Oral HealthGetting Ready   1. Review lesson plan before each session.   2. Copy handouts and follow-up questions:         ...
ScriptIntroductionToday we will discuss the importance of taking care of your teeth and gums. Taking care ofyour teeth and...
well. Your satisfaction with dentures depends largely on the ability of the remaining ridges inyour mouth to provide the n...
Denture careWearing dentures does not mean that good oral care can be ignored. If you wear dentures, theyshould be removed...
Primary author: Nikki Hawthorne MS, RD, LD                                       NOAHnet@uga.edu                        Pr...
Oral Health                  Are you past due for a dental check-up?                   Symptom                            ...
County:Date:Name:                                               Age:                          Ask yourself each day…Do I:P...
May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602   8      Funding from UGA, the No...
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  1. 1. Oral HealthGetting Ready 1. Review lesson plan before each session. 2. Copy handouts and follow-up questions: a. Oral Health b. Questions 3. Gather supplies needed for lesson and activities.Supplies Needed 1. Toothbrush, toothpaste, dental floss and water. 2. Handouts.Beginning the Lesson 1. Introduce yourself by name and the organization you represent. 2. Summarize the lesson by giving the objectives. Let the group know the lesson ill be informal and they can ask questions anytime.Objectives – The participants will: 1. Learn dental concerns of older adults. 2. Learn how to improve and maintain good oral hygiene. 3. Learn proper denture care. 4. Understand how to choose foods for good oral health. May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 1 Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
  2. 2. ScriptIntroductionToday we will discuss the importance of taking care of your teeth and gums. Taking care ofyour teeth and gums is very important to the health and well being of older adults. Many dentalproblems could be stopped or improved through simple care and regular visits to your dentist.Changes in teeth and supporting tissueTissues in your mouth, like other body tissues, change as you grow older. Soft tissues like gumsand cheeks lose their ability to stretch and muscles become soft and weak. The amount of salivaproduced by glands in your mouth is less. As a result, chewing becomes more difficult, and yourmouth becomes more easily irritated and heals more slowly than when you were younger.DecayThe rate of tooth decay may increase as you grow older. This is especially true when the amountof saliva is lower. Tooth decay in older adults often appears around the teeth near the gums.Saliva is a key component of plaque formation. Without saliva, food can stick to the teeth moreeasily, which contributes to plaque formation. When plaque becomes harder it is called calculus.The root portion of a tooth, when exposed, is easy to decay. Gumline or root decay is difficult torepair with fillings.Periodontal diseaseYou may have periodontal disease if your gums are swollen or if they bleed easily. Pocketsoften develop between teeth and gums and can pack or trap food debris. This disease is generallyfound in many older adults. If not treated, the disease becomes worse. In the elderly, periodontaldisease is a primary cause for loss of teeth.Brittleness and wear of teethNerve tissue and blood vessels are found in teeth. When you were young, these nerves were veryresponsive to pain or anything hot or cold. Your brittle teeth may be easily broken or chipped.However, due to the reduced nerve tissue, little if any pain is experienced when even severefractures occur.Teeth wear because of the grinding action of chewing. Tooth enamel becomes thinner. In severecases, the hard enamel covering is completely worn away leaving a softer part of the tooth(dentin) exposed. Eating foods that are high in starch, such as sugars, honey or candy, candissolve dentin. This can leave you with teeth with only a fragile enamel shell. These teeth areeasily chipped or broken.Tolerance to denturesIf you wear a complete or partial removable denture you want it to be comfortable and work May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 2 Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
  3. 3. well. Your satisfaction with dentures depends largely on the ability of the remaining ridges inyour mouth to provide the necessary support. After teeth are removed, the remaining bone(ridge) continues to shrink to a smaller size. The gum tissue covering the ridge becomes thinnerand is more easily irritated. The rigid, non-changing dentures do not fit as well. As a result,chewing hurts and can become difficult. This happens with nearly half of the dentures worn byelderly persons, and can change the types of healthy foods you might normally eat. Other factorscan cause additional dental problems include:Oral cancersOral cancer risk can increase with age. About three percent of all cancers are found in the jaws,lips, tongue and palate (roof of the mouth). The effect of oral cancers and their treatment can beawful. Surgical treatment often results in loss of a portion or all of the jaws, tongue or palate.Radiation (x-ray) therapy used to treat some oral cancers generally results in a lower amount ofsaliva. This means that your mouth may be sore and your teeth may decay more easily. All ofthese problems can stop you from eating normal, healthy foods.Drug therapyTreatment of some diseases (heart disease, high blood pressure, depression, Parkinsonsdisease) may require the use of many medications. This may lower your saliva, which results in avery dry mouth and the problems we have discussed. What can we do to stop these problems,especially when you still have to keep taking your medications?Improving dental hygieneGood oral hygiene is perhaps the simplest and most efficient way to promote comfort and helpreduce the dental problems associated with aging.Brushing: A medium soft brush and dental paste is recommended. For those incapable ofgripping the handle, a rubber strap can be fastened to fit snugly around the hand. The brush maybe easier to hold and control if a larger handle is made. Teeth, gums and tongue should bebrushed at least once a day.Flossing: Flossing removes materials from areas difficult to reach with a toothbrush — betweenthe teeth and at the gum line. Flossing takes practice and is difficult if you have limitations inarm and finger movements. Ask your dentist about flossing tools to help you with this problem.Rinsing: With a decrease in saliva, food particles adhere more readily to the teeth and gums.Rinsing with warm water will dislodge the particles. This is especially important if you havedifficulty brushing. Rinsing, however, should not be considered a substitute for brushing.Mouthwash is helpful but irritating to gums because of their high alcohol content. Dilute themouthwash with water. May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 3 Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
  4. 4. Denture careWearing dentures does not mean that good oral care can be ignored. If you wear dentures, theyshould be removed after eating and rinsed with warm water. The mouth should also be rinsedwell. Dentures also accumulate calculus like the teeth they replaced. Do you remember whatcalculus is? (Get a response) Scrub your dentures with a stiff brush and cream to remove thesedeposits. Liquid denture cleaning solutions do not clean dentures all the way. Do-it-yourselfdenture liners should be avoided. They become rough and irritating and collect bacteria and fooddebris. Liners are also difficult to keep clean. For more information on any of the dental aids orcleaning procedures, consult your dentist. Dentists can help you make a routine to provide thebest means of cleaning your teeth and gums.Eat a balanced diet for good oral healthEating a variety of foods can help your teeth stay healthy. Foods that supply protein, vitamin Aand vitamin C help to keep gums healthy. Foods with a lot of calcium and vitamin D such ascheese and milk are needed for strong teeth. Limiting sugary drinks and foods like cola, snackcakes, doughnuts, and candy may help decrease cavities.Referenceshttp://www.ada.org/consumer/perio.htmlhttp://www.aoa.dhhs.gov/aoa/pages/agepages/teethmou.htmlhttp://muextension.missouri.edu/xplor/againg/gg0005.htmThe Food Stamp Program provides nutrition assistance to people with low income. It can helpbuy nutritious foods for a better diet. To find out more, contact your local food stamp office,food bank, or senior center. May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 4 Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
  5. 5. Primary author: Nikki Hawthorne MS, RD, LD NOAHnet@uga.edu Primary reviewer: Marilyn O. Wright, MS, RD, LDThis material, including artwork, was developed with support from the Department of Foods andNutrition at The University of Georgia, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and theUSDA Food Stamp Nutrition Education Program. Permission is granted to reproduce, translate,abstract, review or quote these materials in whole or in part for educational purposes only (notfor profit beyond the cost of reproduction) provided that the author(s) and The University ofGeorgia receive acknowledgement as shown in this example notice: Reprinted with permissionfrom The University of Georgia, Department of Foods and Nutrition, Athens, GA. Authors, Title,Date. May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 5 Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
  6. 6. Oral Health Are you past due for a dental check-up? Symptom Check Point  Value Dry Mouth 2 Eating Difficulty 1 No Recent Dental 1 Care (Within 2 years) Tooth or mouth pain 2 Alteration or change 1 in food selection Sores or Lumps in 2 the mouth Total Score = Total Score: if you scored more than 2 points, you may have aHealth problem that could Oral dental affect your health. See your dentist!May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 6 Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
  7. 7. County:Date:Name: Age: Ask yourself each day…Do I:Please circle your answers1. Brush my teeth?No Yes2. Floss my teeth?No Yes3. Rinse my mouth after eating?No Yes4. Check my mouth for sores?No Yes May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 7 Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer
  8. 8. May 2003, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 8 Funding from UGA, the Northeast Georgia Area Agency on Aging and USDA UGA is an equal opportunity provider and employer

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