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Why business brands need big ideas. - McCann Enterprise

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  • 1. WHY BUSINESS BRANDS NEED BIG IDEASBREAKFAST FORWARD13TH JUNE 2013
  • 2. Who we are
  • 3. ConsultingSponsorshipsSales promotionPresence marketingEventmarketingRetail marketingEntertainment PRExperientialMarketingCorporate identityBrand architectureInterior designIndustrial designNamingPackage designBrand valuationBrandConsultingCustomer strategyDigital and directmarketing solutionsWebsite design andtechnologyAnalytics andmeasurementDatabasemanagementLead managementDigitalMarketingGlobal practicesin all sectorsInvestor relationsPublic affairsCorporatecommunicationsNew-mediaservicesPublicRelationsMedia planningand buyingMedia researchand insightsMeasurement andoptimisationDigital strategyconsultingAnalytics andeconomic modelingMedia Planning& Buying ServicesFMG brand strategyConsumer insightsand trendsAdvertisingGlobal and regionalcampaignmanagementMarketingconsultancyConsumerCommunicationsEnterprise BranddevelopmentBehavioural trans-formationInternal brandactivationIntegrated brandcommunicationAdvertising,, ContactMarketing and CRMEnterpriseCommunications
  • 4. How we think
  • 5. WATCHYOUR THOUGHTS,FOR THEY BECOME WORDS.WATCHYOUR WORDS,FOR THEY BECOME ACTIONS.
WATCHYOURACTIONS,FOR THEY BECOME HABITS.
WATCHYOURHABITS,FOR THEY BECOME CHARACTER.
WATCHYOUR CHARACTER,FOR IT BECOMESYOUR DESTINY
  • 6. Most sales professionals view90% of sales materials createdby marketers as valueless.‘CMO Council Survey’ 2009
  • 7. Marketers view most sales-createdcontent as diluting their brands orinaccurately positioning their products.‘CMO Council Survey’ 2009
  • 8. We believe that an organisation whose people are emotionally connectedand behaviourally aligned has a competitive advantage
  • 9. In other words people’s beliefs andbehaviours create competitive advantageWe call businesses that realise thisadvantage Enterprise Brands…
  • 10. Enterprise Brands need dynamic ideasIdeas that engage people – inside and outIdeas that create a dynamic value generating partnershipsIdeas that are capable of energising the enterpriseIdeas that create direction and synergy
  • 11. We call these ‘Energising Ideas’
  • 12. “It’s a lot more funbeing David thanGoliath”RICHARD BRANSON
  • 13. “Mr. President, I’m helping to put a man on the moon.”Source: NASA Janitor
  • 14. The journey towards your ideaENERGISINGIDEAHow is the brandcurrently understood?How does theenterprise see itself?How do people feelabout it?What does the brandlook like?DiscoveryWhat does the brandaspire to be?What do people reallywant for themselves?Who do we admire?What is the art of thepossible?(Vision, Mission,Values,Position)Brand EssenceExplorationHow do we manifestour ideas?• Visual identity• Internalbehaviours• Advertising• On-Line• PR• Services• Assets• EtcExpressionHow do peoplerespond?How do we optimise?How do we measure?What do we architectthe idea?RefinementDefinition
  • 15. The most powerfulideas come fromwithin yourbusiness
  • 16. Defining the brandVision (to be)Mission (to do)Position (to compare)Values (to behave)Essence (to distil)Expresses the organisation’s ambition or aspiration foritself, all its people, its customers and key stakeholdersDetermines what benefits the company wants to bring to itscustomers in terms of adding value to their businessPositions the enterprise onthe competitive map andshows how it is superiorand uniqueThe organisation’sbehavioural guidelines, fromsenior management to areceptionistSummarising all of theelements of the brandpyramid into a singleminded thoughtor the ‘DNA’ of theorganisation
  • 17. Energising Ideas act as a springboard
  • 18. Driving a truly integrated creative culture
  • 19. Brand ideas in action
  • 20.  The heart of the challenge was a need to force a reappraisalof Deloitte’s expertise – shifting perceptions away fromaccountancy to a more comprehensive suite of consultancyservices To do this, we needed to showcase the phenomenal breadthand depth of Deloitte’s involvement and demonstrate howdeeply its work was etched into the fabric of the gamesThe challenge to address
  • 21. Our guiding principles Firstly, that we continually challenged our audience’sperceptions of Deloitte’s competencies – highlighting theunexpected and forcing people to view Deloitte in a freshlight And secondly, that we found the right ‘sweet spot’ betweenthe emotions of the Games and the corporate world of‘consulting’ and– while doing justice to to Deloitte’s skills andwithout dumbing down or simplifying the truth
  • 22. Energising IdeaTHE BRAINS BEHINDTHE GAMES
  • 23. How do we bring this idea to life?
  • 24. “ That’s what successful brands of today areall about. Creating, telling and inspiringstories that make us enjoy things more. ”
  • 25. Our ‘Deloitte stories’ We chose not need to draw on the usual conceit and artifice ofadvertising Instead, we focused on what Deloitte’s people were doing every minute,every day and every week to help deliver London 2012 was the – realtruth, well told. We decided to tell stories about Deloitte’s contributions to the Games;to build the campaign gradually through a series of authentic narratives,each positioning Deloitte as integral to the Games, but each with a focusand intrigue of its own It was about uncovering their stories, and turning them into interestingand insightful pieces of communications
  • 26. We interviewed thepeople in the know –the Deloittesecondees
  • 27. Rational andinformative– allowingthose interested in theGames to beintroduced to Deloitteand the work they havebeen doing backstage.Educational andanticipatory.EducationBringing the Games tolife. Mirroring thefeelings of anticipationand the moments ofemotion andexhilaration that theGames will deliver withDeloitte’s involvementCelebrationReflecting with prideupon the success of theGames and Deloitte’scrucial contribution,but also introducingthe legacy that it yet tocomeLegacyMarch 2012- July 2012July 2012 – August2012September 2012 –November 2012
  • 28. “WE DELIVER SUCH A HUGE CHURCH OFSERVICES…IFYOU’RE AN AUDITINGCLIENT OFTHE FIRM,THIS CAMPAIGNHELPS SHOWTHERE’S SO MUCH MORETOWHAT DELOITTE OFFERS”Sally Ormiston,Director Programme Management
  • 29. Results: Internal activation In December 2011, only 37% of employees said they could talk at aninformed level about Deloitte’s London 2012 story. Just three weeksafter the campaign launched, this had reached 63% 3,200 employees have visited the external website since the campaignlaunch, versus 887 in the same period prior In the first 5 weeks after the internal launch, over 60% of employeesvisited the campaign homepage on the firm’s intranet
  • 30. Results: External activation Out of over 30 sponsor campaigns live on the official London 2012 site, thiscampaign ranked in the top ten in terms of total number of click thrus Between January and May 2012, over 150 pieces of PR coverage in national,newswire, broadcast, trade and online media were generated By the time Deloitte House closed on October 16th, over 15,000 clients hadpassed through and seen the campaign Visitors to the website increased from 14,236 to 16,080 in the three monthsafter the campaign launch “I didn’t know Deloitte was involved in the Games, let alone delivering the 750,000hours mentioned in your ad” – Chief Executive, speaking at theTimes CEOSummit
  • 31. The brand challengeGlobal non-woven fibres business created through acquisition A need to rationalise the business A need to combat competitive pressures A need to drive stock market valueA need to harness people behind an ambitious strategy for growth…
  • 32. A siloed structure and culture
  • 33. Engaging the global organisationA combination of interviews and brand workshops connecting with over 100employees over 7 global territories
  • 34. Customers saw them as interchangeable(Source: McCann Interviews)“Fiberweb are thecompany I go towhen I want a goodsolid reliable product”“Fiberweb areOne of the top 5suppliers, but thereis no number one”
  • 35. “A dependable partner meeting the needsof customers, day after day” McCann Interviews
  • 36. What was missing?A brand idea to define, connectand galvanise the business…… creating purpose and ambition for the business… and competitive distinction for customers
  • 37. “We are wise and knowledgeable partners; always proactive and comingup with new solutions to our customers challenges – and quickly. We areambitious to succeed by helping our customers with better products andbetter ways of doing things. Our culture has a real can-do attitude.”RICHMONDWORKSHOP
  • 38. Internal brand and archetype workshop insightsTwo strands of thought dominated feedback The on-going commercial imperative of delivering to customers The recognition that competitive distinction lies in innovative solutions A tension between today and tomorrow People managing what they can at least control today – customer service But an understanding that tomorrow’s dynamic requires more – innovation
  • 39. So how did theyresolve the tension?
  • 40. ‘Sage’ nearly always preferredto ‘Creator’ or ‘Explorer’…SAGE CREATOR EXPLORER
  • 41. So why the ‘Sage’? ‘Sage’ is an attempt to resolve thetension of service and innovation It is an aspirational interpretationof being responsive to customers Uses knowledge and expertise asthe traction between the two skills But requires the dynamism andromanticism of ‘Creator’ and‘Explorer’...
  • 42.  Sage’ an assertion of Fiberweb’s role in providing greater value to theircustomers, providing them with the benefits of their unique knowledgeand expertise ‘Creator’ and ‘Explorer’ emotionalise the brand archetype andemphasise the importance of innovation in maintaining competitiveadvantage
  • 43. Three key themes/pillars were identifiedApplicationexpertiseTechnicalleadershipChangingcustomers’world
  • 44. DEFINING THE FIBERWEBENTERPRISE BRAND DIAMOND
  • 45. VisionTO EXCEL IN THE INTELLIGENT APPLICATIONOF MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY
  • 46. MissionWE WORKWITH CUSTOMERSTO REVEALAND REALISETHE POTENTIAL OF MATERIALSTECHNOLOGYTOTHEIR BUSINESS
  • 47. PositionAPPLICATION LEADERSHIP – unmatched experienceand expertise that allows us to design and craft uniquesolutions to the demands of both manufacturer and end userTECHNOLOGICAL RELEVANCE – unmatched technicalexpertise and commitment to world-class R&D that allows usto drive next generation solutions that our customers needCUSTOMER INTIMACY – unmatched relationships withcustomers built on delivery, support and an intimateunderstanding of their business
  • 48. ValuesTEAMWORK – We believe in working together to produce thebest results, whether working with our customers to identify their needs orworking with each other to find innovative solutions that solve these needs.CREATIVITY – We believe the obvious answer is not always thebest answer. It is only by applying lateral and original thinking to what wedo that we are able to deliver the best answers for our customers.AGILITY – We believe in agility of the body and of the mind – theability to work fast and flexibly without stifling process getting in the way, butalso thinking quickly on our feet to generate new and inspiring possibilities.COMMITMENT – We believe in having the courage of ourconvictions and in having the tenacity to stay the course – seeing our ideasthrough to the end and delivering what we promise despite the hurdles andchallenges that may stand in our way.
  • 49. The Fiberweb Enterprise BrandTO EXCEL INTHE INTELLIGENT APPLICATIONOF MATERIALSTECHNOLOGYWEWORKWITH CUSTOMERSTO REALISETHE GREATER POTENTIAL OF MATERIALSTECHNOLOGY APPLIEDTO THEIR BUSINESSAPPLICATIONLEADERSHIPTECHNOLOGICALRELEVANCECUSTOMER INTIMACYTEAMWORKCREATIVITYAGILITYCOMMITMENTMATERIALSINTELLIGENCEAPPLIEDVisionMissionPositionValuesEssence
  • 50. THE NEXTANSWERWhether a challenge for today orone for the future, we’ve got thequick-thinking team to respondand inspire.At Fiberweb it’s with intelligentfiber solutions that we willcontinue to help build your brand,maximise profitability and keepyou competitive.So whatever your next question,talk to Fiberweb for the nextanswer.
  • 51. Identity development
  • 52. Internal communications
  • 53. Employee brand book
  • 54. Intranet
  • 55. Product communications
  • 56. Website
  • 57. A simplified organisational architectureEnterprise BrandIndustry SectorProduct BrandProduct Name
  • 58. Product brand identity alignment

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