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Concept and structure of MeTA

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Presentation on Concept and structure of MeTA by Wilbert Bannenberg, MeTA Technical Director during the MeTA Country Sharing Meeting, London, 8 December 2009.

Presentation on Concept and structure of MeTA by Wilbert Bannenberg, MeTA Technical Director during the MeTA Country Sharing Meeting, London, 8 December 2009.

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  • MeTA @ ZLC 4/12/2009 www.medicinestransparency.org
  • MeTA @ ZLC 4/12/2009 www.medicinestransparency.org
  • Title of presentation 15/01/10 MeTA
  • Title of presentation 15/01/10 MeTA
  • Title of presentation 15/01/10 MeTA
  • Title of presentation 15/01/10 MeTA
  • Title of presentation 15/01/10 MeTA
  • MeTA @ ZLC 4/12/2009 www.medicinestransparency.org
  • 4/12/2009 www.medicinestransparency.org MeTA @ ZLC
  • Transcript

    • 1. Wilbert Bannenberg Technical Director Concept and Structure of MeTA 21/7/2009
    • 2. XXX
    • 3. What is MeTA?
      • A global alliance between:
        • DFID, World Bank, WHO, private sector, civil society, professional organisations.
      • Multi-stakeholder collaboration
        • Government, CSOs and Private Sector
      • Working in 7 pilot countries to improve access to medicines.
      • An International Secretariat to support country work, and, upon request, technical assistance.
      4/12/2009 MeTA
    • 4. MeTA hypothesis?
      • Cooperation and commitment by the 3 main stakeholder groups to disclose and jointly analyse data around the medicines supply chain will lead to better access to essential medicines
      4/12/2009 MeTA
    • 5. Transparency?
      • Improving information access, scrutiny and use, in order to support the development of viable, efficient medicines markets and supply systems that benefit all developing country consumers
        • Transparency = not only disclosure of the price, quality, use, availability of medicines; but also:
        • how to use the information to identify barriers, and to agree on solutions
      23/06/2009 MeTA
    • 6. Key data collected in MeTA
      • [Mainly through disclosures by stakeholders]
      • Price data of medicines
        • Procurement prices (~ MSH Intl price indicator)
        • Retail prices private, public sector (~WHO/HAI methodology)
        • Components (tax, VAT, margins, profit etc)
      • Quality and registration status
        • Medicines, GMP plants, GDP wholesalers, Licensed outlets
      • Availability (basket)
      • Promotion (being developed)
      23/06/2009 MeTA
      • … for each area:
      • Policy
      • Practices
      • Outcomes?
    • 7. Contextual information collected
      • [From surveys rather than from disclosures]
      • Supply chain operations
        • Supply chain mapping data
      • Affordability
        • Generic utilization data, cost of treatment (related to salary)
      • Equitable access
        • Data on health and medicines expenditure by income group, and experiences of treating key illnesses by income group.
      • Rational use
        • Household survey data, prescribing data in health facilities
      23/06/2009 MeTA
    • 8. Who should disclose what?
      • Government : VAT, taxes, budget, selection, quantification,
      • Procurement agency : purchase & selling prices
      • DRA : quality and registration data, inspection, QC lab results
      • Private sector : prices, margins, availability, promotion codes of conduct
      • Civil society / academics : Availability (equity), Affordability, Rational use
      23/06/2009 MeTA
    • 9. What should this lead to?
      • Better information to the sector & general public
      • More engagement in MeTA Councils
      • All stakeholders better informed
      • More trust and collaboration between stakeholders
      • Seeking improved, joint solutions
      • Better access to medicines
        • Key hypothesis to be proven!
      23/06/2009 MeTA
    • 10. 1. Responsibility for access
      • Governments are responsible for providing access to health care, including access to essential medicines
      05/09/2009 3 MeTA FIP
    • 11. 2. Role of transparency
      • Stronger and more transparent systems and improved supply chain management will increase access
      05/09/2009 3 MeTA FIP
    • 12. 3. Equity
      • Increasing equitable access to medicines improves health and enables other human development objectives to be achieved
      05/09/2009 4 MeTA FIP
    • 13. 4. Evidence-based policy
      • Improved information about medicines can inform public debate, and provide a basis for better policy
      05/09/2009 6 MeTA FIP 2. Affordable prices ACCESS 1. Rational selection 4. Reliable health and supply systems 3. Sustainable financing
    • 14. 5. Mutual accountability through mutli-stakeholder action
      • A multi-stakeholder approach that involves all sectors – private, public and civil society - will lead to greater accountability
      05/09/2009 7 MeTA FIP
    • 15. XXXX 21/7/2009
    • 16. MeTA Structure
      • Pilot Country National Stakeholder Forums, each with a Secretariat,
      • The International Secretariat
      • A Management Board (consisting of UK's DFID , which chairs the Board, the World Health Organization and the World Bank )
      • An International Advisory Group
      • DFID, WHO, WB, Private Sector, Academia, Pilot Country reps
      • .
    • 17. MeTA Core Principles
      • Governments are responsible for providing access to health care, including access to essential medicines
      • Stronger and more transparent systems and improved supply chain management will increase access
      • increasing equitable access to medicines improves health and enables other human development objectives to be achieved
      • Improved information about medicines can inform public debate, and provide a basis for better policy
      • A multi-stakeholder approach that involves all sectors – private, public and civil society - will lead to greater accountability
    • 18. MeTA’s goal
      • MeTA’s overall goal is to increase access to essential medicines for the poorest of the poor in developing countries
    • 19. XX
    • 20. MeTA hypothesis?
      • Cooperation and commitment by the 3 main stakeholder groups to disclose and jointly analyse data around the medicines supply chain will lead to better access to essential medicines
      4/12/2009 MeTA
    • 21. The MeTA Pilot Disclosure of data and scrutiny by multi - stakeholder group Development of policy options Policy change and implementation Improved information for management Improved processes . New validated data on pharmaceutical sector New validated data on pharmaceutical sector Disclosure of data and scrutiny by multi - stakeholder group Development of policy options Policy change and implementation Changes in drug prices, availability, quality and/or promotion Changes in drug prices, availability, quality and/or promotion Improved information for management Improved processes . Pilot New validated data on pharmaceutical sector Changes in drug prices, availability, quality and/or promotion ££, toolkit & technical support Policy research, shared learning Sector plans, domestic and CPs

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