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Human rights equity and MeTA - where is the link

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  • Title of presentation 17-24 Feb 2008 MeTA CSO Capacity Building workshop
  • Transcript

    • 1. Human Rights, Equity and MeTA: Where is the Link? Mulumba, Moses 26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    • 2. Objectives of the Session
      • To understand the link between rights, equity and MeTA work;
      • To examine how inequity in health affects access to essential medicines;
      • Share experiences
      26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    • 3. What is Equity in Health?
      • ‘ Equity in health implies that ideally everyone should have a fair opportunity to attain their full health potential and, more pragmatically, that no-one should be disadvantaged from achieving this potential, if it can be avoided’
      26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    • 4. Equity in Health Con’t
      • ‘ Access to health care is equitable if and only if there are no information barriers, financial barriers, or supply anomalies that prevent access to a reasonable or decent basic minimum of health care services’
      26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    • 5. Equity in Health Con’t
      • ‘ Equity means equal opportunity of use of health services for equal need’
      26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    • 6. What Does Equity in Health Require?
      • Equity in health implies addressing differences in health status that are unnecessary, avoidable and unfair.
      • In Africa, these typically relate to disparities across:
      • Racial groups,
      • Rural/urban status,
      • Socio-economic status,
      • Gender,
      • Age; and
      • Geographical region.
      26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    • 7. What Equity Requires?
      • Equity in Health calls for interventions that seek to allocate resources preferentially to those with the worst health status;
      • Achieving greater equity in health should be understood as a measure of health progress
      • While major gains have been made in reducing mortality and morbidity and in reducing inequalities in health and access to health care, many preventable inequalities in health persist.
      26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    • 8. What does equity mean for MeTA?
      • Equity issues in access to medicines arise at several levels:
        • i) International level, including trade-related and intellectual property issues, corporate social responsibility, supply and procurement issues;
        • National supply chains and health systems (public, NGO, formal and informal, private); and
        • individual/household and community levels
      26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    • 9. So What?
      • There is need to understand how MeTA can focus its energies at international and national levels to promote more equitable access to medicines at household and community level.
      26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    • 10. Does this mean a thing for us??
      • This means understanding the barriers that poor and socially excluded people face in accessing medicines, and how these relate to supply chains, markets and public procurement.
      26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    • 11. What then is the challenge?
      • A specific challenge is to ensure that MeTA’s transparency and accountability focus, and multi-stakeholder approach, offers benefits to poor people, in terms of both access and inclusion.
      26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    • 12. More Specific Issues
      • What can we learn and adapt from broader work on poverty and other barriers to access to medicines?
      • How can increased transparency and accountability in markets, supply chains and procurement contribute to achieving equitable access?
      • How does limited transparency and accountability undermine poor and socially excluded people’s access to medicines?
      26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    • 13. Specific Issues Con’t
      • How and at what points in the medicines chain and on what issues would greater transparency make a difference?
      • Within MeTA’s scope, what complementary data and actions are needed to promote poor and socially excluded people’s access to medicines?
      • What are the key knowledge gaps in relation to equitable access to medicines, and how can they be filled?
      26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    • 14. What CSOs Should Know?
      • CSOs should understand and influence the redistribution of social and economic resources for equity oriented interventions.
      • CSOs should also understand and inform the power and ability people (and social groups) have to make choices over health inputs and their capacity to use these choices towards health.
      26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    • 15. Thank you! 26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building

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