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  1. 1. PROGRAMS FOR DENTAL OFFICERS at the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE DENTAL SCHOOL CONTENTSCALENDAR FOR ACADEMIC YEAR 2009-2010INTRODUCTIONRESIDENCY PROGRAMS COMPREHENSIVE DENTISTRY ENDODONTICS ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL PATHOLOGY PERIODONTICS PROSTHODONTICSFELLOWSHIP IN MAXILLOFACIAL PROSTHETICSFELLOWSHIP IN OROFACIAL PAINCOURSE DESCRIPTIONSCONTINUING DENTAL EDUCATION PROGRAMCORRESPONDENCE COURSE PROGRAMVIDEO SERIESADMINISTRATIVE STAFFNAVAL POSTGRADUATE DENTAL SCHOOL FACULTYADJUNCT CLINICAL FACULTYVISITING FACULTY, CONSULTANTS, AND VISITING LECTURERS
  2. 2. CALENDAR FOR ACADEMIC YEAR 2009-2010 2009 First Year Residents Report Wednesday, 24 June Labor Day Monday, 7 September Columbus Day Monday, 12 October Veterans Day Holiday Wednesday 11 November Thanksgiving Leave Period Thursday-Friday, 26-27 November Christmas Leave Begins Friday, 18 December, 1600 hrs 2010 Classes Resume Monday, 4 January Martin Luther King’s Birthday Monday, 18 January Presidents’ Day Monday, 15 February Spring Leave Begins Friday, 26 March, 1600 hrs Classes Resume Monday, 5 April Memorial Day Holiday Monday, 31 May Graduation Friday, 4 JuneNo classes will be held on the holidays listed.Additional copies of this and other Naval Postgraduate Dental School catalogs can be obtained bywriting to the Dean, Naval Postgraduate Dental School, Navy Medicine Manpower, Personnel,Training and Education Command (Code NPDS), 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, Maryland20889-5602. NPDS-CAT-O38Version 2009 June Back to Contents
  3. 3. Back to ContentsINTRODUCTIONThe Naval Dental School opened on February 3, 1923, as the Dental Department of the UnitedStates Naval Medical School, Washington, D.C. Its twofold purpose was the postgraduateinstruction of officers of the Dental Corps of the US Navy and the training of hospital corpsmen toserve as dental assistants. In 1942, the newly designated National Naval Medical Center, includingthe Naval Dental School, was established in Bethesda, Maryland. The dental school wasredesignated the Naval Graduate Dental School in 1971 and the National Naval Dental Center in1975. In 1983, the Naval Dental Clinic, Bethesda, was established, with the Naval Dental School asa component facility. In 1989, the Naval Dental Clinic was renamed the National Naval DentalCenter. In 1999, the Naval Dental School was renamed the Naval Postgraduate Dental School(NPDS). In 2004, the National Naval Dental Center was disestablished. Under the command andsupport of the Navy Medical Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education Command, the NavalPostgraduate Dental School conducts advanced programs for dental officers that are designed tohelp the Dental Corps meet its need for officers who are fully qualified to practice, teach, andconduct research in dentistry. The programs are as follows:- Two-year residencies in comprehensive dentistry, endodontics- Two-year fellowship in orofacial pain- Three-year residencies in oral and maxillofacial pathology, periodontics, and prosthodontics- One-year fellowship in maxillofacial prosthetics- One-year advanced education in general dentistryAdmission to Residency ProgramsAll residents at the Naval Postgraduate Dental School are selected by the Dental Corps Full-TimeDuty Under Instruction Selection (DUINS) Board, which meets annually in June. To be eligible fora residency, Dental Corps officers must have completed their initial tour of duty and cannot be in afailure of selection promotion status.Dental officers should apply, via their commanding officer, to the Commanding Officer, NavyMedical Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education Command (Code OGDC), 8901 WisconsinAvenue, Bethesda, Maryland 20889-5411. Each applicant should submit a statement of motivationconcerning background, interests, and reasons for requesting a residency, consistent with theapplicant’s abilities and career plan. A maximum of three letters of evaluation, preferably at leastone from a specialist in the applicant’s area of interest, must be submitted. Applicants must alsorequest that transcripts from predental, dental, and other significant education be forwarded to theabove address. All required information must be received no later than 1 May of the year precedingthe year the residency would commence. Full information on how to apply, including the specifiedformat, is given in the current BUMEDNOTE 1520. Additional information concerning admissionto various programs may be found in the Manual of the Medical Department, chapter 6, sectionXVI. Information also may be obtained from the Navy Medicine Manpower, Personnel, Trainingand Education Command (Code OGDC) at DSN 295-0650 or commercial (301) 295-0650.Continuing Education ProgramsInformation on continuing dental education courses and correspondence courses is given in thiscatalog under “Continuing Dental Education Program” and “Correspondence Course Program.”Residency Programs
  4. 4. The Naval Postgraduate Dental School (NPDS) offers a 1-year fellowship in maxillofacialprosthetics, 1-year program in advanced education in general dentistry, 2-year fellowship inorofacial pain; 2-year residencies in endodontics; comprehensive dentistry; and 3-year residencies inperiodontics, prosthodontics, and oral and maxillofacial pathology. Dental officers in 2-yearprograms and those continuing in a third-year-level program can expect to remain at the NavalPostgraduate Dental School through the completion of their residencies. (To meet the requirementsof the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, residencies in oral and maxillofacialsurgery are conducted at naval hospitals.)The programs in advanced education in general dentistry, comprehensive dentistry, endodontics,oral and maxillofacial pathology, periodontics, maxillofacial prosthetics, and prosthodontics are ac-credited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation. The Commission is a specialized accreditingbody recognized by the Commission on Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation and by theUnited States Department of Education. The Commission on Dental Accreditation can be contactedat (312) 440-2718 or at 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611. The Commission on DentalAccreditation will review complaints that relate to a programs compliance with the accreditationstandards. The Commission is interested in the sustained quality and continued improvement of den-tal and dental-related education programs but does not intervene on behalf of individuals or act as acourt of appeal for individuals in matters of admission, appointment, promotion or dismissal of fac-ulty, staff or students. A copy of the appropriate accreditation standards and/or the Commissionspolicy and procedure for submission of complaints may be obtained by contacting the Commissionat 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago IL 60611 or by calling 1-800-621-8099 extension 4653.All formal dental residencies sponsored by the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Navy Department,Washington, DC, meet the educational requirements for examination by specialty certifying boards.The curricula for the residency programs at the Naval Postgraduate Dental School are listed and de-scribed in this catalog. Back to ContentsThe George Washington University Master of Science Degree ProgramResidents receive a Master of Science degree in health sciences (track in oral biology) from theSchool of Medicine and Health Sciences, The George Washington University.Goals of the Naval Postgraduate Dental School- Develop clinically proficient specialists for the Federal services- Prepare, support, and have all residents achieve board certification- Prepare dental officers to successfully manage specialty or advanced general dentistry practices in the military environment- Prepare residents to be academic and clinical mentors to members of the Dental Corps and den- tal profession- Promote a life-long interest in continued professional development, clinical, education and re- search endeavors.- Conduct health care research projects and contribute to the professional literature- Prepare residents to critically review pertinent scientific literature- Prepare residents for leadership rolesResearchAll residents are required to conduct a research project following NPDS guidelines. At theconclusion of the residency, each resident will present an oral report of this project and submit amanuscript suitable for publication.
  5. 5. Back to ContentsOther Educational ResourcesThe Naval Postgraduate Dental School arranges with other military and civilian institutions for jointseminars and interschool teaching opportunities. Principal interinstitutional relationships are withthe Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Navy Medicine Manpower, Personnel,Training and Education Command, the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, the ArmedForces Institute of Pathology, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the National Institutes of Health,Howard University, the University of Maryland, and The National Institute of Standards andTechnology. Dental specialists from many scientific and educational institutions are appointed asconsultants at the school. Some of these specialists participate in the residency and continuingeducation programs.Course DesignationsAll courses have been assigned Naval Postgraduate Dental School numbers according to the year ofstudy in which they are usually taken: NPDS 200-series, first-year residency level; NPDS 300-series, second-year residency level; and NPDS 400-series, third-year residency level.Core CoursesA common core curriculum has been developed to ensure a well-rounded educational experience.The following are core courses: Applied Dental Psychology Advanced Oral Diagnosis Dental Administrative Management Ethics Forensic Dentistry Management of Medical Emergencies Naval Operational Management Pharmacotherapeutics Systemic Disease in Clinical Dentistry Research MethodologyOther Background InformationThose who complete residencies at the Naval Postgraduate Dental School ultimately are expected toattain Board certification in their specialty or discipline. A clinical camera and a personal computerare indispensable for capturing and organizing the large volume of information and documentationthat will be accumulated during the residency and will be needed for subsequent Board preparation.Because documentation of clinical cases begins early, residents should learn to use a clinical camerabefore commencing the program. Similarly, a working knowledge of the personal computer forstoring, updating, and retrieving journal articles and abstracts, as well as for writing and revisingreports, is essential.It is highly recommended that residents own a clinical camera and become fully acquainted with itsuse. Although there are computers in the school, access may be limited. Most residents elect topurchase their own computer to ensure unimpeded access. This practice is strongly encouraged. Thecomputers at the school are IBM compatible and highly effective. Any camera or computer thatmeets all the requirements of a resident is acceptable. Back to Contents
  6. 6. RESIDENCY PROGRAM IN COMPREHENSIVE DENTISTRYDirector: Captain Evan ApplequistThe Naval Postgraduate Dental School has been offering postgraduate courses in general dentistrysince 1923. These courses have evolved into a 2-year residency program in comprehensive dentistry.This ADA-accredited program is designed primarily for dental officers with 1 to 8 years of clinicalexperience who desire to learn comprehensive treatment planning for complex cases, develop a highdegree of proficiency in all aspects of dental practice, and prepare themselves to become futureteachers and mentors. The curriculum also includes courses to educate dental officers in contingencyroles, military leadership, and personnel management. During the second year, the graduate isexpected to challenge the written portion of the American Board of General Dentistry and, ifsuccessful, the oral and treatment planning section the following year.FIRST-YEAR PROGRAMThe program unites basic and dental sciences in a formal schedule. Courses in the biologicalsciences are designed to update the dental officer’s knowledge in these areas, and the student is thenexpected to correlate the subject matter with clinical practice. The program provides time for study,research, and clinical practice. During the year, the dental officer is required to engage in a researchproject. First-Year CurriculumCourse Contact HoursNPDS 227 Advanced Oral Diagnosis 10NPDS 249 Anxiolysis 7NPDS 201 Applied Dental Psychology 8NPDS 252 Complete Dentures 37NPDS 223 Dental Implantology 22NPDS 208 Endodontics 42NPDS 253 Fixed Prosthodontics 33NPDS 288 General Dentistry Sick Call Rotation 32NPDS 281 Forensic Dentistry 14NPDS 262 Informal Treatment Planning Seminar 8NPDS 218 Management of Medical Emergencies 2NPDS 344 Maxillofacial Prosthetics (hours 24-26) 3NPDS 204 Microbiology 18NPDS 221 Naval Operational Management 14NPDS 224 Occlusion 24NPDS 225 Operative Dentistry 39NPDS 236 Oral Pathology 34NPDS 239 Oral Surgery 14NPDS 285 Orofacial Pain 32NPDS 240 Orthodontics 17NPDS 222 Pediatric Dentistry 16NPDS 241 Periodontics 42NPDS 228 Pharmacotherapeutics in Clinical Dentistry 17NPDS 259 Removable Partial Dentures 26NPDS 264 Research Methodology I 7
  7. 7. NPDS 365 Seminar, Comprehensive Dentistry 87NPDS 368 Seminar, Comprehensive Dentistry ABGD Board Examination 20NPDS 286 Seminar, Diagnosis and Treatment Planning 12NPDS 279 Seminar, Operative Dentistry 16NPDS 217 Specialty Clinic, Comprehensive Dentistry 988NPDS 231 Systemic Disease in Clinical Dentistry 22NPDS 353 Treatment Rendered Seminar 20NPDS 206 Topographical Anatomy 20Feedback Sessions 7Orientation, GMT, PRT, Integral Parts, etc. 130Total hours 1,840 Back to ContentsSECOND-YEAR PROGRAMThe second-year curriculum complements the first-year program and expands the clinical experienceto 80 percent of contact hours. Board-certified specialists from each Naval Postgraduate DentalSchool (NPDS) clinical department are designated as consultants to augment the comprehensivedentistry staff. Each consultant has assignments in the Comprehensive Dentistry Clinic to observeand mentor residents during patient treatment.The didactic portion of the second-year course consists of regularly scheduled seminars for literaturereview, clinical pathology, and treatment planning. Periodically, special lecturers and outsideconsultants are scheduled. In both the clinical and didactic portions of the course, NPDS staffmembers from each discipline are responsible for articulating the treatment philosophies of theirvarious specialties and coordinating these philosophies with the concept of comprehensive dentistry. Second-Year CurriculumCourse Contact HoursHSMP 215 Dentistry and the Law 30HSMP 221 Strategic Management in Dentistry 30NPDS 321 Basic Life Support (Recertification) 4NPDS 371 Dental Administrative Management 12NPDS 311 Ethics 7NPDS 324 General Dentistry Sick Call Rotation 72NPDS 377 Immunology (hours 1,2) 2NPDS 314 Oral Surgery Rotation 36NPDS 323 Orofacial Pain Rotation 9NPDS 315 Pediatric Dentistry Rotation 36NPDS 264 Research Methodology II 8NPDS 355 Research Project 40NPDS 365 Seminar, Comprehensive Dentistry 87NPDS 368 Seminar, Comprehensive Dentistry ABGD Board Examination 37NPDS 367 Seminar, Comprehensive Dentistry ABGD Board Preparation 17NPDS 331 Seminar, Clinical Oral Pathology 20NPDS 317 Seminar, Occlusion 9NPDS 360 Seminar, Oral Medicine 10
  8. 8. NPDS 358 Seminar, Orofacial Pain 6NPDS 312 Seminar, Orthodontics 6NPDS 325 Seminar, Periodontics 6NPDS 359 Seminar, Prosthodontics 10NPDS 318 Special Guest Lecturers/Consultant Visits 32NPDS 319 Specialty Clinic, Comprehensive Dentistry 1183NPDS 320 Teaching, Comprehensive Dentistry 10NPDS 310 Teaching Methods Seminar 5NPDS 353 Treatment Rendered Seminar 20Feedback Session 1GMT, PRT, Integral Parts, etc. 95Total hours 1,840 Back to ContentsRESIDENCY PROGRAM IN ENDODONTICSDirector: Commander Terry WebbThis 2-year program involves study of the morphology, physiology, and pathology of the humandental pulp and periradicular tissues. It encompasses the basic clinical sciences, including biology ofthe normal pulp, and the etiology, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases and injuries ofthe pulp and associated periradicular conditions.Previously, completion of an ADA-accredited endodontic program was required before a Candidatewas qualified to take the Written Examination. A new category, Prospective Board Candi-date, was established to allow students enrolled in an ADA-accredited endodontic program to takethe Written Examination in the year of their graduation.The curriculum also includes military subjects that enable dental officers to undertake contingencyroles and to perfect their skills in military leadership and personnel management.FIRST-YEAR PROGRAMThe first-year program consists of a full calendar year of study. The program provides a formalschedule, with time allotted for research and clinical practice. The courses in the biological sciencesare designed to update the resident’s knowledge in these areas and to correlate this subject matterwith clinical practice. A significant amount of time is spent in literature and clinical seminars onendodontics. In the seminar format, scientific knowledge, the latest research developments, andclinical concepts such as diagnosis, treatment modalities, treatment options, and patient managementare correlated. During the year, the resident devotes attention to developing clinical proficiency andundertakes a research project in the field of endodontics. Back to Contents First-Year CurriculumCourse Contac t Hours
  9. 9. NPDS 227 Advanced Oral Diagnosis 10NPDS 249 Anxiolysis 7NPDS 201 Applied Dental Psychology 8NPDS 202 Biochemistry 12NPDS 223 Dental Implants (Hours 8-13) 6NPDS 281 Forensic Dentistry 14NPDS 203 Immunology 18NPDS 209 Laboratory, Endodontic Technique 66NPDS 210 Laboratory, Pulp Morphology 20NPDS 207 Laboratory, Surgical Anatomy 16NPDS 218 Management Medical Emergencies 2NPDS 344 Maxillofacial Prosthetics (Oncology) 3NPDS 204 Microbiology 18NPDS 221 Naval Operational Management 14NPDS 225 Operative Dentistry 39Oral Pathology CE Course 32NPDS 239 Oral Surgery (hours 1,2 and 9-11) 5NPDS 285 Orofacial Pain 32NPDS 222 Pediatric Dentistry (hours 1-4) 4NPDS 241 Periodontics 31NPDS 228 Pharmacotherapeutics in Clinical Dentistry 17NPDS 263 Research 170NPDS 264 Research Methodology I 7NPDS 214 Seminar, Classical Endodontics Literature 84NPDS 211 Seminar, Clinical Endodontics/Presurgical Conference 93NPDS 265 Seminar, Current Endodontics Literature 36NPDS 212 Seminar, Endodontics Consultant Series 24NPDS 215 Seminar, Endodontics/Related Specialties 3NPDS 216 Specialty Clinic, Endodontics 886NPDS 231 Systemic Disease in Clinical Dentistry 22NPDS 206 Topographical Anatomy 20Endodontic Program Critiques 6Feedback Sessions 3Orientation, GMT, PRT, etc. 112Total hours 1,840SECOND-YEAR PROGRAMThe second-year program consists of a second full calendar year of study and provides continuedtraining in clinical practice, seminars, teaching, and research. The clinical program includes adiversity of clinical experiences, with emphasis on the treatment of challenging and unusual cases.Applications of recent developments and innovations in clinical endodontics are also emphasized.The program includes rotations through several services of the National Naval Medical Center,Bethesda.In addition to clinical practice, the program at the Naval Postgraduate Dental School placesemphasis on the development of teaching and research capabilities. The resident participates in theteaching program in endodontics and devotes a considerable amount of time to an original researchproject. The resident continues to participate in the literature and clinical seminars on endodontics
  10. 10. and, in addition, participates in clinical oral medicine and oral and maxillofacial pathology seminars.The resident is encouraged to attend short courses, conferences, and lectures on endodontics andrelated subjects. Second-Year CurriculumCourse Contact HoursHSMP 215 Dentistry and the Law 30HSMP 221 Strategic Management in Dentistry 24Basic Dental Implants CE course 32NPDS 321 Basic Life Support (Recertification) 4NPDS 371 Dental Administrative Management 12NPDS 300 Endodontic Biology Review (Integral Parts) 24NPDS 311 Ethics 7NPDS 309 Laboratory, Surgical Anatomy 20NPDS 264 Research Methodology II 8NPDS 355 Research Project 200NPDS 301 Rotation through Naval Hospital, Bethesda 84NPDS 302 Seminar, Clinical Endodontics/Presurgical Conference 93NPDS 307 Seminar, Endodontic Surgical Oral Pathology 10NPDS 364 Seminar, Current Endodontics Literature 36NPDS 306 Seminar, Endodontics Consultant Series 24NPDS 303 Seminar, Endodontics Classical Literature 84NPDS 304 Seminar, Endodontics/Related Specialties 3NPDS 360 Seminar, Oral Medicine 10NPDS 305 Specialty Clinic, Endodontics 1035NPDS 308 Teaching, Endodontics 13NPDS 310 Teaching Methods Seminar 5Endodontic Program Critique 6Feedback Session 1GMT, PRT, etc. 75Total hours 1,840 Back to Contents
  11. 11. RESIDENCY PROGRAM IN ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL PATHOLOGYDirector: Captain James T. CastleOral and Maxillofacial Pathology is the specialty of dentistry and pathology that deals with the na-ture, identification, and management of diseases affecting the oral and maxillofacial regions. It is ascience that investigates the causes, processes and effects of these diseases. The practice of Oral andMaxillofacial Pathology includes research, diagnosis of diseases using clinical, radiographic, micro-scopic, biochemical or other examinations, and management of patients.Training consists of 36 months of didactic, clinical and laboratory coursework with coordinated ro-tations at the Naval Postgraduate Dental School, the Uniformed Services University of the HealthSciences, National Naval Medical Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, State of MarylandMedical Examiner’s Office, and the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology. The program is designedto prepare the resident to practice surgical and clinical Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology within themilitary medical network. The curriculum also includes military subjects that enable dental officersto undertake contingency roles and to perfect their skills in military leadership and personnel man-agement.Emphasis is placed on microscopic and clinical diagnoses as well as the proper management of headand neck disease. A research project in the field of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology is required,with subsequent presentation of the research or a scientific abstract at the annual meeting of theAmerican Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology. An additional project suitable for publica-tion will also be assigned while at the AFIP.Successful completion of this program leads to certification in Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology andeligibility to challenge the board examination administered by the American Board of Oral andMaxillofacial Pathology. It is also expected that the resident will challenge the examination processleading to Fellowship status within the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology.FIRST-YEAR PROGRAMThe first-year of the residency program is conducted at the Naval Postgraduate Dental School(NPDS). It includes training in the biological sciences, particularly as it relates to the morphologicand clinical study of diseases affecting all organ systems of the body with special emphasis on thehead and neck regions. Didactic courses in both oral and general pathology are a major focus of thefirst year along with introduction to surgical microscopy and daily case unknowns. Training in theclinical phases of oral and maxillofacial pathology is obtained through attendance at clinicopatho-logic conferences and otorhinolaryngic tumor boards, along with selected clinical rotations. A tableclinic will be prepared and presented at the Tri-Service dental meeting. Identification of a researchtopic and preparation of the initial abstract is expected during this year. A degree of self-direction inthe program is provided, with the opportunity for the resident to select an emphasis in clinical ororal histopathology through NPDS 250, Independent Study in Special Topics.
  12. 12. First-Year CurriculumCourse Contac t HoursNPDS 234 Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology I 360NPDS 235 Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology II 328NPDS 201 Applied Dental Psychology 8NPDS 227 Advanced Oral Diagnosis 10NPDS 202 Biochemistry 12NPDS 281 Forensic Dentistry 14NPDS 274 General Pathology 174NPDS 203 Immunology 18NPDS 250 Independent Study in Special Topics 209NPDS 290 Intro. to Basic Histopathology Techniques, Special Procedures, and Lab Mgmt 12NPDS 218 Management of Medical Emergencies 2NPDS 344 Maxillofacial Prosthetics (Oncology) 3NPDS 221 Naval Operational Management 14NPDS 284 Oral Medicine/Clinical Oral Diagnosis 20NPDS 236 Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology 34NPDS 222 Pediatric Dentistry (hours 1-4) 4NPDS 228 Pharmacotherapeutics 17NPDS 263 Research 235NPDS 264 Research Methodology I 7NPDS 361 Seminar, Advanced Surgical Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology 30NPDS 289 Seminar, Special Clinical Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Topics 30NPDS 237 Seminar, Special Pathology 30NPDS 231 Systemic Disease in Clinical Dentistry 22Feedback Sessions 3Orientation, GMT, PRT, Holiday periods, etc. 244Total hours 1,840SECOND-YEAR PROGRAMThe second year curriculum is comprised of assigned rotations in general pathology at the NationalNaval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington DCand the State of Maryland Medical Examiner’s office, Baltimore, Maryland. Residents willparticipate in the gross and microscopic examination of surgical specimens, and obtain experience inclinical pathology, hematopathology, cytopathology, and dermatopathology and soft tissuepathology. A minimum rotation of 6 months in surgical pathology is required. The resident will alsoobtain experience with autopsy techniques and will act as a prosector in a minimum of 20 autopsies.The residents will actively participate in the continuing education program offered by the medicalpathology staff and are encouraged to present head and neck seminar cases during their year-longrotation.THIRD-YEAR PROGRAMThe third-year curriculum consists of assignment to the Department of Oral and MaxillofacialPathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Washington, DC. The AFIP acts as aconsultation center for pathologists throughout the world. Therefore, this year of training provides
  13. 13. the opportunity to study the most unusual and interesting disease processes that occur in, but are notlimited to, the head and neck in man. Normally, an opportunity to conduct a retrospective study onone or more of these diseases leading to a scientific publication is provided and highly encouraged.During the third year of study, the resident will help support the continuing education mission of theAFIP, NPDS, and other military commands through seminar presentations. Support for the forensicmission of AFIP and its affiliates (Office of the Armed Forces Medical Examiner) will also beprovided by the OMFP residents during mass disaster operations on an as needed basis. Challengingthe Fellowship examination, which is sanctioned by the Academy of Oral and MaxillofacialPathology, rounds out this final year.The following courses are taken at the Naval Postgraduate Dental School in the third year:Course Contact HoursHSMP 215 Dentistry and the Law 30HSMP 221 Strategic Management in Dentistry 30NPDS 371 Dental Administrative Management 12NPDS 311 Ethics 8NPDS 264 Research Methodology II 8NPDS 310 Teaching Methods Seminar 5 Back to ContentsRESIDENCY PROGRAM IN PERIODONTICSDirector: Commander Ivan RomanThe residency program in periodontics provides 36 months of formal training leading to boardcertification in periodontics within the guidelines established by the Commission on DentalAccreditation. Upon completion of the residency program, the recently trained periodontist will be aclinician familiar with and competent in theoretical and practical knowledge and technical skillspertinent to the specialty. Successful completion of the program enables the resident to participate inthe written examination of the American Board of Periodontology within 4 months after graduation.The resident is eligible to participate in the oral examination within one year of completion of theprogram leading to certification by the American Board of Periodontology. The curriculum alsoincludes military subjects that enable dental officers to undertake contingency roles and to perfecttheir skills in military leadership and personnel management.FIRST-YEAR PROGRAMThe first-year program provides a biologic rationale for practice, emphasizing basic scienceprinciples, medical and paramedical subjects, and related dental sciences. The resident gains clinicalexperience in select phases of periodontics, presents oral patient case reports, and documents andpresents patient cases each year following the requirements and format as set forth by the AmericanBoard of Periodontology.A research project is required to be designed and conducted by the resident and, at the conclusion ofthe residency, the resident will present an oral report and prepare a manuscript suitable for
  14. 14. publication. Seminars are an integral part of the program, and each resident is given acomprehensive bibliography of the periodontal literature for abstraction and discussion. Residentswill also participate in selected meetings, seminars, and clinical conferences. First-Year CurriculumCourse Contact HoursNPDS 227 Advanced Oral Diagnosis 10NPDS 372 Advanced Osseointegration 18NPDS 249 Anxiolysis 7NPDS 201 Applied Dental Psychology 8NPDS 202 Biochemistry 12NPDS 223 Dental Implantology 22NPDS 208 Endodontics (hours 12, 16, 25-28) 7NPDS 281 Forensic Dentistry 14NPDS 203 Immunology 18NPDS 270 Grand Rounds 25NPDS 242 Mineralized Tissue Biology 8NPDS 218 Management of Medical Emergencies 2NPDS 344 Maxillofacial Prosthetics (Cleft palate and oncology) (hours 14, 15, 24-26) 5NPDS 204 Microbiology 18NPDS 200 Moderate Sedation and Analgesia 35NPDS 221 Naval Operational Management 14NPDS 224 Occlusion 21NPDS 236 Oral Pathology 34NPDS 239 Oral Surgery 14NPDS 285 Orofacial Pain 32NPDS 240 Orthodontics 17NPDS 222 Pediatric Dentistry (hours 1-4) 4NPDS 241 Periodontics 31NPDS 228 Pharmacotherapeutics in Clinical Dentistry 17NPDS 263 Research 290NPDS 264 Research Methodology I 7NPDS 238 Seminar, Board Case Presentation 30NPDS 243 Seminar, Current Periodontics Literature 30NPDS 277 Seminar, Current Periodontal Topics 60NPDS 247 Seminar, Orthodontics 4NPDS 213 Seminar, Pediatric Dentistry 3NPDS 245 Seminar, Periodontics Literature 114NPDS 246 Seminar, Periodontics/Prosthodontics 13NPDS 248 Specialty Clinic, Periodontics 705NPDS 268 Surgical Anatomy Seminar and Laboratory 12NPDS 231 Systemic Disease in Clinical Dentistry 22NPDS 206 Topographical Anatomy 20Feedback Sessions 7Orientation, GMT, PRT, etc. 130Total hours 1840
  15. 15. SECOND-YEAR PROGRAMThe second-year program emphasizes the clinical practice of periodontics, encompassing the varietyof problems that may be encountered in a clinical periodontal practice. Additional experience inperiodontal histopathology, clinical oral and maxillofacial pathology, case presentation, practiceteaching, and the clinical medical sciences will provide further basis for clinical practice.Additionally, the practical and didactic basis for intravenous sedation is studied. The program willbe devoted to a 3-month rotation in the Anesthesia Department of the Naval Hospital and associatedmedical rotations to support training to competency in intravenous conscious sedation Second-Year CurriculumCourse Contact HoursHSMP 215 Dentistry and the Law 30HSMP 221 Strategic Management in Dentistry 30NPDS 372 Advanced Osseointegration 18NPDS 412 Anesthesia Rotation 480NPDS 321 Basic Life Support (Recertification) 4NPDS 270 Grand Rounds 25NPDS 242 Mineralized Tissue Biology 8NPDS 200 Moderate Sedation and Analgesia 35NPDS 355 Research 290NPDS 335 Seminar, Board Case Presentation (Periodontics) 30NPDS 331 Seminar, Clinical Oral Pathology 20NPDS 336 Seminar, Current Periodontics Literature 30NPDS 334 Seminar, Current Periodontal Topics 60NPDS 333 Seminar, Orthodontics 4NPDS 213 Seminar, Pediatric Dentistry 3NPDS 338 Seminar, Periodontics Literature 114NPDS 339 Seminar, Periodontics/Prosthodontics 13NPDS 332 Seminar, Surgical Oral Pathology 10NPDS 340 Specialty Clinic, Periodontics 509NPDS 268 Surgical Anatomy Seminar and Laboratory 12NPDS 341 Teaching, Periodontics 12NPDS 310 Teaching Methods Seminar 5Feedback Session 3GMT, PRT, etc. 95Total hours 1,840 Back to ContentsTHIRD-YEAR PROGRAMRotations at periodontic departments in branch clinics and specialty clinics in a hospital setting,specifically plastic surgery and ENT, will be completed. Additionally, more intensive clinicalexposures to the diagnosis, treatment planning, and the management of the complex dental implantcase will occur. Third-Year CurriculumCourse Contac t
  16. 16. HoursHSMP 215 Dentistry and the Law 30HSMP 221 Strategic Management in Dentistry 30NPDS 372 Advanced Osseointegration 18NPDS 371 Dental Administrative Management 12NPDS 311 Ethics 7NPDS 270 Grand Rounds 25NPDS 242 Mineralized Tissue Biology 8NPDS 200 Moderate Sedation and Analgesia 35NPDS 264 Research Methodology II 8NPDS 355 Research Project 290NPDS 335 Seminar, Board Case Presentation (Periodontics) 30NPDS 336 Seminar, Current Periodontics Literature 30NPDS 413 Seminar, Current Periodontal Topics 60NPDS 333 Seminar, Orthodontics 4NPDS 213 Seminar, Pediatric Dentistry 3NPDS 338 Seminar, Periodontics Literature 114NPDS 339 Seminar, Periodontics/Prosthodontics 13NPDS 332 Seminar, Surgical Oral Pathology 10NPDS 340 Specialty Clinic, Periodontics 994NPDS 268 Surgical Anatomy Seminar and Laboratory 12NPDS 341 Teaching, Periodontics 12GMT, PRT, etc. 95Total hours 1,840 Back to ContentsRESIDENCY PROGRAM IN PROSTHODONTICSDirector: Captain Curtis M. WerkingAdvanced training in prosthodontics consists of 3 years of formal study in an integrated program.The 3 years of training fulfill the requirements for examination and certification by the AmericanBoard of Prosthodontics. Those candidates in prosthodontics who wish to pursue the specialty ofmaxillofacial prosthetics may apply for a fourth year (fellowship) of formal training.The curriculum also includes military subjects that enable dental officers to undertake contingencyroles and to improve their skills in military leadership and personnel management.FIRST-YEAR PROGRAMIn the first-year program, residents are introduced to the specialty of prosthodontics, its scope, andhistory. They receive in-depth instruction in the laboratory and clinical aspects of complete dentures,removable partial dentures, fixed partial dentures, maxillofacial prosthetics, implant prosthodontics,and geriatric prosthodontics. Residents are required to know and use the materials and techniquesused in patient restoration and perform all phases of laboratory work related to their clinical cases.Residents participate in literature and treatment planning seminars on specific topics inprosthodontics and on the relationship of prosthodontics to other specialties of dentistry. Eachresident must conduct a research study in the field of prosthodontics. All cases are assigned during
  17. 17. the first year. First-Year CurriculumCourse Contact HoursNPDS 260 Advanced Complete Dentures 60NPDS 261 Advanced Fixed Prosthodontics 133NPDS 227 Advanced Oral Diagnosis 10NPDS 271 Advanced Removable Partial Dentures 23NPDS 372 Advanced Osseointegration 18NPDS 249 Anxiolysis (optional) 7NPDS 201 Applied Dental Psychology 8NPDS 251 Clinic and Laboratory Assignments, Prosthodontics 798NPDS 252 Complete Dentures 38NPDS 223 Dental Implantology 22NPDS 363 Dental Implantology, Patient Presentations 9NPDS 208 Endodontics (Hrs. 12, 14, 15, 25-28) 7NPDS 281 Forensic Dentistry 14NPDS 218 Management of Dental and Medical Emergencies 2NPDS 221 Naval Operational Management 14NPDS 291 Occlusion (Prosthodontics) 52NPDS 225 Operative Dentistry 39NPDS 285 Orofacial Pain 32NPDS 240 Orthodontics 17NPDS 222 Pediatric Dentistry (hours 1-4) 4NPDS 241 Periodontics 43NPDS 228 Pharmacotherapeutics in Clinical Dentistry 17NPDS 266 Prosthodontic Oral Board I 3NPDS 347 Prosthodontics Conference, Guest Seminarians 40NPDS 259 Removable Partial Dentures 26NPDS 263 Research 120NPDS 257 Seminar, Prosthodontics/Endodontics 3NPDS 351 Seminar, Prosthodontics Literature 66NPDS 362 Seminar, Prosthodontics/Oral Surgery 6NPDS 352 Seminar, Prosthodontics/Periodontics 9NPDS 356 Seminar, Treatment Planning 24NPDS 231 Systemic Disease in Clinical Dentistry 22NPDS 206 Topographical Anatomy 20Feedback Sessions 4Orientation, GMT, PRT, etc. 130Total hours 1,840SECOND-YEAR PROGRAMThe second-year program is a continuation of the first year of training, with increased emphasis onthe clinical treatment of patients and advanced concepts in prosthodontics. The resident is involvedin teaching via patient treatment presentations and seminar moderating. Assigned patients arecompleted by the end of the second year. Second-Year Curriculum
  18. 18. Course Contact HoursHSMP 215 Dentistry and the Law 30HSMP 221 Strategic Management in Dentistry 30NPDS 342 Advanced Clinic and Laboratory, Prosthodontics 1287NPDS 372 Advanced Osseointegration 18NPDS 321 Basic Life Support (Recertification) 4NPDS 349 Cleft Palate Conferences, Diagnosis and Treatment Planning 8NPDS 371 Dental Administrative Management 12NPDS 363 Dental Implantology, Patient Presentations 9NPDS 311 Ethics 7NPDS 344 Maxillofacial Prosthetics 26NPDS 256 Nutrition 6NPDS 345 Oral Boards II 6NPDS 236 Oral Pathology 34NPDS 347 Prosthodontics Conference, Guest Seminarians 40NPDS 355 Research 100NPDS 264 Research Methodology I 7NPDS 362 Seminar, Prosthodontics/Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 6NPDS 351 Seminar, Prosthodontic Literature 66NPDS 352 Seminar, Prosthodontics/Periodontics 6NPDS 292 Speech Pathology 3NPDS 354 Teaching, Prosthodontics 10NPDS 310 Teaching Methods Seminar 5NPDS 356 Seminar, Treatment Planning 24Feedback Session 1GMT, PRT, etc. 95Total hours 1,840THIRD-YEAR PROGRAMThe primary focus of the third year is on increased complexity and intensity of clinicalprosthodontics. Specific enhancement of diagnostic and treatment skills in implant prosthodontics,geriatric prosthodontics, maxillofacial prosthetics and practice management are emphasized.Additional teaching experience is gained by serving as a mentor during the Prosthodonticscontinuing education course and as mentors directing selected seminars topics for the comprehensiveDentistry Department. Prosthodontics research studies, if deemed appropriate, are submitted forcompetition and/or publication in refereed journals. Table clinics developed over a three-year periodwill be presented. The third year resident is encouraged to seek specific areas that they would liketo concentrate their endeavors, and work more independently. Advanced implant cases andtechniques will be emphasized. Third-Year CurriculumCourse Contact HoursNPDS 342 Advanced Clinic, Prosthodontics 1490
  19. 19. NPDS 372 Advanced Osseointegration 18NPDS 349 Cleft Palate Conferences, Diagnosis and Treatment Planning 8NPDS 363 Dental Implantology, Patient Presentations 9NPDS 347 Prosthodontics Conference, Guest Seminarians 40NPDS 420 Prosthodontic Oral Boards III 3NPDS 264 Research Methodology II 8NPDS 355 Research Project 50NPDS 360 Seminar, Oral Medicine 10NPDS 362 Seminar, Prosthodontics/Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 3NPDS 351 Seminar, Prosthodontic Literature 66NPDS 352 Seminar, Prosthodontics/Periodontics 6NPDS 356 Seminar, Treatment Planning 24NPDS 354 Teaching, Prosthodontics 10GMT, PRT, etc. 95Total hours 1840 Back to ContentsFELLOWSHIP IN MAXILLOFACIAL PROSTHETICSDirector: LCDR William O. Wilson, Jr.The candidate for 1-year training in maxillofacial prosthetics must have satisfactorily completed a 3-year formal training program in prosthodontics.This program is designed to train the aspiring maxillofacial prosthodontist in the rehabilitation ofpatients with congenital or acquired head and neck defects. Resultant disabilities may range fromminor cosmetic discrepancies to major functional compromises. Candidates will be exposed to anew arena of psychodynamic interactions requiring greater management skills and greater patientsensitivity. Working relationships in the hospital environment and the team approach torehabilitative services with the other medical specialties will be emphasized. Areas of patienttreatment will include acquired defects of the mandible and maxilla, palatopharyngeal function,radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and oculofacial defects. CurriculumCourse Contact HoursNPDS 372 Advanced Osseointegration 18NPDS 401 Cleft Palate Conference 25NPDS 402 Consultant Lectures and Seminars 54NPDS 403 Continuing Education Courses and Observerships 55NPDS 363 Dental Implantology, Patient Presentations 12NPDS 404 Head and Neck Surgery Observership **80NPDS 405 Head and Neck Tumor Board 41NPDS 400 Maxillofacial Clinical Prosthetics 1216NPDS 344 Maxillofacial Prosthetics 30NPDS 410 Maxillofacial Prosthetics Laboratory Procedures 200NPDS 411 Research 100NPDS 407 Seminar, Maxillofacial Prosthetics Literature 120
  20. 20. NPDS 406 Seminar, Patient Presentation (Maxillofacial Prosthetics) 3NPDS 352 Seminar, Periodontics/Prosthodontics 6NPDS 362 Seminar, Prosthodontics/Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 6NPDS 292 Speech Pathology 3NPDS 409 Teaching, Maxillofacial Prosthetics 20Orientation, GMT, PRT, etc. 95Total hours 1,840**Course hours will vary depending on availability and type of patients. Back to ContentsFELLOWSHIP IN OROFACIAL PAINDirector: Captain John F. Johnson, IIIOrofacial pain is the discipline that involves the differential diagnosis and management of pain anddysfunction of the trigeminal nerve system. More specifically, orofacial pain practitioners evaluateand treat pain and dysfunction involving the masticatory system and associated structuresthroughout the face, head, neck and shoulders that transmit sensory information into the brain viathe trigeminal nuclei.The orofacial pain residency is a two-year program that covers an extensive body of basic medicalsciences as related to the study of pain. Because of the inherent diversity of orofacial pain condi-tions, the residency incorporates clinically relevant information from a wide array of other dentaland medical disciplines. The residency curriculum also includes courses that enhance a dental offi-cer’s abilities regarding contingency roles, military leadership and personnel management. Success-ful completion of the program qualifies the resident to challenge the certification examination by theAmerican Board of Orofacial Pain.FIRST-YEAR PROGRAMThe goal of the first-year program is to provide residents with the foundational knowledge and skillsthat will enable them to participate in a multi-disciplinary pain practice. The first year programplaces a concentrated emphasis on acquiring the basic medical science information necessary to de-velop the theoretical constructs required for clinical practice. Residents are exposed to a broadrange of topics through classroom lectures, seminars and guest lectures. All residents are required toinitiate a pain related research project. Fifty percent of the first year is devoted to clinical activitiesin the Orofacial Pain Center. First-Year CurriculumCourse Contac t HoursNPDS 227 Advanced Oral Diagnosis (Advanced standing) 0NPDS 201 Applied Dental Psychology 8NPDS 273 Current Pain Literature Seminar I 30NPDS 281 Forensic Dentistry 14NPDS 218 Management of Medical Emergencies 2Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Continuing Education Course 32NPDS 285 Orofacial Pain 32NPDS 276 Orofacial Pain Concepts Seminar I 105
  21. 21. NPDS 278 Orofacial Pain Grand Rounds 30NPDS 228 Pharmacotherapeutics in Clinical Dentistry 17NPDS 263 Research 107NPDS 264 Research Methodology I (Advanced standing) 0NPDS 217 Specialty Clinic, Orofacial Pain 1301NPDS 231 Systemic Disease in Clinical Dentistry 22NPDS 206 Topographical Anatomy (hours 13-20) 6Feedback Sessions 4Orientation, GMT, PRT, etc. 130Total hours 1,840SECOND-YEAR PROGRAMThe goal of the second-year program is to refine the resident’s multi-disciplinary diagnostic andpain management skills. Pertinent neuroscience, physiology, pharmacology and psychology topicsare reinforced via seminars and guest lecturers. During the later half of the year, residents begin ro-tating through designated medical and surgical services at the National Naval Medical Center or ad-jacent medical facilities. Each resident will be required to present a completed research project.Approximately 65 percent of the second year will be devoted to clinical activities in the OrofacialPain Center and specialty rotations. Second-Year CurriculumCourse Contact HoursHSMP 215 Dentistry and the Law 30HSMP 221 Strategic Management in Dentistry 24NPDS 321 Basic Life Support (Recertification) 4NPDS 383 Orofacial Pain Specialty Rotations II 120NPDS 264 Research Methodology II 8NPDS 355 Research Project 300NPDS 381 Seminar, Current Pain Literature II 30NPDS 360 Seminar, Oral Medicine 12NPDS 376 Seminar, Orofacial Pain Concepts II 105NPDS 382 Seminar, Orofacial Pain Grand Rounds II 30NPDS 380 Seminar, Orofacial Pain Guest Lecture Series II 10NPDS 340 Specialty Clinic, Orofacial Pain 1072GMT, PRT, etc. 95Total hours 1,840 Back to ContentsCOURSE DESCRIPTIONSThe course descriptions are grouped under the following headings: Biomedical Sciences Comprehensive Dentistry Endodontics Military Dentistry Occlusion Operative Dentistry
  22. 22. Oral Diagnosis, Oral Medicine, and Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Orofacial Pain Orthodontics Pediatric Dentistry Periodontics Prosthodontics Related Topics ResearchBIOMEDICAL SCIENCESFaculty: LCDR Wilson, Dr. Gradwell, Dr. Walters, Dr. Falkler, Dr. Minah, staffNPDS 201 Applied Dental PsychologyEmphasis is placed on enhancing the residents’ appreciation of the biopsychosocial complexities oftheir patients in an effort to demonstrate how these factors impact prevention, diagnosis, treatment,and rehabilitation. Empirical reports and clinical findings will be presented which highlight avariety of psychological issues which are directly related to oral health and oral healthcare delivery.Among the psychological entities discussed are: dental phobia, pain management, depression,anxiety, patient adherence, and practitioner- patient communication. In addition, seminar materialwill also focus on managing professional stress and burnout.NPDS 202 BiochemistryThis course will review general biochemical principles and discuss the biochemical basis of currentdental topics.NPDS 203 ImmunologyThis course will stress basic and advanced immunologic concepts as they relate to the etiology andhost defense of infectious dental disease. Information will be provided on current concepts in innateimmunity, antigens, the cells involved in innate and acquired immune responses, the complementsystem, hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, immunodeficiency, and the regulation of the immuneresponse. This information will provide the resident with an understanding and rationale for thetreatment of oral health and immune-related diseases.NPDS 204 MicrobiologyInformation is presented on the current status of bacterial physiology, growth and genetics ofmicroorganisms, viruses of dental importance, host-parasite relationships, and sterilization anddisinfection. Particular emphasis is placed on the microbial flora of the oral cavity and on itsrelationship to dental plaque and caries, orofacial infections, pulp and periapical infections, anddental plaque and periodontal disease.NPDS 206 Topographical AnatomyThis is a lecture and laboratory course designed to review the anatomy of the head and neck region.The primary objective is to provide the participants with a knowledge base that strengthens theirclinical judgment. Following preparatory lectures, participants will construct in wax on ananatomical skull the ligaments of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), muscles of mastication,muscles of facial expression, muscles of the soft palate and pharynx, muscles of the floor of themouth, major salivary glands and selected vascular and neural structures. This exercise should help
  23. 23. participants better understand the relationships of various tissue planes, muscle locations, and theinterrelationships of the gross anatomy of the head and neck region. The final element of the courseinvolves dissection of fresh anatomic material at the USUHS Anatomical Training Laboratoryfollowing the same topics and objectives of the lecture and waxing laboratory segments. Emphasiswill be placed on examination and understanding of the temporomandibular joint.NPDS 377 Immunology ReviewThe basics of immunology will be presented by lecture and discussion.COMPREHENSIVE DENTISTRY Back to ContentsFaculty: CAPT Applequist, CAPT Miksch, CAPT Hartzell, LCDR Rudmann, NPDS staffNPDS 217 Specialty Clinic, Comprehensive DentistryClinical application of all phases of dentistry as practiced in the Navy in an integrated fashion and ata high level of competence.NPDS 253 Fixed ProsthodonticsLectures, demonstrations, and laboratory sessions will cover clinical and laboratory phases of fixedprosthodontics. Residents will be exposed to all phases of patient treatment in fixed prosthodonticsfrom diagnosis and treatment planning to cementation.NPDS 262 Informal Treatment Planning SeminarEach resident will present two selected cases per year before the comprehensive dentistry staff andfellow residents. In a round table setting, the resident will discuss a diagnosis, proposed treatmentplan, and treatment rationale.NPDS 279 Seminar, Operative DentistryResidents prepare abstracts and discuss articles from the operative dentistry literature. NPDS staffmembers serve as mentors for these seminars. The development of critical thinking is encouragedand developed through structured exercises in scientific and statistical analysis of selected articles.NPDS 286 Seminar, Diagnosis, Treatment Planning, and Preclinical Occlusion,This seminar is directed toward demonstrating to the resident the treatment planning formats used inthe Comprehensive Dentistry Residency, and to help them develop a logical and systematic ap-proach to diagnosing and treatment planning the patient requiring multi-disciplinary comprehensivedental care. Treatment planning exercises are included to allow immediate practical application ofthe learned skills."NPDS 288 General Dentistry Sick Call RotationThis clinical rotation provides an opportunity for comprehensive dentistry residents to gain expertiseand demonstrate competence in the following areas of general dentistry sick call: diagnosis, treat-ment planning, and definitive treatment for general dentistry sick call patients in the Dental Readi-ness clinic. The rotation consists of 72 hours for the T-2s and 32 hours for the T-1s. Any definitivetreatment provided in the rotation will be staffed by the department head of the readiness clinic.NPDS 312 Seminar, OrthodonticsTopics in orthodontics, which focus on concepts and mechanics of minor tooth movement, are cov-ered in lectures and literature review seminars.
  24. 24. NPDS 315 Pediatric Dentistry RotationThis clinical rotation provides an opportunity for comprehensive dentistry residents to gain expertiseand demonstrate competence in the following areas of pediatric dentistry: diagnosis and treatmentplanning for infant and child patients; basic restorative dentistry to include amalgams, composites,stainless steel crowns, and preventive resin restorations; behavior management and patient/parentcommunication; pulp therapy for the primary and young permanent dentition; space maintenance;current preventive dentistry techniques; and interceptive orthodontics. The rotation includes 5 fulldays of directly supervised practice in the Pediatric Dentistry Clinic. During the assigned days,comprehensive exams and treatments plans are initiated and it is the residents responsibility to fol-low the assigned cases to completion. The goals of the treatment cases are to give the resident awell-rounded experience in the practice of pediatric dentistry. The resident will complete 3 to 5restorative cases and available interceptive orthodontic/space maintenance cases. Care providedthrough this rotation will be mentored by the Chairman of the Pediatric Dentistry Department atNPDS.NPDS 317 Seminar, OcclusionResidents discuss assigned readings on articulators and the fundamentals of occlusion. The emphasisis on direct clinical applications, and the discussions are supplemented by clinical cases.NPDS 318 Special Guest Lecturers/Consultant VisitsVarious guest lecturers and consultant visits are scheduled throughout the year.NPDS 319 Specialty Clinic, Comprehensive DentistryContinuation of NPDS 217NPDS 320 Teaching, Comprehensive DentistryEach resident participates in the teaching program by preparing and presenting various presentationsand a table clinic.NPDS 323 Orofacial Pain RotationThe comprehensive dentistry residents rotate for 3 AM sessions for a total of 12 hours through theOrofacial Pain department under the direct supervision of an orofacial pain staff mentor. During theassigned days, comprehensive orofacial exams and treatment plans are initiated and it is the residen-ts responsibility to follow the assigned cases to completion. The goals of the treatment cases are togive the resident a well-rounded experience in the diagnosis and treatment of orofacial pain. Theresident will complete two assigned orofacial cases. Care provided through this rotation will bementored by the Staff of the Orofacial Pain department at NPDS.NPDS 324 General Dentistry Sick Call RotationContinuation of NPDS 288NPDS 325 Seminar, PeriodonticsResidents prepare abstracts and discuss assigned articles from the periodontic literature. NPDSperiodontal staff members serve as mentors for these seminars, which are chaired by the residents.NPDS 353 Treatment Rendered SeminarResidents prepare and orally present summaries of clinical treatment accomplished, highlightingsignificant teaching points gained during their residency training. NPDS staff members serve asmentors for these seminars. Seminars are presented in operative dentistry, orthodontics, pediatricdentistry, periodontics, and comprehensive dentistry.
  25. 25. NPDS 358 Seminar, Orofacial PainLiterature seminars reviewing and discussing the etiology, diagnosis, and conservative nonsurgicalmanagement of temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain.NPDS 359 Seminar, ProsthodonticsResidents prepare abstracts and discuss assigned articles from the prosthodontic literature. NPDSprosthodontic staff members serve as mentors for these seminars, which are chaired by the residents.NPDS 365 Seminar, Comprehensive DentistryThis seminar requires the resident to integrate and apply the didactic material learned to treatmentsituations. Alternative teaching methods such as demonstrations of techniques by faculty and dentalcompany representatives, lessons leaned, clinical exercises, current literature review, seminarsdeveloped by the residents, and presentation of treatment plans will be used.NPDS 367 Seminar, Comprehensive Dentistry ABGD Board PreparationThis seminar is a review of current topics in all specialties relating to the ABGD Board Exam.NPDS 368 Seminar, Comprehensive Dentistry ABGD Board ExaminationThree separate examinations given over the 2-year period consist of a written treatment-planningexercise, an oral examination, and a written examination. The examination is analogous to theAmerican Board of General Dentistry. Back to ContentsENDODONTICSFaculty: CAPT Tordik, CAPT Weber, CDR WebbNPDS 208 EndodonticsClassroom and laboratory instruction, as well as clinical experience, in all phases of endodontics.Emphasis on the etiology, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases and injuries that affectthe pulp and the periradicular tissues.NPDS 207 Laboratory, Surgical AnatomyA laboratory course in which the first year resident utilizes surgical techniques and performsendodontic surgery under simulated conditions. Dental operating microscope principles, ultrasonicroot end preparation techniques and current root end filling materials are emphasized.NPDS 209 Laboratory, Endodontic TechniqueLaboratory course designed to develop proficiency in a variety of endodontic instrumentation andobturation techniques before the resident applies them in the clinical situation.NPDS 210 Laboratory, Pulp MorphologyLaboratory course designed to acquaint the resident with the many anatomical variations found inthe pulp chamber and the root canal system of each type of tooth.NPDS 211 Seminar, Clinical Endodontics/Presurgical ConferenceCase presentations of first- and second-year residents are evaluated by the faculty. Challenging casesin diagnosis, case selection, and treatment are presented, defended, and evaluated. Special reports onendodontics and endodontically related subjects are presented, reviewed, and discussed.
  26. 26. NPDS 212 Seminar, Endodontics Consultant SeriesSeminars are designed to familiarize the resident with a variety of endodontic techniques andphilosophies. Prominent educators, researchers, and clinicians are invited to participate in theseseminars.NPDS 214 Seminar, Classical Endodontic LiteratureSeminars for review and discussion of the literature on endodontics and related subjects. Researchfindings as well as basic health sciences are correlated with clinical endodontics through extensivediscussion.NPDS 215 Seminar, Endodontics/Related SpecialtiesTopics of common interest to endodontics and the specialties of prosthodontics, operative dentistry,orthodontics, and periodontics, are assigned to residents, who must develop and lead discussions onthe topics.NPDS 216 Specialty Clinic, EndodonticsDesigned to provide extensive clinical experience on a specialty level for residents in endodontics.Emphasis is placed on the application of recent advancements and innovations in clinicalendodontics as well as on the treatment of unusual and challenging cases. An introduction toendodontic surgery is initiated, with cases gradually increasing in complexity.NPDS 265 Seminar, Current Endodontic LiteratureA seminar designed to identify trends in endodontic research and clinical practice and to developskills in evaluating published material. Articles from current journals are read, analyzed, abstracted,and discussed.NPDS 300 Endodontic Biology ReviewThis 3-day course, sponsored by Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is a review ofthe biology of endodontics. Areas covered include microbiology, pathology, cell biology, pulpalphysiology, odontogenic infections, and applied pharmacology. The lectures are based on classicaland current literature.NPDS 301 Rotation Through Naval Hospital, BethesdaRotation through Endocrinology, Infectious Diseases, ENT, and the Orofacial Pain Clinics isdesigned to increase the endodontic resident’s competency in physical evaluation, diagnosis, andmanagement of patients with medical complications.NPDS 302 Seminar, Clinical Endodontics/Presurgical ConferenceContinuation of NPDS 211.NPDS 303 Seminar, Classical Endodontics LiteratureContinuation of NPDS 214.NPDS 304 Seminar, Endodontics/Related SpecialtiesContinuation of NPDS 215.NPDS 305 Specialty Clinic, EndodonticsSecond year of clinical training in endodontics. Provides a diversity of surgical and nonsurgicalclinical experience, with emphasis on the treatment of challenging and unusual cases. Applicationsof recent developments and innovations in clinical endodontics are also emphasized.
  27. 27. NPDS 306 Seminar, Endodontics Consultant SeriesContinuation of NPDS 212.NPDS 308 Teaching, EndodonticsThe resident participates in the endodontic teaching program by presenting lectures and table clinics,leading seminars, and instructing in the clinic and the laboratory.NPDS 309 Laboratory, Surgical AnatomyContinuation of NPDS 207. Second year residents assume teaching responsibilities and mentor firstyear endodontics residents and comprehensive dentistry residents in performing endodontic surgicalprocedures.NPDS 364 Seminar, Current Endodontics LiteratureContinuation of NPDS 265 Back to ContentsMILITARY DENTISTRYFaculty: CAPT Castle, CAPT Munro, CDR Torske, NPDS staffNPDS 218 Management of Medical Emergencies/BLSThis course covers the diagnosis and management of common medical emergencies, with specialemphasis on patient evaluation and history taking to prevent such emergencies in the dental office.Additionally, the residents participate in an American Heart Association Basic Life Support class.NPDS 221 Naval Operational ManagementThis course examines various aspects of managing a dental health care facility in the Navy DentalCorps. It includes lectures and field trips designed to familiarize the residents with Navy and MarineCorps force structure and management. Military responsibilities of the dental officer in operationalbillets are covered.NPDS 281 Forensic DentistryThis course will provide an understanding of mass disaster management and methodologies that canassist the examiner rendering dental identification. The course includes formal lectures, aradiographic comparison laboratory, and a mass casualty laboratory. These laboratories providehands-on participation to test the student’s skill in mass disaster management and identification ofhuman remains.NPDS 321 Basic Life Support (Recertification)A review course in CPR for second-year residents. The residents participate in an American HeartAssociation Basic Life Support class.NPDS 371 Dental Administrative ManagementThis course is an introduction to the theory and practice of management as applied to the Navy’shealth care delivery system. Lectures and simulated exercises are directed toward improving thedental officer’s management skill and decision-making ability to prepare the officer for increasedresponsibility.OCCLUSIONFaculty: CAPT MikschNPDS 224 Occlusion
  28. 28. Clinically oriented presentations will focus on the application of occlusal concepts, principles ofarticulation, determinants of mandibular movement, and occlusal assessment. Emphasis will beplaced on occlusion and the periodontium. Selected course participants will review the theory anduse of dental articulators, including hands-on familiarization. Indications and principles of occlusalequilibration are discussed and applied in a laboratory exercise. Occlusal assessments/evaluationsare conducted on selected patients.OPERATIVE DENTISTRYFaculty: CAPT NordinNPDS 225 Operative DentistryThis course is designed to review the art and science of operative dentistry through lectures andhands-on laboratory exercises. Disease prevention and conservation of tooth structure are the basisof our treatment philosophy. The treatment of dental caries as an infectious disease is emphasizedthrough the discussion of state-of-the-art caries prevention and management strategies. Currentlyavailable restorative materials are detailed including rationale for selection and manipulationtechniques. Treatment planning, conservative restorative methods and the restoration of structurallycompromised teeth are discussed. Esthetic/cosmetic dentistry modalities, e.g., bleaching, DBAs(dentinal bonding agents), esthetic posterior restorations, and porcelain veneers/porcelain systemsare presented. Our goal is to provide participants with tools to enhance clinical success whenrestoring the carious, defective, or traumatically injured dentition. This course encourages thedevelopment of sound clinical rationales when providing operative dentistry as part of an overallcomprehensive treatment plan. Back to ContentsORAL DIAGNOSIS, ORAL MEDICINE, AND ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIALRADIOLOGYFaculty: CDR MeehanNPDS 226 Oral Medicine Seminar Series for AEGD/GPRThis course is a review of several important oral medicine and clinical oral pathology topics ofinterest to the PGY-1 dental resident. Topics include: radiology troubleshooting, new radiation pro-tection requirements, diagnosis and management of common oral lesions and conditions, oral mani-festations of systemic disease, top 50 drugs, pharmacology review, referral and consultations, ad-junctive diagnostic procedures, and laboratory medicine in dentistry.NPDS 227 Advanced Oral DiagnosisLectures and clinicopathological conferences designed to examine the skills essential for the collec-tion of diagnostic data in a systematic and logical fashion. Special emphasis will be placed on (1)eliciting medical and dental histories, with a review of the organ systems, (2) physical diagnoses andhead and neck examination, (3) indications for, limitations of, and interpretation of radiographicevaluations, (4) medical consultations, and (5) radiation safety. The resident will learn to synthesizethe data obtained and, consequently, establish a diagnosis for the patients chief complaint, deter-mine the significance of preexisting medical conditions, discover concomitant disease, and formu-late a treatment plan based on an accurate determination of the patients physical and emotional ca-pacity totolerate dental care.NPDS 228 Pharmacotherapeutics in Clinical DentistryLectures and
  29. 29. clinicopathological conferences designed to present the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics ofmajor drug groups, with particular reference to clinical dentistry. Topics of discussion will include(1) pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, biotransformation, and excretion) of drugs, (2) seda-tive and hypnotic agents, (3) minor tranquilizers and centrally acting muscle relaxants, (4) peripher-ally and centrally-acting analgesics, (5) local anesthetics, (6) antimicrobials, and (7) therapeuticagents recommended for management of common oral diseases. Further emphasis will be placed onthe potential interaction of drugs with medications prescribed by other health professionals. Partici-pants will be prepared to prescribe for maximum benefit and to recognize the clinical ramificationsof concomitant drug therapy.NPDS 231 Systemic Disease in Clinical DentistryThis course is a comprehensive presentation of the dental management of medically compromisedpatients. The medical and/or pharmacologic management of systemic disease is discussed, and thebasis for modification of dental therapy is highlighted. The resident will acquire knowledge essen-tial for assessing a patients ability to undergo dental care based on the recorded medical history andthecorrelation of significant clinical, laboratory, and radiographic findings. Clinicopathological con-ferences are designed to review the normal physiology of organ systems, incidence of significantvariation, and the pathophysiology of disease states of special interest to the dentist. Emphasis willbe directed towards the management of the adult patient.NPDS 284 Oral Medicine/Clinical Oral Diagnosis (for oral pathology residents)Clinical practice designed to reinforce diagnostic and patient management skills. Special emphasiswill be placed on (1) eliciting a complete medical and dental history, (2) physical examination, (3)radiographic interpretation, (4) ordering appropriate laboratory studies, (5) performing diagnostictests, (6) synthesizing a differential diagnosis, and (7) developing an effective treatment plan. Theresident will develop an appreciation for the relationship between clinical presentation andmicroscopic appearance and gain experience in the dental management of patients with serious andcomplex medical problems.NPDS 360 Seminar, Oral MedicineSeminars and clinicopathological conferences for residents in specialties other than oral medicineare designed to discuss advanced principles in the diagnosis and management of medically compro-mised patients. A practical, case-study approach is used to emphasize important principles of com-prehensive care required in both general and specialty dental practice. Back to ContentsORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL PATHOLOGYFaculty: CAPT Castle, CDR TorskeNPDS 234 Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology IResident functions as an essential member of the Navy Oral Histopathology Service. Learnsmicroscopic techniques, tissue processing, and staining methods. Prepares the gross descriptions ofassigned cases, which are reviewed by a staff member and discussed with the resident. Performs theinitial screening of cytology specimens. Gains experience in clinical pathology by examiningpatients.NPDS 235 Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology IIContinuation of NPDS 234. The resident participates in lecturing and conducting seminars for

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