of mean/cruel comments or threats 78% Students who have not been recipients of mean/cruel comments or threats 52% Students who have made mean/cruel comments or threats 75% Students who have not made mean/cruel comments or threats 61% Helping Someone Who is Being Picked on Online
  • 25. Bystanders and Interveners Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Helping someone being picked on online: Gender
  • 26. Bystanders and Interveners Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Helping someone being picked on online: Grade 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Grade Yes
  • 27. Bystanders and Interveners Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Rules and Attitudes about Cyberbullying in School and at Home
  • 28. Rules and Attitudes Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts • 47% of students have household rules about treating others with respect online • Having this rule correlates with lower levels of mean/cruel and threatening behaviour: – Students with no household rules about treating others with respect are 59% more likely to be mean or cruel than students who have this rule and are twice as likely to make threats
  • 29. Rules and Attitudes Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts When it comes to schools, the picture is more complicated… • Although most students (62%) report their schools have rules or policies to deal with cyberbullying, there is little correlation between having school rules and whether or not a student has engaged in, or been a recipient of, mean, cruel or threatening online behaviour.
  • 30. Rules and Attitudes Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Relationship between being recipient of mean/cruel behaviour or threats and school rules
  • 31. Rules and Attitudes Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts If your school has rules or policies, do you think they are helpful? Percentage Often 36% Sometimes 40% Rarely 17% Never 6% Helpfulness of school rules and policies regarding cyberbullying
  • 32. Rules and Attitudes Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Helpfulness of School Rules and Policies: Grade
  • 33. Rules and Attitudes Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Helpfulness of School Rules and Policies: Students who have been recipients of Mean/Cruel or Threatening Online Behaviour
  • 34. Rules and Attitudes Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Helpfulness of School Rules and Policies: Students who have engaged in Mean/Cruel or Threatening Behaviours
  • 35. Rules and Attitudes Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Learning About Cyberbullying From my parent(s) From teachers From friends From reading about it online I have never learned about this I have learned about how to deal with cyberbullying 43% 62% 15% 13% 14% Students are most likely to learn about cyberbullying from teachers, but not as likely to go to them for help. • Out of parents, friends, other trusted adults, teachers and police, teachers come second-last for help with meanness and cruelty and last for help with being threatened.
  • 36. Rules and Attitudes Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Would You Like to Learn More About Cyberbullying in School?
  • 37. Rules and Attitudes Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Do you agree or disagree with the following statements? School Culture Agree Percentage Overall Has been recipient of mean/cruel or threatening behaviour Has NOT been recipient of mean/cruel or threatening behaviour Has engaged in mean/cruel or threatening behaviour Has NOT engaged in mean/cruel or threatening behaviour I feel respected and valued as a member of my school community 81% 76% 86% 73% 84% Bullies are usually popular at school 42% 49% 36% 49% 40%
  • 38. Rules and Attitudes Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Cyberbullying: Dealing with Online Meanness, Cruelty and Threats © 2014 MediaSmarts Do you agree or disagree with the following statements? Agree Percentage Overall Has been recipient of mean/cruel or threatening behaviour Has NOT been recipient of mean/cruel or threatening behaviour Has engaged in mean/cruel or threatening behaviour Has NOT engaged in mean/cruel or threatening behaviour Sometimes parent(s) or teachers call it bullying when kids are really just joking around. 76% 80% 71% 82% 83%