Human rights equity and MeTA - where is the link

696 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
696
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Title of presentation 17-24 Feb 2008 MeTA CSO Capacity Building workshop
  • Human rights equity and MeTA - where is the link

    1. 1. Human Rights, Equity and MeTA: Where is the Link? Mulumba, Moses 26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    2. 2. Objectives of the Session <ul><li>To understand the link between rights, equity and MeTA work; </li></ul><ul><li>To examine how inequity in health affects access to essential medicines; </li></ul><ul><li>Share experiences </li></ul>26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    3. 3. What is Equity in Health? <ul><li>‘ Equity in health implies that ideally everyone should have a fair opportunity to attain their full health potential and, more pragmatically, that no-one should be disadvantaged from achieving this potential, if it can be avoided’ </li></ul>26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    4. 4. Equity in Health Con’t <ul><li>‘ Access to health care is equitable if and only if there are no information barriers, financial barriers, or supply anomalies that prevent access to a reasonable or decent basic minimum of health care services’ </li></ul>26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    5. 5. Equity in Health Con’t <ul><li>‘ Equity means equal opportunity of use of health services for equal need’ </li></ul>26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    6. 6. What Does Equity in Health Require? <ul><li>Equity in health implies addressing differences in health status that are unnecessary, avoidable and unfair. </li></ul><ul><li>In Africa, these typically relate to disparities across: </li></ul><ul><li>Racial groups, </li></ul><ul><li>Rural/urban status, </li></ul><ul><li>Socio-economic status, </li></ul><ul><li>Gender, </li></ul><ul><li>Age; and </li></ul><ul><li>Geographical region. </li></ul>26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    7. 7. What Equity Requires? <ul><li>Equity in Health calls for interventions that seek to allocate resources preferentially to those with the worst health status; </li></ul><ul><li>Achieving greater equity in health should be understood as a measure of health progress </li></ul><ul><li>While major gains have been made in reducing mortality and morbidity and in reducing inequalities in health and access to health care, many preventable inequalities in health persist. </li></ul>26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    8. 8. What does equity mean for MeTA? <ul><li>Equity issues in access to medicines arise at several levels: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>i) International level, including trade-related and intellectual property issues, corporate social responsibility, supply and procurement issues; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>National supply chains and health systems (public, NGO, formal and informal, private); and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>individual/household and community levels </li></ul></ul>26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    9. 9. So What? <ul><li>There is need to understand how MeTA can focus its energies at international and national levels to promote more equitable access to medicines at household and community level. </li></ul>26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    10. 10. Does this mean a thing for us?? <ul><li>This means understanding the barriers that poor and socially excluded people face in accessing medicines, and how these relate to supply chains, markets and public procurement. </li></ul>26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    11. 11. What then is the challenge? <ul><li>A specific challenge is to ensure that MeTA’s transparency and accountability focus, and multi-stakeholder approach, offers benefits to poor people, in terms of both access and inclusion. </li></ul>26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    12. 12. More Specific Issues <ul><li>What can we learn and adapt from broader work on poverty and other barriers to access to medicines? </li></ul><ul><li>How can increased transparency and accountability in markets, supply chains and procurement contribute to achieving equitable access? </li></ul><ul><li>How does limited transparency and accountability undermine poor and socially excluded people’s access to medicines? </li></ul>26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    13. 13. Specific Issues Con’t <ul><li>How and at what points in the medicines chain and on what issues would greater transparency make a difference? </li></ul><ul><li>Within MeTA’s scope, what complementary data and actions are needed to promote poor and socially excluded people’s access to medicines? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the key knowledge gaps in relation to equitable access to medicines, and how can they be filled? </li></ul>26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    14. 14. What CSOs Should Know? <ul><li>CSOs should understand and influence the redistribution of social and economic resources for equity oriented interventions. </li></ul><ul><li>CSOs should also understand and inform the power and ability people (and social groups) have to make choices over health inputs and their capacity to use these choices towards health. </li></ul>26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building
    15. 15. Thank you! 26-30 April 2009 MeTA CSO Capacity Building

    ×