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LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry

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  • 1. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 99 Contents Administration Calendar Student Aid, Student Services, and Activities Program in Dentistry Programs in Dental Hygiene Programs in Dental Laboratory Technology Master of Science in Oral Biology FacultyLouisiana State University Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry in New Orleans 99
  • 2. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 100 LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY IN NEW ORLEANS ERIC J. HOVLAND, D.D.S., DEAN Appointed to the Deanship: August 30, 1993 Appointed to the Health Sciences Center Faculty: August 30, 1993 Telephone Number: (504) 619-8500 Faculty Academic Rank: Professor of Endodontics LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry’s Homepage http://www.lsusd.lsuhsc.eduADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCILERIC J. HOVLAND, D.D.S., Dean ERIC J. HOVLAND, D.D.S. ChairmanGARY T. MCDONALD, D.D.S.Associate Dean for Clinical and Hospital Affairs JOSEPH M. MOERSCHBAECHER III, Ph.D. Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Dean of Graduate StudiesSANDRA C. ANDRIEU, Ph.D.Associate Dean for Academic Affairs SANDRA C. ANDRIEU, Ph.D. Associate Dean for Academic AffairsPAUL L. FIDEL, Ph.D.Associate Dean for Research ROBERT E. BARSLEY, D.D.S. Director of Hospital AffairsJAGDISH M. CHADHA, D.D.S.Assistant Dean for Advanced Education CHARLES H. BOOZER, D.D.S. Head of the Department of Oral Diagnosis, Medicine, and RadiologyJIM C. WEIR, D.D.S.Assistant Dean for Admissions DARLENE P. BRUNET, M.Ed. Coordinator of Student AffairsANTHONY J. DiVINCENTI, M.B.A.Assistant Dean for Fiscal Affairs JOHN O. BURGESS, D.D.S. Head of the Department of Operative Dentistry and BiomaterialsDIANA M. GARDINER, Ph.D.Director of Instructional Services, Accountability, and Planning JAGDISH M. CHADHA, D.D.S. Assistant Dean and Head of the Department of OrthodonticsVINCENT N. LIBERTO, D.D.S.Director of Continuing Education GERARD J. CHICHE, D.D.S. Head of the Department of ProsthodonticsREBECCA G. POUSSON, M.B.A.Director of Staff Development WILLIAM D. DAVENPORT, JR., Ph.D. Coordinator of Learning ResourcesALLAN P. RAPPOLD, D.D.S.Director of Clinics DOUGLAS N. DEDERICH, D.D.S. Head of the Department of PeriodonticsROBERT E. BARSLEY, D.D.S.Director of Hospital Affairs ANTHONY J. DIVINCENTI, M.B.A. Assistant Dean for Fiscal AffairsDARLENE P. BRUNET, M.Ed.Coordinator of Student Affairs CLIFTON A. DUMMETT, D.D.S. Head of the Department of Pediatric DentistryJOANNE COURVILLEAssistant to the Dean PAUL L. FIDEL, Ph.D. Associate Dean for ResearchKAREN ANKLAMCoordinator of Community Affairs DIANA M. GARDINER, Ph.D. Director of Instructional Services, Accountability, and PlanningWILLIAM D. DAVENPORT, JR., Ph.D.Coordinator of Learning Resources FRANCIS T. GIACONA, D.D.S. Elected Member, Clinical Faculty 100
  • 3. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 101BRONYA J. KEATS, Ph.D. MICHELE A. MENERAY, Ph.D.Head of Department of Genetics Elected Member, Basic Science FacultyJOHN N. KENT, D.D.S. R. RANNEY MIZE, Ph.D.Head of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Head of the Department of Cell Biology and AnatomySTEPHEN M. LANIER, Ph.D. REBECCA G. POUSSON, M.B.A.Head of the Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Director of Staff DevelopmentTherapeutics ALLAN P. RAPPOLD, D.D.S.RONALD R. LEMON, D.M.D. Director of ClinicsHead of the Department of Endodontics JOHN R. RITCHIE, D.D.S.VINCENT N. LIBERTO, D.D.S. Head of the Department of General DentistryDirector of Continuing Education CHET A. SMITH, D.D.S.RONALD B. LUFTIG, Ph.D. Elected Member, Clinical FacultyHead of the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, andParasitology WILBA S. SWEARINGEN, M.L.S. Acting Head of Medical BibliographyCAROLINE F. MASON, M.Ed.Head of the Program in Dental Hygiene WAYNE V. VEDECKIS, Ph.D. Acting Head of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyGARY T. MCDONALD, D.D.S.Associate Dean for Clinical and Hospital Affairs JIM C. WEIR, D.D.S. Assistant Dean of Admissions and Head of theKATHLEEN MCDONOUGH, Ph.D. Department of Oral PathologyActing Head of the Department of Physiology HISTORY Dental education has a long history in Louisiana, dating as far back as 1867. The LSU School of Dentistry, established in 1966, followed on the heels of the Loyola University School of Dentistry, Tulane University School of Dentistry, and the New Orleans Dental College. LSUSD is the only dental school in the state and educates 70% of the dentists entering practice in Louisiana today. Dr. Edmund E. Jeansonne, dean of the former Loyola University School of Dentistry, was appointed founding dean of the LSU School of Dentistry. The school enrolled its first class of 30 students on September 3, 1968. The agreement called for Loyola to phase out its school as the new LSU School of Dentistry came into being year by year, and the last class of Loyola-trained dentists graduated in 1971. LSUSD graduated its first class of 27 dentists on June 3, 1972. The LSU School of Dentistry is located on a 22-acre tract of land on Florida Avenue across Bayou St. John from City Park acquired from the federal government. This property had served as a United States Navy housing development during World War II. Some of the 30 frame buildings on the site were renovated to accommodate a 60-student laboratory, a 15-unit clinic, classrooms and administrative offices for faculty and support personnel. An adjacent barracks was also renovated to temporarily house the complete Loyola dental library collection that served as the nucleus for development of the LSUSD library. A grant was obtained from the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare to construct a permanent physical plant for the school. Formal dedication of the new school took place on Friday, February 18, 1972. The project cost $15,500,000, of which $5,000,000 was state funds. The 22-acre site on which the dental school sits was named William Pitcher Plaza in honor of a Covington, Louisiana, educator who served as chairman of the LSU Board of Supervisors at the time LSU acquired the site. The LSU School of Dentistry is fully accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental Association. The facility is one of the most advanced in the nation and houses outstanding basic science, preclinical, and clinical facilities. 101
  • 4. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 102CALENDAR 2002 - 2003 (subject to change)June, 2002Wednesday 5 - Registration and instrument distribution of fourth (D4) year dental class; Classes begin.Friday 7 - Orientation for D4; Summer break for D4 (group B) begins at 5:00 p.m.July, 2002Thursday 4 - Independence Day holiday.Monday 8 - Registration and instrument distribution for first (D1) and second (D2) year dental classes; Classes beginTuesday 9 - Orientation for D1; Clinical orientation and bookstore instrument distribution for D2.Friday 12 - Registration and instrument distribution for third (D3) year dental class; Registration and orientation for dental laboratory technology (DLT) II and III classes; Classes begin; Summer break for D4 (group A) begins at 5:00 p.m.Monday 15 - National Board Dental Examination, Part I for D3; Classes resume for D4 (group B).Monday 29 - Registration and clinical orientation for dental hygiene (DH) II; Classes begin.August, 2002Monday 5 - Registration and orientation for DH I and DLT I; Classes begin.Monday 19 - Classes resume for D4 (group A).September, 2002Monday 2 - Labor Day holiday.Friday 27 - White Coat Ceremony (PM) for D1.November, 2002Tuesday 26 - Thanksgiving holidays begin at 5 p.m.December, 2002Monday 2 - Classes resume at 8:00 a.m.; National Board Dental Examination, Part II for D4.Tuesday 3 - National Board Dental Examination, Part II for D4.Friday 20 - Christmas holidays begin at 5:00 p.m.January, 2003Monday 6 - Classes resume; DH and DLT registration; Fees due for dental students for second half of academic year.Friday 17 - Final date for payment of second half of fees for dental students, (without late charge).Monday 20 - Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday.February, 2003Friday 28 - Mardi Gras holidays begin at 5:00 p.m.March, 2003Thursday 6 - Classes resume at 8:00 a.m.Thursday 27 - State Board Dental Examination for D4.Friday 28 - State Board Dental Examination for D4.April, 2003Tuesday 1 - National Board Dental Examination for DH II.Thursday 17 - Easter holidays begin at 5:00 p.m.Tuesday 22 - Classes resume at 8:00 a.m.May, 2003Friday 2 - Classes end for D4, DH II, DLT II and III.Monday 5 - Classes end for D1 and DHI.Friday 9 - Classes end for DLT I.Saturday 17 - Commencement at 10:00 a.m.Friday 23 - Classes end for D2.Friday 30 - Classes end for D3. 102
  • 5. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 103CALENDAR 2003 – 2004 (subject to change)June, 2003Wednesday 4 - Registration and instrument distribution for fourth (D4) year dental class; Classes beginFriday 6 - Orientation for D4; Summer break for D4 (group B) begins at 5:00 p.m.July, 2003Friday 4 - Independence Day holiday.Monday 7 - Registration and instrument distribution for first (D1) and second (D2) year dental classes; Classes begin.Tuesday 8 - Orientation for D1; Clinical orientation and bookstore instrument distribution for D2.Friday 11 - Registration and instrument distribution for third (D3) year dental class; Registration and orientation for dental laboratory technology (DLT) II and III classes; Summer break for D4 (group A) begins at 5:00 p.m.Monday 14 - National Board Dental Examination, Part I for D3; Classes resume for D4 (group B).Monday 28 - Registration and clinical orientation for dental hygiene (DH) II; Classes begin.August, 2003Monday 4 - Registration and orientation for DH I and DLT I; Classes begin.Monday 18 - Classes resume for D4 (group A).September, 2003Monday 1 - Labor Day holiday.Friday 26 - White Coat Ceremony (PM) for D1.November, 2003Tuesday 25 - Thanksgiving holidays begin at 5 p.m.December, 2003Monday 1 - Classes resume at 8:00 a.m.; National Board Dental Examination, Part II for D4.Tuesday 2 - National Board Dental Examination, Part II for D4.Friday 19 - Christmas holidays begin at 5:00 p.m.January, 2004Monday 5 - Classes resume; DH and DLT registration; Fees due for dental students for second half of academic year.Friday 16 - Final date for payment of second half of fees for dental students, (without late charge).Monday 19 - Martin Luther King, Jr., holiday.February, 2004Friday 20 - Mardi-Gras holidays begin, 5:00 p.m.Thursday 26 - Classes resume at 8:00 a.m.March, 2002Thursday 25 - State Board Dental Examination for D4.Friday 26 - State Board Dental Examination for D4.Tuesday 30 - National Board Dental Examination for DH II.April, 2002Thursday 8 - Easter holidays begin at 5:00 p.m.Tuesday 13 - Classes resume at 8:00 a.m.Friday 30 - Classes end for D4, DH II, DLT II and III.May, 2002Monday 3 - Classes end for D1 and DH I.Friday 7 - Classes end for DLT I.Saturday 15 - Commencement at 10:00 a.m.Friday 21 - Classes end for D2.Friday 28 - Classes end for D3. 103
  • 6. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 104MISSION STATEMENT Summer Externship Program - Giving students the opportunity to learn about dentistry in other countries, communities and rural settings throughout the world is a high priority for the LSUHSC School of The mission of the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Dentistry. Each summer students travel to other areas of the state,Center School of Dentistry (LSUSD) is to serve the needs of the nation and world to experience dentistry in different environments. Thecitizens of state of Louisiana by: summer externship program is a tremendous learning experience that provides lasting benefits for all participants. § Educating future general dentists, specialists and allied dental professionals to provide excellent and current health Center of Excellence in Oral and Craniofacial Biology - The LSU care; Health Sciences Center established the Center of Excellence in 1994. § Providing a leadership role in research through investigating The benefits of an active research center for oral and craniofacial new approaches to the prevention and management of biology are numerous and extend to students, faculty, scientists and disease, developing innovative treatment modalities, clinicians in the community. The school can tap research programs expediting the transfer of knowledge for clinical use and performed within the center and offer the knowledge to students, enhancing health care delivery; and faculty and practitioners in the community. Research projects are § ·Providing health care services to the public and encouraged among students, and the Student Research Group has the disseminating information to the dental community on a opportunity to work with the Center of Excellence. local, national and international level.EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY AND SUPPORT SERVICESOBJECTIVES The Division of Learning Resources is a service department made up of three sections: Graphic Arts, Photography, and In the broadest sense, the mission of the School of Dentistry is to Television/Audiovisual. Graphic Arts offers a wide variety of servicesserve as a center for education, research, and service related to oral including medical illustrations, computer-generated slides, brochures,health. Although its primary obligation is to respond to the needs of the signs, posters, and certificates. Photography works closely with thestate of Louisiana, it strives to assume a meaningful role at a national Graphic Arts Section in the imaging and processing of computerand international level. The graduate has demonstrated and is generated slides. Other services include a fully equipped studio, aendowed with skill to render intricate and demanding patient care, complete black and white photo lab, and in-house E-6 color slideknowledge of the human organism essential to making sound clinical processing. The TV/AV Section supports and maintains the AV/TVjudgments, and an attitude of service and social responsibility equipment throughout the school. This Section also produces TV/AVtraditionally expected of the health professional. The graduate is material in their state-of-the-art studio and production suite for studentprepared to serve as the key member of the oral care team, and projects, teaching programs, and other activities requiring this medium.accordingly, the learning experience includes functioning with dentists, Scheduling and support for the three compressed video distancedental hygienists, dental laboratory technologists and dental learning rooms (two at the Dental School and one in Lafayette) areassistants. The School offers a variety of academic opportunities for done through the TV/AV Section. Auditorium and classroomdentists and allied dental professionals. There are programs at the scheduling is done through the administrative office of the Division ofpost-doctoral level to develop clinical and basic science educators, Learning Resources.highly differentiated researchers, and specialty practitioners.Continuing education opportunities offered by the School of Dentistry LSUSD Computer Services maintains and supports the LSUSDserve as an important vehicle to educate practitioners throughout their Local Area Network, which is connected via fiber optic cable to Centralcareer, keeping them abreast of the latest and most up-to-date Services at the Health Sciences Center. The LSUSD system supportsprocedures and techniques in the field of dentistry. over 300 faculty, staff, and student workstations, over 600 e-mail accounts, the computer teaching laboratory and the general access computers in the Dental Library. The services provided by LSUSD Computer Services can be broken down into the following areas: (1)SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES management services, (2) network services, (3) PC hardware and software support, (4) help desk, and (5) training lab operation and Simulation Laboratories - Two state-of-the-art simulation support. These services include but are not limited to:laboratories with a total of 60 units allow students and practicingdentists to learn the latest in dental procedures under close-to-actual Management Servicesclinic situations. It helps students to transition easily from pre-clinicalstudies to the actual treatment of patients. It also allows students § Establish network infrastructure needs and request materialexperiencing problems in the clinic to go back to simulation and correct and services from the appropriate sources to meet thosetheir deficiencies. Each station is complete with hand pieces, water needs.sprays, operator and assistant instruments, lights, mannequin heads § Purchase Software and Hardware.and articulators that closely match the clinical situation. In addition, the § Direct Supervision of Computer Services Staff.laboratory contains TV monitors and other equipment to aid in the § Coordination of Services and Responsibilities with LSUHSCeducational process. Enterprise Computer Services. Library - The LSU School of Dentistry Library, a branch of theLSUHSC Libraries, is the only complete collection of dental literature in Network ServicesLouisiana. The collection and services are open to all members of the § LAN/WAN, Internet, and File and Print, and Securitydental profession. The dental library owns more than 27,000 volumes, Services.including over 8,000 monographs and 200 current serial subscriptions. § Policy and Procedure enforcement.A web-based integrated library system provides online access to § FTP, database, Internet and Intranet web server services.library holdings and networked biomedical databases including § Electronic Messaging (e-mail).MEDLINE. Dental library faculty members teach classes and seminars § Software Management.in the use of library services and online search techniques. Other § LSUMC Master Domain and Dental School.services available are online searching, Interlibrary loan, and distance § Domain Account Management.education assistance. The library provides computers for access to § Network Monitoring.library systems, as well as a computer lab with workstations connected § Mainframe connectivity and services.to the dental school network for all computer applications. § Citrix (PeopleSoft) connectivity and services . § Maintaining backup tape software and hardware. § Network Infrastructure installation and upgrades. 104
  • 7. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 105PC Hardware and Support Services The Grace Voigt Scholarship - The late Mrs. Grace Voigt served as Director of Student Affairs from 1968-1992. In her honor the Alumni § Software troubleshooting at the desktop level. Association of the LSU School of Dentistry established the scholarship § Hardware troubleshooting and repair . fund through the LSU Health Sciences Center Foundation. The amount of the scholarship derives from the yearly earnings of the Fund. The scholarship is awarded annually to a rising second, thirdHelp-Desk Support Services and fourth year dental student who exhibits outstanding leadership, character, concern for fellow students and patients, and dedication to § LSUSD Help Desk. dentistry. § Trouble Calls. § New Hardware Purchasing Consultation. The P. Sidney Neuwirth Scholarship - This scholarship may be § Account Management. awarded to the student during the third year who, in the opinion of the § Around-the-clock support. Department of Operative Dentistry & Biomaterials, has shown the most improvement in the area of clinical operative dentistry. Dr. P. SidneyComputer Lab and Training Services Neuwirth contributes and presents the scholarship. § Maintenance of two computer labs. The Baldridge Scholarship - Due to the generous donation from the § End user training late Dr. Carl Baldridge to the School of Dentistry a scholarship fund was established through the LSU Health Sciences Center FoundationCHRONOLOGY to honor academically outstanding dental students. Scholarships are awarded annually based on the yearly earnings of the Fund. Four people have served the Louisiana State University HealthSciences Center School of Dentistry as dean since its establishment in Dental Auxiliaries1966. The names of the four former deans and the period of deanship Tracy Helm, R.D.H., Scholarship in Dental Hygiene – The family of thefollow: late Tracy Helm made a $10,000 donation to the LSU Health Sciences Center Foundation to establish a scholarship in her memory. TheEdmund Engler Jeansonne, D.D.S. (1966-1974) amount of the scholarship derives from the yearly earnings of the Fund. This scholarship is given annually to a second-year dentalAllen Anthony Copping, D.D.S. (1974) hygiene student who, in the opinion of the dental hygiene faculty, is the most outgoing, kind, and considerate of her fellow students andEdmund Engler Jeansonne, D.D.S. (1974-1976) patients.Jack Henry Rayson, D.D.S. (1976-1993) The John Lapez Scholarship – Friends of Mr. John Lapez have contributed to the LSU Health Sciences Center Foundation to establishSTUDENT AID, STUDENT the scholarship. The amount of the scholarship derives from the yearly earnings of the Fund. This scholarship may be awarded annually to anSERVICES, AND ACTIVITIES outstanding dental laboratory technology student who, in the opinion of the dental laboratory technology faculty, shows scholarship, leadership, and financial need.Loans The Deans Scholarship – Annual scholarships in the amount ofThe School of Dentistry Memorial Student Emergency Loan Fund - $500.00 are awarded to a first and second year dental hygieneEstablished as a living memorial by faculty and staff of the School and student, and a first, second and third year dental laboratoryby the dental community of Louisiana, the fund provides for interest technology student who earned the highest overall GPA.free loans to needy dental students, on a short-term basis, to coveremergency financial needs. Contributions to this fund provide a Scholarship information is available through the Office of Studentcontinual and worthy memorial. Affairs.The Carl Baldridge, D.D.S., Endowed Student Loan Fund - Due to thegenerous donation from the late Dr. Carl Baldridge to the School ofDentistry a dental student loan fund was established through the LSU AwardsHealth Sciences Center Foundation. Available loans are based on theyearly earnings of the Fund. The loan is available to first-year dental Outstanding graduates are recognized each year at a pre-students and is awarded according to the priority processing date commencement Recognition Ceremony of the School of Dentistry.established by the Financial Aid Office. Loans are based on federal Awards are presented to graduates to recognize achievements,methodology that produces Expected Family Contributions. The proficiency, and/or potential in dentistry, dental hygiene, and dentalamount and number of students depend on yearly projected student laboratory technology.costs and the need balance after the student receives Federal StaffordStudent Loan money. The loans are interest free and repayable over Dentalan 8-year period commencing 6 months after graduation. The Chancellors Award - A cash award of $1,000 is presented annually to a high ranking graduating dental student who has done theScholarships most to promote the health sciences and the School before the public. A committee of the faculty appointed by the Dean makes the selection.Dental This award was established by the Chancellor of the Health Sciences Center in 1977.The LSU Health Sciences Center Honors Scholarship - Thisscholarship is given to the student who earns the highest GPA at the The Deans Award - A cash award of $250 is presented annually to aend of the first year and it continues for the next three years, if the graduating dental student who has shown academic excellencestudent remains qualified. combined with those qualities of integrity and leadership traditionally expected of the health professional. A committee of the faculty appointed by the Dean makes the selection. Departments and organizations offer other annual awards. 105
  • 8. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 106Dental Hygiene Omicron Kappa Upsilon - A national dental honor society founded for the purpose of encouraging scholarship and advancing the ethicalThe Chancellors Award - A cash award of $250 is presented annually standards of the dental profession annually elects members from theto a high-ranking graduating student who, if the opinion of the dental fourth year dental class. Twelve percent of the graduating class forhygiene faculty, has done the most to promote the health sciences and each year may achieve the honor of such membership.the School before the public. This award was established by theChancellor of the Health Sciences Center in 1979. C. Edmund Kells Honor Society – This honor society, named after a pioneer in dentistry, is a student group established in 1971 to honorThe Deans Awards - A cash award of $100.00 is presented to the dental students who have distinguished themselves academically andgraduate who, in the opinion of the dental hygiene faculty, represents clinically. Their peers in the Society select students based onthe highest ideals of the dental hygiene profession. scholarship and professionalism. One faculty member is also selected each year to honorary membership.Departments and organizations offer other annual awards. Institutional AffiliationsDental Laboratory Technology The hospitals and other health related institutions listed below areThe Chancellors Award - A cash award of $250 is presented annually affiliated with the School of Dentistry for the training of students,to a high ranking graduating student who, in the opinion of the dental postgraduates, and residents:laboratory technology faculty, has done the most to promote the healthsciences and the School before the public. This award was established § Children’s Hospital of New Orleansby the Chancellor of the Health Sciences Center in 1979. § Earl K. Long Medical Center, Baton Rouge § Huey P. Long Medical Center, AlexandriaThe Deans Awards - A cash award of $100.00 is presented to the § Lafayette Community Health Center, Lafayettegraduate who, in the opinion of the dental laboratory technology § Lallie Kemp Regional Medical Center, Independencefaculty, represents the highest ideals of the dental laboratory § Louisiana State University Hospital Shreveporttechnology profession. § Medical Center of Louisiana at New Orleans § New Orleans Adolescent HospitalDepartments and organizations offer other annual awards. § Tulane University Hemophilia, New Orleans § Veterans Administration Hospital, New Orleans, La.Student Government Other health science facilities throughout the state are utilized at Members of the Executive Council of the Student Government various times for special and/or individual training.Association consists of one elected representative from each class,class presidents, the elected president, vice president and secretary-treasurer of the student body, and the Dental School year book editor.Elections are held annually in April. Class officers for each class are ACADEMIC STANDARDSalso elected in the spring. First year class elections are held inOctober with temporary officers serving until that time. The Academic evaluation in the School of Dentistry is based upon aAssociation provides a forum for student debates and opinions, and combination of the intellectual, technical, professional and behavioralprovides a method of dialogue between faculty and student body. The performance of a student. It is not sufficient for a student to meetAssociation has a bipartisan function in serving also as the local grading requirements, as that is only one component of the standardsChapter of the American Student Dental Association and therefore for promotion and graduation. Each student is required to meet notupholds and supports the objectives of the American Student Dental only academic standards that reflect intellectual achievement, but alsoAssociation. those that reflect technical standards and professional conduct. TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR THEHonorary and Professional Groups PROFESSIONThe American Dental Association and The American Student Dental In addition to proven academic ability and other relevant personalAssociation - Students of the School hold membership in these characteristics, the School of Dentistry expects all applicants to andorganizations. Each student receives official publications from these students of the programs in dentistry, dental hygiene, dental laboratoryassociations and is welcome to attend all scientific sessions sponsored technology and advanced education to possess and be able toby them. Other professional benefits are also available to the student demonstrate the skills, attributes and qualities set forth below, withoutthrough membership in the ADA and the ASDA. unreasonable dependence on technology or intermediaries.The American Dental Hygienists Association and the Student Physical health: The student must possess the physical health andAmerican Dental Hygienists Association - Students of the School hold stamina needed to carry out the program of dental education.membership in these organizations. Each student receives officialpublications from these associations and is welcome to attend all Intellectual skills: The student must have sufficient powers of intellectscientific sessions sponsored by them. Other professional benefits are to acquire, assimilate, integrate and apply information. The studentalso available to the student with membership in the ADHA and the must have the intellectual ability to solve problems. The student mustSADHA. possess the ability to comprehend three-dimensional and spatial relationships.Sigma Phi Alpha - Sigma Phi Alpha is the national honor society of thedental hygiene profession. Students elected to membership must rank Motor skills: The student must have sufficient use of motor skills tohigh in scholarship and character and exhibit potential qualities for carry out all procedures involved in learning the fundamental sciencesfuture growth in the profession. and those required in the clinical environment. This includes the ability to participate in relevant educational exercises and to extractDelta Sigma Delta and Psi Omega - These professional fraternities aim information from written sources.to promote the high ideals and standards of the profession, advancethe professional knowledge and welfare of their members, and provide Communication: The student must have sufficient use of the senses ofa medium through which their members, with a common interest, can speech, hearing and vision to communicate effectively with patients,develop lasting friendships. teachers and peers in both oral and written form. 106
  • 9. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 107Sensory abilities: The student must have sufficient use of the senses of PASS / FAIL GRADESvision, hearing, touch and smell to observe effectively in theclassroom, laboratory and clinical setting. Students must possess the The Pass/Fail grading system applies in certain required courses,ability to observe both close at hand and at a distance. as well as elective courses, and the criteria are specified in the evaluation section of the individual course outlines.Behavioral qualities: The student must possess emotional healthsufficient to carry out the tasks above, must have good judgment and For the Program in Dentistry, when a "Pass" grade is awarded, themust behave in a professional, reliable, mature and responsible student earns the clock hour value of the course; however, should amanner. The student must be adaptable, possessing sufficient "Fail" grade be incurred, the clock hours are charged against the GPA,flexibility to function in new and stressful environments. The student as an "F" would in any letter-graded course.must possess appropriate motivation, integrity, compassion and agenuine interest in caring for others. For the Program in Dental Hygiene and Dental Laboratory Technology, the student earns the credit hour value of the course; Each student must continue to meet all of the TECHNICAL however, should a "Fail" grade be incurred, the credit hours areSTANDARDS set forth above. A student may be denied permission to charged against the GPA, as an "F" would in any letter-graded course.continue in the education program at the School of Dentistry should thestudent fail at any time to demonstrate all of the required TECHNICALSTANDARDS. EXAMINATIONSACADEMIC PERFORMANCE Examinations may be written, oral, practical or a combination of all three. Failure to pay fees may cause a student to be restricted fromADVANCEMENT COMMITTEES taking examinations. The Department Head, or the Course Director with approval of the Department Head, has the option to re-examine The School of Dentistry has six Academic Performance any student at any time or to give the student any additional test orAdvancement Committees including one for each dental class, one for tests other than those regularly scheduled, with the objective of arrivingthe dental hygiene program and one for the dental laboratory at a more accurate evaluation of the students academic performance.technology program. The Academic Performance AdvancementCommittees are responsible for evaluating the students scholastic Examination materials will be retained by the courseperformance and progress, which shall include the students course director/department until after registration for the next academic yeargrades, compliance with the TECHNICAL STANDARDS and unless a grade appeal has been filed. Materials should be retained asdemonstration of PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT expected of a dental long as an appeal is in progress.professional. The committees meet on a regular basis throughout theyear to evaluate student scholastic progress and professionalbehavior. Students who appear to be experiencing difficulty inmaintaining the required standards are informed in writing or through PROFESSIONAL CONDUCTpersonal counseling. Each student must continue to meet therequirements of SATISFACTORY PROGRESS as defined herein. Students must demonstrate the highest standards of character and integrity that warrant the public confidence and trust bestowed on them as health professionals. The standards for PROFESSIONALGRADING SYSTEM CONDUCT are included in the LSUSD Student Handbook of Policies and Procedures. Among the elements of professionalism, each student must adhere to the following specific standards: The School of Dentistry uses the letter grades of A, B, C, D and Ffor final course grades. Numerical values are established by the 1. Each student must exhibit professional courtesy towardAcademic Performance Advancement Committee and published in the faculty, supporting staff, fellow students and patients.LSUSD Student Handbook of Policies and Procedures. The grades ofA, B, C and D indicate passing work, with "A" being the highest grade 2. Each student must maintain up-to-date, accurate andgiven. The School of Dentistry also employs an "I" grade for complete records regarding treatment performed on patientsincomplete course work that is assigned when the reason for the and patient fees.incomplete course work can be verified as beyond the studentscontrol. The deficiency must be removed by the student, at which time 3. No student shall deviate from treatment plans unless thethe "I" will be converted to the letter grade the student has earned. The deviation is authorized and documented in writing by the"F" grade indicates failure in a course. The LSU Health Sciences appropriate faculty.Center, Office of the Registrar, notifies each student of his/heracademic standing in writing at the end of the academic year. 4. No student shall jeopardize the well being of a patient under any circumstances. For the Program in Dentistry, the grade point average (GPA) isderived by multiplying the clock hours total by the quality points earned All documented reports of non-compliance with the standards ofand dividing that product by the total number of hours attempted. PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT specified above are forwarded to theProportional weight is given to the number of clock hours in each appropriate Academic Performance Advancement Committee forcourse. An "A" has the value of 4 quality points, B = 3 quality points, C review. The Academic Performance Advancement Committee may= 2 quality points, D = 1 quality point, and F = no quality points. Thus a deny a student permission to continue in the educational program2.0 GPA is equivalent to a "C" average. should the student fail to demonstrate PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT. For the Programs in Dental Hygiene and Dental LaboratoryTechnology, the grade point average (GPA) is derived by multiplyingthe number of credit hours assigned to each course by the qualitypoints earned and dividing that product by the total number of credit ATTENDANCEhours attempted. Proportional weight is given to the number of credithours in each course. An "A" has the value of 4 quality points, B = 3 LSUSD has a standard policy for attendance in all didactic and pre-quality points, C = 2 quality points, D = 1 quality point, and F = no clinical courses as well as a policy for attendance in all clinical courses.quality points. Thus a 2.0 GPA is equivalent to a "C" average. These policies are included in the LSUSD Student Handbook of Policies and Procedures. 107
  • 10. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 108Case 1: Didactic and Pre-clinical Courses: The Academic Performance Advancement Committee may deny a student permission to continue in the educational program when the students conduct, attitude, mental or physical fitness cast grave doubt Students are required to attend all scheduled upon the students professional capabilities.appointments/sessions in each course. Students not present whenattendance is taken will be considered absent. Absence in excess of20% of the total clock hours in any course will result in a final grade The Academic Performance Advancement Committee will considerreduction of one letter grade for that course. Each department will for promotion a student who has achieved a grade point average of 2.0determine general policy for monitoring attendance in assigned or better, has not failed courses during the academic year, hascourses. continued to meet the required TECHNICAL STANDARDS of the profession and has continued to demonstrate PROFESSIONAL There are no excused absences with this policy. The only exception CONDUCT. The student must satisfactorily complete all requirementsis an approved LEAVE OF ABSENCE, as described herein. in each course. The student who has achieved a grade point average of 2.0 or better and has incurred deficiencies (a grade of "I" or "F") thatCase 2: Clinical Courses: the committee has not considered excessive may be allowed to remove the deficiencies in order to be considered for promotion. A mid- All third and fourth year dental students will be required to attend year review is made for all students in all programs. All students with90% of the clinic sessions scheduled for them in order to be promoted grade point averages below 1.0 will be dropped from the rolls forand/or to graduate. Lab work sessions, personal commitments and academic deficiencies. Dental hygiene or dental laboratory technologyillness are included in the 10% missed sessions allowed. Students, students with grade point averages below 1.5 will be dropped from thewho exceed the 10% missed sessions, will be allowed to remediate by rolls for academic deficiencies (applies to programs on semesterworking in clinic sessions. Remediation will begin as soon as possible basis). The committee may require a student with a grade pointafter the completion of the academic year. This will only be permitted average between 1.70 up to and including 1.99 to be dropped from theduring the available scheduled clinic sessions before the start of the rolls for poor scholarship. A student with a grade point average belownext year. If there are not enough sessions available, the third-year 1.70 will be dropped from the rolls for poor scholarship. The Academicstudent will not be promoted to the fourth-year. Fourth-year students Performance Advancement Committee may drop from the rolls at anywho cannot complete their remediation prior to graduation will graduate time during the academic year a student who has incurred excessiveat the next regularly scheduled LSU Health Sciences Center deficiencies (a grade of "I" or "F"), has failed to satisfactorily meet thegraduation. required TECHNICAL STANDARDS or has failed to demonstrate PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT. Any student of a School of DentistrySTATEMENT OF SATISFACTORY program who has been dropped from the rolls for academic reasons and has been recommended to further pursue certain courses orPROGRESS activities, may upon satisfactory completion of said courses or activities, petition the Academic Performance Advancement CommitteeThe Academic Performance Advancement Committees evaluate the for readmission to repeat that academic year.qualitative and quantitative academic progress of each student andallow the students continued enrollment in the School of Dentistry ifthe student is making satisfactory progress. In order to achieve the When a student is readmitted to repeat an entire academic year,status of satisfactory academic progress, the student must meet the only the course grades achieved in the repeat year will be used tofollowing minimum standards: compute satisfactory academic progress for promotion and graduation. The students complete transcript (grades for all work attempted) while 1. The student must satisfactorily complete all requirements in enrolled in the School of Dentistry will still be used for all other each course. purposes. 2. The student must maintain a 2.0 grade point average for each term. Each dental student must complete the four-year curriculum in no more than six years after initial enrollment and no year may be 3. The student must satisfactorily meet all TECHNICAL repeated more than once. Each dental hygiene student must complete STANDARDS. the two-year Bachelor of Science Degree program curriculum in no more than three years after initial enrollment and no year may be 4. The student must demonstrate PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT repeated more than once. Each dental laboratory technology student and an attitude of service and responsibility that is expected must complete the two-year Associate of Science Degree program of all health professionals. curriculum in no more than three years after initial enrollment, and no year may be repeated more than once. The time granted a student for A student not satisfactorily completing all course requirements may a LEAVE OF ABSENCE will not be included in the maximum timebe permitted to remediate or required to repeat an entire academic period for completion of the program.year of study. A student not satisfactorily meeting all of theTECHNICAL STANDARDS or satisfactorily demonstratingPROFESSIONAL CONDUCT expected of a health professional may The Academic Performance Advancement Committee will notbe denied at any time permission to continue in the educational approve the promotion of a student to the next succeeding class or forprogram at the School of Dentistry. With the approval of the Dean, the graduation until the student has demonstrated SATISFACTORYcommittee will recommend that a student who is not making PROGRESS. When a student has incurred deficiencies in any course,satisfactory progress be dropped from the rolls of the school. the department involved specifies, with the approval of the Academic Performance Advancement Committee, the method of removing deficiencies. The student must promptly remove all deficiencies in order for the Academic Performance Advancement Committee toPROMOTIONS evaluate the students progress prior to registration. A student whose performance is unsatisfactory, including receiving a failing course grade, failing to meet the required TECHNICAL STANDARDS or failing After a student has been admitted to the School of Dentistry, the to demonstrate PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT may be considered forstudents advancement to the next succeeding class and ultimate dismissal or appropriate academic probation at any time the Academicgraduation depend on the students demonstration of SATISFACTORY Performance Advancement Committee feels such action is in the bestPROGRESS as defined above and the approval and recommendation interest of the school and/or the student involved.of the Academic Performance Advancement Committee. 108
  • 11. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 109ACADEMIC APPEALS CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY POLICY Alcohol abuse and the illegal use or abuse of other drugs areFINAL GRADES associated with health, safety and social problems. Students may obtain assistance for alcohol and/or drug problems voluntarily through Appeals of final course grades must be initiated by the student the LSUHSC Campus Assistance Program (CAP) or through anwithin five working days of receipt of the disputed grade. To appeal a outside provider. School of Dentistry administration may formally referfinal course grade, the student must first meet with the course director a student to CAP for a substance abuse evaluation. Any student whoto discuss the situation and attempt to arrive at a solution. If the matter refuses formal referral for evaluation and/or treatment for chemicalis not resolved between the student and the course director, and the dependency or who is unsuccessful in a treatment program forstudent wishes to pursue the appeal, the student must then make a chemical dependency is subject to suspension from the School ofwritten request to the head of the department in which the course was Dentistry by the dean. If a student returns to school after obtainingtaught asking for a meeting with the department head and the course treatment for chemical dependency, the student will be given thedirector. The department head shall arrange a meeting within 10 opportunity to sign a Continuation of Enrollment Agreement with theworking days of receipt of the request and, at the close of the meeting School of Dentistry which outlines continued compliance with chemicalor within five working days thereafter, the department head shall dependency treatment recommendations. Failure to comply with therender a decision. The department head shall inform all parties of the terms of this agreement may result in termination from the School ofdecision in writing. If the student is dissatisfied with the decision Dentistry.reached, the student may appeal to the Ad Hoc Academic AppealsCommittee. The committee shall consist of three faculty members REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATIONappointed by the dean of the School of Dentistry. The students appealto the Standing Appeals Committee must be made within five workingdays after notification of the department heads decision. The Standing 1. The student must have fulfilled all requirements of eachAppeals Committee shall make a decision within fifteen working days course and have an overall 2.0 grade point average.from receipt of the students appeal. 2. The student must have met all of the required TECHNICAL STANDARDS.ACTION OF ACADEMIC PERFORMANCEADVANCEMENT COMMITTEES 3. The student must have demonstrated standards of professional character, conduct and integrity, which warrant the public confidence and trust bestowed on them as health Appeals of action(s) taken by the Academic Performance professionals.Advancement Committee must be appealed within 5 working daysafter receipt of notification of the committee action(s). The appeal must 4. The student must have the approval of the appropriatebe in writing to the dean and contain the following information: (1) a Academic Performance Advancement Committee, the Dean,statement of the actions complained of, (2) the relief requested, and (3) the Administrative Council, the general faculty of the schoola specific statement of the reasons supporting the relief sought. The and the LSU Board of Supervisors.dean or his assignee may recommend the matter to the AcademicPerformance Advancement Committee for consideration of additional 5. The student must have met all financial obligations to theevidence. The committee shall make its recommendation to the dean School and the LSU System at least ten days beforewithin 5 working days of the hearing. Acting on the committees advice graduation.or independently, the dean shall render a decision. The dean shallmake a decision within 30 days from receipt of the students appeal.The decision shall be in writing and copies of the decision shall begiven to all parties. The decision of the appeal reached by the dean WITHDRAWALSrepresents the final level of due process in the School of Dentistry. A student who, for legitimate reasons, is unable to return to schoolDISCIPLINARY MISCONDUCT at the opening of any semester or who, for acceptable reason, must discontinue school during the academic year, will ordinarily be Disciplinary misconduct occurring within or outside the confines of permitted to withdraw in good standing. A student who withdraws fromthe teaching programs will subject the offending student to appropriate the School will receive a "W" grade for each course that is less thandisciplinary measures that can include dismissal. A student who is 80% completed, according to assigned clock hours. For courses thataccused of such offenses will be given an opportunity to establish are 80% or more complete at the time of withdrawal, a "W" will beinnocence before the Student Affairs Committee. At the time of recorded when student performance is satisfactory or an "F" will bematriculation, all students are furnished with a complete set of policies recorded when student performance is unsatisfactory. A student whoand procedures including all phases of due process relating to has withdrawn in good standing may apply for readmission on thedisciplinary misconduct. basis of the students status at the time of withdrawal. In general, a student will not be considered for readmission if the absence has been for more than two consecutive years. LEAVE OF ABSENCE The Dean or his assignee may grant a petition for a short leave of absence in case of illness, pregnancy, approved participation at a professional meeting, or any emergency, with the explicit understanding that the student will arrange with the faculty involved to satisfactorily make up all the work the student will miss. Extended medical or personal leaves of absence will be considered through the Deans office on a case by case basis. 109
  • 12. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 110 1. Attendance for at least three full academic years at a collegePROGRAM IN DENTISTRY of arts and sciences accredited by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, andADMISSIONS completion of not less than 90 semester hours of credit prior to the date of School of Dentistry registration, subject to theMethod Of Application limitations given in the section on evaluation of college records. The above minimum requirements may not necessarily be completed prior to application for admission. 1. After September 1 of the year prior to anticipated admission, Approval of admission is tentative, pending satisfactory request an application from the Office of Admissions, LSU completion of minimum requirements and maintenance of a School of Dentistry, 1100 Florida Avenue, New Orleans, LA satisfactory academic record before the date of registration. 70119-2799. A new application and related materials, including transcripts and recommendations, must be Satisfactory completion of the following college courses: submitted each year that an individual desires to be considered for admission. 2. An official transcript from each college or university attended Semester must be sent by the registrar of each institution directly to the Courses Hours Office of Admissions, LSU School of Dentistry, 1100 Florida Biology / Zoology with Laboratory ------ 12 Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70119-2799. Inorganic Chemistry with Laboratory ---- 8 3. Recommendations by the pre-dental advisory group or by Organic Chemistry with Laboratory ------ 8 two science faculty members who have recently taught the General Physics with Laboratory -------- 8 applicant are required. The recommendations are submitted English -------------------------------- 9 directly to the Office of Admissions, using a form supplied by the office. Special forms devised by pre-dental committees 2. Attainment of an acceptable quality point average. for submitting evaluations are acceptable. 4. A recent, passport-type photograph, full-face view, must 3. Submission of acceptable scores on the Dental Admission accompany the application form. Test. 5. The applicants Dental Admission Test scores must be sent from the American Dental Association. 4. Possession of all the TECHNICAL STANDARDS set forth under ACADEMIC STANDARDS.Dates For Filing 5. Personal interview. Completed applications for admission to the first-year class must besubmitted by February 28 of the year the student expects to be Other Admission Informationadmitted. Applicants must take the Dental Admission Test and submitthe result, along with supplementary evaluation data, such as official Evaluation of College Records—Grade point averages aretranscripts and pre-dental faculty recommendations by the application calculated from all college hours attempted. In calculating the qualitydeadline. point average, grades recorded in institutions at which D is the lowest passing grade are interpreted as follows: A = 4, B = 3, C = 2, D = 1,Personal Interview and F = 0. Correspondence courses and courses in military science, physical education, and other such subjects are not considered in Following review of all application materials, competitive applicants determining the quality point average or the total number of semesterwill be invited for an interview. The interview is important to both the hours required for admission. Other courses for which admission creditapplicant and the admissions committee. It allows the applicant to see is not given are those that relate specifically to a professionalthe School and talk with both students and faculty. It allows the curriculum such as law, medicine, dental hygiene, dental laboratorycommittee to evaluate the applicant on interest, enthusiasm and social technology, education, pharmacy, agriculture, etc.awareness-qualities important for a dentist but which cannot bemeasured by standardized tests. Also, on the day of the interview, Other Recommended Courses - Courses which will assist in theeach applicant takes a chalk carving test as a second measure of development of manual skills such as drawing, ceramics and sculpturemanual dexterity. are strongly recommended. Advanced courses in biological sciences, such as cell and molecular biology, genetics, microbiology, comparative anatomy,Dental Admission Test physiology, biochemistry and histology are strongly recommended. The Division of Educational Measurements of the American Dental Courses in advanced mathematics, psychology, social studies,Association provides the opportunity for a dental school applicant to economics, speech, and philosophy (logic) are also desirable.take this test in the spring or fall of each year. The results of thecandidates performance on this test must be submitted to the Selection of Courses - It is strongly recommended that those whoCommittee on Admissions by the February 28 deadline date of the wish to prepare themselves for the study of dentistry should enroll in ayear of application. Registration forms for the test may be obtained degree curriculum in college. While most applicants follow a programfrom the School of Dentistry or from the Division of Educational in biology or chemistry, it is quite possible for those from other majorMeasurements, American Dental Association, 211 East Chicago disciplines to receive favorable consideration for admission to dentalAvenue, Chicago, Ill. 60611. For additional information about this test, school. Care should be exercised in planning the course of study to bestudents should consult their pre-dental advisors or contact the Office certain that the required subjects in chemistry, biology, physics, andof Admissions of the School of Dentistry. english can be completed satisfactorily before the date for registration. If the student does not enroll in a degree curriculum, it is consideredMinimum Requirements important to follow a program which will allow time to take several of the strongly recommended subjects and to complete more than the Admission to the LSUHSC School of Dentistry is done on a specified minimal number of required courses and credit hours.competitive basis. The following preparation and achievement is Elective courses should be chosen in relation to the students specialrequired for consideration for admission. interests and aptitude. An understanding of social and community problems will be very helpful in meeting the responsibilities of the profession of dentistry. In addition to a good technical education, it is desirable for the student to have a broad cultural background. 110
  • 13. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 111 Residency - Admissions preference is given to residents ofLouisiana. Residents of Arkansas will be considered under theguidelines of the Arkansas Health Education Loan Program. A limited PROGRAM IN DENTISTRYnumber of slots may be available for residents of other states. FIRST YEAR CURRICULUMCOMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS Basic Science Courses Hours Responsibility for selection of entering students has been delegatedto the Committee on Admissions by the faculty. When all necessary DENT 1101 Gross Anatomy -------------------- 140data, credits, and other required information for each application have DENT 1112 General and Oral Microanatomy ---- 111been received and evaluated, the applicant is considered by the DENT 1113 Biochemistry --------------------- 86Committee. DENT 1114 Dental Neuroscience -------------- 36 DENT 1115 Physiology ----------------------- 108Provisions Governing Acceptance of Clinical Science CoursesApplicant DENT 1103 Fundamentals of Operative1. All offers to accept an applicant for admission to the School of Dentistry ------------------------ 220Dentistry are regarded as provisional acceptances. These are based DENT 1104 Oral Diagnosis I ----------------- 38on evidence submitted at the appropriate time that all required course DENT 1105 Fundamentals of Dental Radiology - 22work has been completed prior to the time for registration. The DENT 1106 Introduction to Preventiveapplicant must also demonstrate a continuation of a satisfactory Dentistry and Preclinical Dentalpersonal performance, and a level of academic achievement which is Prophylaxis ---------------------- 68compatible with ability previously demonstrated. DENT 1107 Dental Morphology ---------------- 72 DENT 1108 Principles of Occlusion ---------- 482. Applicants must notify the Office of Admissions of their desire to DENT 1109 Professional Development I ------- 34accept a place in the class within the time specified in the acceptance DENT 1110 Dental Information Management Skills 12letter. Failure to notify the office promptly will be considered as DENT 1111 Infectious Disease Control ------- 7sufficient reason to withdraw the offer. Acceptance of the offer for DENT 1116 Growth and Development ----------- 21admission should be accomplished in the manner specified in theacceptance notice. TOTAL for first year ----------------------- 10233. It is improper for an applicant to hold more than one place ofacceptance at any one time. An applicant who accepts a place in theclass is under obligation to cancel the acceptance of places that mayhave been established previously with other schools. It is also to beunderstood that if an applicant who has accepted a place with theSchool of Dentistry subsequently decides to attend another school, theapplicant will provide prompt notification of the change in the PROGRAM IN DENTISTRYacceptance status. SECOND YEAR CURRICULUM4. Prior to enrollment at the School of Dentistry students will berequired to submit to a variety of medical tests including: serologic Basic Science Courses Hourstests for hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human DENT 2120 Microbiology ---------------------- 120immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Section 1207 of the State Board of DENT 2121 General Pathology ----------------- 60Dentistry Regulations and LSA-R.S. 37:751D require "self-reporting" of DENT 2122 Pharmacology ---------------------- 66seropositivity for these viruses. In such cases the Board of Dentistrymay restrict or prohibit seropositive individuals from practicing dentistryor dental hygiene, including participation in programs at the School of Clinical Science CoursesDentistry. In accordance with these provisions, it will be necessary for DENT 2102 Preclinical Fixed Prosthodontics -- 128students in the dental and dental hygiene programs to demonstrate DENT 2103 Introduction to Complete Dentures - 63seronegativity for HBV, HCV, and HIV prior to enrollment. DENT 2104 Removable Partial Denture Design -- 26 DENT 2105 Introduction to Clinical Operative Dentistry ------------------------- 112 DENT 2106 Introduction to Periodontics ------ 83CURRICULUM IN DENTISTRY DENT 2107 Oral Diagnosis II ----------------- 28 DENT 2108 Diagnostic Radiology -------------- 19 DENT 2109 Oral Surgery ---------------------- 18General DENT 2110 Treatment Planning I -------------- 13 DENT 2111 Professional Development II ------- 19 DENT 2112 Principles of Occlusion Equilibration 44The curriculum in dentistry represents a blend of basic, clinical and DENT 2113 Special Denture Techniques -------- 28social sciences covering all four academic years. It is formally DENT 2114 Preclinical Endodontics ----------- 72structured to present the basic principles, concepts, and philosophies DENT 2115 Dental Materials Science ---------- 52of dentistry, yet flexible to allow for individual student capabilities and DENT 2116 Introduction to Removable Partialinterests. Its goal is to inspire the student to academic greatness by Dentures -------------------------- 48enhancing and facilitating the correlation of learning experiences. The DENT 2117 Pediatric Dentistry Lecture I ----- 19diagonal format that extends clinical and basic sciences over the entire DENT 2118 Introduction to Orthodontics ------ 18four years was used in planning the curriculum. As the emphasis on DENT 2119 Preclinical Esthetics ------------- 57basic and pre-clinical sciences decreases from year one to year four, DENT 2123 Pain Control I -------------------- 26the students exposure to the clinical sciences increases. The DENT 2124 Pain Control II - Part A ---------- 24objectives of this approach are to help the student interrelate the basicand clinical sciences and to fully comprehend patient care and itsrationale. TOTAL for second year -------------- 1143 111
  • 14. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 112 PROGRAM IN DENTISTRY FOUR-DIGIT PROGRAM IN DENTISTRY COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM THIRD YEAR CURRICULUM An explanation of the four-digit course numbering system is as follows:Basic Science Courses Hours The first digit represents the year; the second digit represents theDENT 3124 Oral Pathology ------------------- 84 semester; the third and fourth digits represent the sequencing of courses.Clinical Science CoursesDENT 3101 Preclinical Orthodontics --------- 24DENT 3102 Pediatric Dentistry Lecture II --- 21 COURSE DESCRIPTIONSDENT 3103 Implants in Dentistry I ---------- 19DENT 3104 Clinical Removable Prosthodontics 140 DENT 1101 Gross AnatomyDENT 3105 Advanced Clinical Operative Dentistry 149 The purpose of this course is to teach the structures of the adultDENT 3106 Intermediate Periodontics -------- 111 human body and their relationship to one another to provide theDENT 3107 Clinical Fixed Prosthodontics ---- 125 student with a working knowledge of human anatomy. It consists ofDENT 3108 Pediatric Dentistry Clinic ------- 85 lectures and laboratory dissection. The first half of the courseDENT 3109 Clinical Endodontics ------------- 84 examines the upper extremity, thorax and abdomen. The remainder ofDENT 3110 Advanced Oral Surgery ------------ 20 the course examines structure of the head and neck. Lecture materialDENT 3111 Clinical Orthodontics ------------ 40 is supplemented with models, films and television tapes. RadiologicalDENT 3112 Oral Diagnosis III and Treatment material of the head and neck is also provided. (Department of Cell Planning II ---------------------- 58 Biology and Anatomy)DENT 3113 Dental Radiology III ------------- 41DENT 3115 Oral Oncology -------------------- 18DENT 3116 Oral Medicine and Pharmacology --- 14 DENT 1103 Fundamentals of Operative DentistryDENT 3117 Internal Medicine ---------------- 24 This lecture and laboratory course teaches the basic principles ofDENT 3118 Introduction to Temporomandibular cavity design and restoration to prepare students for clinical operative Joint Dysfunction ---------------- 28 dentistry. It teaches procedures necessary to restore teeth withDENT 3119 Pain Control II - Part B --------- 10 amalgam, cast gold and composite resin. Current bonding systemsDENT 3120 Clinical Oral Surgery ------------ 54 and adhesive dentistry will be introduced. Cavity preparations areDENT 3121 Dental Radiosurgery and Laser Surgery 20 made and restorations placed in extracted natural teeth and plasticDENT 3122 Professional Development III ----- 28 teeth in a typodont. The typodont mounted on a mannequin simulatesDENT 3123 Implants in Dentistry II --------- 20 closely the clinical practice of operative dentistry. (Department of Operative Dentistry and Biomaterials)TOTAL for Third year ----------------------- 1217 DENT 1104 Oral Diagnosis I An introductory course in oral diagnosis, including didactic and clinical instruction in the techniques of diagnosis. The course will cover the case history, examination of the patient, the use of various diagnostic aids, charting procedures, normal anatomy and radiographic techniques. The clinical portion of the course will provide the student PROGRAM IN DENTISTRY with experience in the application of several diagnostic techniques. FOURTH YEAR CURRICULUM (Department of Oral Diagnosis, Medicine and Radiology)Basic Science Courses Hours DENT 1105 Fundamentals of Dental RadiologyDENT 4101 General Practice ----------------- 1008 An introductory course in dental radiology, including didactic instructionDENT 4102 Senior Intermediate Periodontics - 50 in radiation physics, radiation biology, radiation hygiene, andDENT 4103 Professional Development IV ------ 58 radiographic techniques. This course also includes an introduction toDENT 4104 Pain Control III ----------------- 18 the radiological interpretation of normal anatomy, caries, periodontalDENT 4105 Diagnosis and Treatment of disease, and periapical disease. (Department of Oral Diagnosis, Toothache ------------------------ 8 Medicine and Radiology)DENT 4106 Rotation in TMJ Clinic ----------- 12DENT 4107 Rural Practice Rotation ---------- 125DENT 4108 Advanced Treatment Planning DENT 1106 Introduction to Preventive Dentistry and Pre- Seminar -------------------------- 44 clinical Dental Prophylaxis The preventive dentistry component of the course introduces theTOTAL for fourth year ---------------------- 1323 student to the theory and practice of preventive dentistry at both the public health and individual patient care levels. Through the pre-clinical dental prophylaxis component the student gains and applies principles and techniques for oral prophylaxis treatment of a dental patient. ThisElective Courses 0-100 information is taught using a lecture, laboratory and clinical format. (Department of General Dentistry)TOTAL ------------------------- 1323-1423 DENT 1107 Dental Morphology The students first introduction to the science and art of dentistry, this course examines teeth and their morphology. The students will also develop their artistic and manual skills by carving wax replicas of representative teeth within physiologic parameters. (Department of Prosthodontics and Operative Dentistry and Biomaterials) 112
  • 15. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 113DENT 1108 Principles of Occlusion DENT 1114 Dental NeuroscienceThis course teaches the physiology of dental occlusion. Certain The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the structureconcepts will be developed to enable the learner to recognize normal and function of the human nervous system, including pathologicalstructure and normal function of the masticatory system. The focus is conditions and associated neurological deficits. This section provideson mandibular reference positions and mandibular border and the student with the following information: regional organization of thefunctional movements. (Department of Prosthodontics) central nervous system, specialized structure of neurons, ionic basis of the action potential and synaptic transmission, organization of major sensory and motor pathways and sensorimotor integration,DENT 1109 Professional Development I mechanisms of pain modulation and clinical approaches to painThis lecture/seminar course is offered in the freshman year and is part management and cortical integration. (Department of Cell Biology andof the four-year program to foster professional growth. Designed for Anatomy)the first-year dental student, it provides information to help the studentin the transition into professional school and to meet the later demands DENT 1115 Physiologyof the practice of dentistry. The purpose of the course is to introduce The principles of cellular and organic functions, and of the regulationthe student to the profession and includes such important topics as and coordination of action of all major organs and systems are studied.dental ethics and professional behavior, skills to cope with the rigors of Emphasis is placed upon topics that exhibit specific relationships to thethe dental school curriculum, stress and time management, cross health of oral structures, and activities that bear direct relationship tocultural awareness, opportunities in dentistry and the future of the problems that arise in dentistry. Computer teaching aids, includingprofession. (Department of General Dentistry) didactic animations and power-point presentations, are used in this course. The laboratory is modern. It utilizes computer recording and analysis for student experiments. Problem solving is also a part a partDENT 1110 Dental Information Management Skills of the laboratory environment. The subjects that are studied inThis course teaches dental students the significance, structure, scope, laboratory experiments and presented in demonstrations are correlatedand availability of information in dentistry and related biomedical closely with lectures and conferences. (Department of Physiology)subjects. By learning how to access and evaluate dental information,students develop skills applicable to course work, patient care and DENT 1116 Growth And Developmentresearch. This course includes instruction in searching MEDLINE, the The purpose of this course is to introduce the learner to basic conceptsInternet and additional online databases. Exercises requiring use of of growth and development in the child. Subjects include the birthlibrary tools familiarize students with dental library resources. process, general body growth, neurologic development, craniofacial(Department of Medical Bibliography) growth, personality development, language development and dental development. Lectures, by authorities in these particular fields and assigned reading, augmented with audiovisual materials, are theDENT 1111 Infectious Disease Control methods of instruction. (Department of Pediatric Dentistry)This is an introductory course providing instructions in blood-borneinfections—AIDS and Hepatitis. The epidemiology and prevention of DENT 2120 Microbiologythese diseases is presented and a complete infection control policy is This comprehensive course covers the basic principles of bacteriology,presented and discussed in order that the student may function mycology, virology, immunology, parasitology and the application ofproperly in a dental setting. Federal, state, OSHA and LSUHSC these subjects to the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of infectiouspolicies concerning legal issues are also discussed. (Oral Diagnosis, diseases. Lectures are supplemented by informal laboratory groupMedicine and Radiology) discussions. Accompanying laboratory exercises, constituting a major portion of the program, are designed to illustrate principles underlying each area of basic as well as practical diagnostic microbiology. MajorDENT 1112 General and Oral Microanatomy emphasis is on the oral microflora and immune mechanisms in relationThis course includes basic cell biology, cell ultrastructure, tissue and to disease states with oral manifestations. Clinical correlations areorgan microanatomy and the development and microanatomy of the provided in specific areas by relevant dental and medical schoolcraniofacial complex. The course begins with cell biology and the clinical faculty. (Department of Microbiology, Immunology andmicroanatomy of the primary tissues and organ systems. There is in- Parasitology).depth coverage of prenatal facial development, tooth development andthe microanatomy of oral hard and soft tissues. Where applicable, the DENT 2121 General Pathologylectures correlate morphology with function as well as with basic This course is an introduction to the study of human disease: itsclinical significance. In addition to didactic information, the course also causes, mechanisms and effects. Basic principles are taught and areincludes laboratory sessions where prepared slides are studied using again emphasized when diseases of the various systems of the bodyconventional light microscropy. (Department of Cell Biology and are surveyed. Lectures are reinforced by showing gross andAnatomy) microscropic images of diseased organs and tissues, including a televised tape of a postmortem examination. (Department of Pathology, Health Sciences Center)DENT 1113 BiochemistryThis course presents an interrelated series of lectures describing the DENT 2122 Pharmacologystructure and function of chemical components of the living cell. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the rationalExamination of the physiological chemistry of the cell in health and use of drugs in dentistry. With the authority to prescribe drugs comesdisease includes the study of the chemical transformations involved in the responsibility of being knowledgeable in the use of valuable, butbiochemical genetics, macromolecule synthesis, digestion, often dangerous, therapeutic agents. It is important to recognize thatintermediary metabolism, respiration, excretion, nutrition, endocrine certain generalizations apply to all drugs. These principles of drugfunction and homeostasis. Particular emphasis is given to topics action are the initial focus of discussion. The number of drugshaving special relevance to dentistry such as blood clotting, HIV and continues to grow and will expand in the future. To limit confusion,hepatitis virus, calcification, fluoride action, composition of saliva, emphasis is placed on single, prototypical agents that aresalivary gland metabolism and biochemical aspects of caries and representative of the respective drug classes. Through this approachperiodontal disease. (Department of Biochemistry and Molecular an understanding of the properties of related agents can be moreBiology) readily achieved, and at the same time differences that may exist between them can be highlighted. Lectures are designed to familiarize the student with basic mechanisms of action of drugs in relation to their physiologic and biochemical effects, their main therapeutic uses and adverse effects. (Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics) 113
  • 16. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 114DENT 2102 Preclinical Fixed Prosthodontics DENT 2108 Diagnostic RadiologyThe fundamentals of tooth preparation for extracoronal single-crown The purpose of this course is to enable students to recognize andrestorations and fixed partial denture abutments are emphasized. name pathological changes and normal anatomy as seen on intra- andPrinciples of fixed appliance design and fabrication are covered. Also, extra-oral radiographs because in any dental treatment, diagnosis ofemphasis is placed on treatment restorations as they relate to the the pathological process is of prime importance. Radiographs, thoughperiodontium. Clinically related experience is obtained by using ivorine not the only mode for diagnosis, play a major role in enabling themannequins with specific projects and practical examinations and diagnostician to visualize structures not seen on clinical examination.competency examinations done in the state of the art simulation This course will also deal with the normal anatomic landmarks as seenlaboratory. Those aspects relating to occlusion are correlated with the on intra- and extra-oral radiographs. This knowledge will enable theocclusion courses. (Department of Prosthodontics) diagnostician to distinguish the radiographic appearance of normal from those of abnormal structures of the human jaws. (Department of Oral Diagnosis, Medicine and Radiology)DENT 2103 Introduction to Complete DenturesThis course is designed to teach the student a basic technique forrehabilitating the completely edentulous patient. This technique will be DENT 2109 Oral Surgerytaught in lecture, simulation laboratory and laboratory. Building upon The objectives of this course are to instill in the student knowledge andentering knowledge and skills, the student will be taught concepts and understanding of the principles of surgery and respect for theprinciples of denture construction in the lectures and will develop the microbiologic implications inherent in this art and science. It isnecessary skills in the laboratory to prepare the student to treat an designed to equip the student with the fundamentals of exodontia andedentulous patient in the clinic. (Department of Prosthodontics) management of its less serious complications. Clinical and psychological factors in patient evaluation are stressed. (Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery)DENT 2104 Removable Partial Denture DesignThis course uses the knowledge and skills developed in the courseIntroduction to Removable Partial Dentures as a basis for higher level DENT 2110 Treatment Planning Imastery. The didactic objectives are to enable a student to learn the An introductory course in treatment planning. Lectures,theoretical bases for diagnosis, design, and treatment planning for demonstrations, and practical exercises are utilized in the teaching ofremovable partial dentures. The laboratory sessions should enable a treatment planning based on the total needs of the patient.student to deal successfully with practical cases drawn from clinical (Department of Oral Diagnosis, Medicine, and Radiology)practice. At the conclusion of the course, a student should be able tocorrectly diagnose oral conditions which influence removable partialdenture treatment, design the denture and write a work authorization DENT 2111 Professional Development IIfor the laboratory technician. (Department of Prosthodontics) This course is an interdisciplinary course that begins with the description of public health and its relationship to the field of dentistry. The course will then cover biostatistics and epidemiology, twoDENT 2105 Introduction to Clinical Operative Dentistry disciplines which are important to a dental students ability to read andIn this course the student gains valuable clinical experience and skill in understand medical and dental literature. The objective of the course itthe art and science of operative dentistry. The student will treat the to provide the dental student the necessary knowledge to criticallypatient using the knowledge and technique acquired from previous review public health, medical and dental literature. (Department ofdidactic and laboratory course. (Department of Operative Dentistry and General Dentistry)Biomaterials) DENT 2112 Principles of Occlusal EquilibrationDENT 2106 Introduction to Periodontics This builds on the first-year course on Principles of Occlusion. In thisThis basic course in Periodontics teaches the gross and histologic course the concepts of optimal, physiologic and pathogenic dentalfeatures of the normal periodontium. Emphasis is placed on the occlusions are introduced. Also, occlusal therapy methods arerecognition of the periodontal lesions with an understanding of all the presented including dental articulators, selective grinding andetiologic factors involved in the initiation and the progression of restorative methods. (Department of Prosthodontics)periodontal diseases. Discussions and lectures stress the need toformulate a logical sequence of therapy based on sound biologicprinciples and on information obtained from a thorough clinical and DENT 2113 Special Denture Techniquesradiographic examination. A broad overview of all current and This course is a continuation of Introduction to Complete Dentures.accepted treatment procedures, both surgical and nonsurgical, is Emphasis is placed on diagnosis and basic principles of design andpresented. Pre-clinical sessions in the simulation laboratory will construction of interim dentures, single dentures and overdentures.familiarize students with the use of ultrasonic instruments. Clinical Additionally the student learns and develops the necessary skills tosessions provide the opportunity for students to evaluate, diagnose, reline, rebase and repair complete dentures. This course consists oftreatment plan, and provide nonsurgical therapy for patients with mild lecture and laboratory exercises. The concepts taught in the lecturesto moderate periodontal disease. This experience assists the student are applied in the laboratory for clinical application. (Department ofin implementing the knowledge obtained in the classroom to a clinical Prosthodontics)environment. Demonstrations of clinical procedures will include patientmanagement, proper aseptic procedures and selected surgicalprocedures. (Department of Periodontics) DENT 2114 Preclinical Endodontics The main objectives of this lecture and laboratory course are to provide the student with basic concepts and principles of endodontics, and toDENT 2107 Oral Diagnosis II facilitate student proficiency in the technical aspects of orthogradeThis course prepares students for the complete and thorough endodontic therapy. This course is intended to provide the foundationevaluation of patients. Emphasis is placed upon the evaluation of the for each student to be able to provide clinically competent endodonticpatients systemic health, diagnostic techniques and differential therapy for patients. (Department of Endodontics)diagnosis of orofacial disease entities using case-based exercises andclinical presentations. The clinical portion of this course requiresstudent to properly use and interpret diagnostic techniques in theexamination and treatment planning of assigned patients. (Departmentof Oral Diagnosis, Medicine and Radiology). 114
  • 17. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 115DENT 2115 Dental Materials Science DENT 2124 Pain Control II AThe purpose of this course is to provide an applied and working Pain Control II is the second of four courses designed to prepare theunderstanding of the fundamental nature and behavior of dental student for the management of pain and anxiety and medicalmaterials. The course includes the composition, properties, application, emergencies in the dental practice. Patient evaluation as it pertains toand manipulation of metal ceramic and polymeric dental materials. The sedation and medical emergency management will be presented at thesuccess or failure of many forms of dental treatment depends upon the beginning of the course. Didactic and clinical instruction in the use ofcorrect selection of materials possessing adequate properties, as well nitrous oxide analgesia will follow in order to qualify the student for theas careful manipulation of these materials. This course provides clinical use of this pain control modality as soon as possible. Painfundamental framework for understanding the capabilities and Control II is the course that includes majority of the LSUSD materiallimitations of dental materials. This knowledge is important for all pertaining to management of the medical emergency in dental practice.clinical courses and dental treatment that require the use of dental Preoperative and operative sedation by oral, nasal, intravenous,materials. (Department of Operative Dentistry and Biomaterials) intramuscular and rectal routes will be presented along with an introduction to general anesthesia to aid the student in gaining familiarity with these pain and anxiety management techniques.DENT 2116 Introduction to Removable Partial DenturesAs an introduction to removable prosthodontics, the student will, in this DENT 3124 Oral Pathologycourse, design and construct a removable partial denture on a This course is concerned with the study of disease processes affectingmannequin. Emphasis is placed on basic principles of design and the oral cavity and associated structures. It is designed to utilizeconstruction of removable partial denture components. Special knowledge gained in the other basic and clinical science coursesattention is also given to the technical aspects of partial denture toward an understanding of the definition, epidemiology, distribution,construction relating them biologically to the patient to make it more morphology, symptoms, etiology, treatment and prognosis of oralmeaningful. The student will also learn impression techniques, intraoral pathologic conditions. Attainment of ability to diagnose and treat oralregistrations, placement and adjustment of the prosthesis. (Department diseases is a primary objective of the course. The course will includeof Prosthodontics) study of developmental defects, infectious diseases, neoplasms, physical and chemical injuries and metabolic diseases. A segment of the course will be devoted to a conjoint study of dental caries. Included in this segment will be lectures pertaining to salivary physiology, toothDENT 2117 Pediatric Dentistry Lecture I microanatomy, and the etiology, epidemiology, microbiology,This course develops the students understanding of the principles histopathology, prevention and control of the carious process.governing the dental treatment of children. The student will review (Department of Oral Pathology)selected topics in the dental literature including the treatment oftraumatized anterior teeth, pulp therapy for primary teeth, and the DENT 3101 Preclinical Orthodonticsmanagement of the child dental patient. (Department of Pediatric The laboratory exercises in this course emphasize the fabrication andDentistry) utilization of contemporary orthodontic appliances. The course is concurrent with orthodontic clinical assignments and seminars. (Department of Orthodontics)DENT 2118 Introduction to OrthodonticsThese lectures are constructed to describe the characteristics of DENT 3102 Pediatric Dentistry Lecture IInormal and abnormal occlusion. Stress is placed on the recognition, This course is a continuation of Pediatric Dentistry Lecture I to furtherclassification, development and etiology of malocclusion. The develop the students understanding of the principles governing theinfluences of growth and development on the stomtognathic system dental treatment of children. Topics include dental arch spacewill also be investigated. The course is preparatory to Pre-clinical management, minor tooth movement, treatment of oral habits andOrthodontics given in the third-year. (Department of Orthodontics) dental care for handicapped children. (Department of Pediatric Dentistry)DENT 2119 Preclinical Esthetics DENT 3103 Implants in Dentistry IThis course will provide the student with the theoretical and practical This is an introductory course on dental implants. This course coversknowledge for using the various types of adhesive systems and resin basic concepts of implant design, biomaterials and the response of thecements (chemical, dual and light-cured), in a step by step procedure, hard and soft tissues to the implants. The course will also introduce thewhile preparing and bonding composite inlays, ceramic veneers and student to the clinical significance of the use of implants in formulatingceramic crowns. The course will provide a unified philosophy and the most appropriate treatment for a patient. (A multi-disciplinarydefine the standard procedures for students and faculty for bonding faculty from the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery,indirect restorations, leading to a unified teaching philosophy between periodontics and prosthodontics will teach this course.the three departments involved in bonding procedures. It will providethe necessary continuity from the second to the fourth year Esthetic DENT 3104 Clinical Removable ProsthodonticsClinic. In addition, sessions on bleaching will provide the students with In this course, the student will learn to diagnose and increasethe theoretical and practical knowledge for this conservative procedure proficiency in the design, fabrication and follow-up of complete(Departments of General Dentistry, Operative Dentistry and dentures, removable partial dentures, interim dentures andProsthodontics) overdentures. Through clinical experience the student will apply the knowledge and skills gained in the prosthodontic preclinical course. Patient treatment and understanding allow the student to learn how toDENT 2123 Pain Control I earn patient trust and cooperation. (Department of Prosthodontics)This section is designed to develop understanding and knowledge ofthe various techniques of local anesthesia, landmarks and DENT 3105 Advanced Clinical Operative Dentistryrelationships of the anatomical structures involved, the chemistry and This course teaches the student the practice of operative dentistry onpharmacology of the local anesthetic solutions, pre-anesthetic general clinic patients and includes advanced aspects of operativeevaluation, and the complications and emergencies of local anesthesia dentistry. Clinical skills are developed and improved with amalgam,and their management. An orientation period is given in the clinical direct and indirect composite resin and cast gold restorations. Theaspects of performing all local anesthesia blocks on other students course evaluates competency for all procedures in operative dentistry.following this phase. (Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery) Successful completion of didactic and clinical procedures is required for completion of this course. (Department of Operative Dentistry and Biomaterials) 115
  • 18. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 116DENT 3106 Intermediate Periodontics DENT 3112 Oral Diagnosis III and Treatment Planning IIThis course is a continuation of Introduction to Periodontics. Treatment A comprehensive course in Oral Diagnosis and Treatment Planningmodalities and the biologic basis for various therapeutic procedures including clinical, laboratory and small-group instruction. In the clinicalwill be discussed. The rationale and procedures for management of portion of this course, the student will be required to perform theperiodontal diseases will be presented in detail. The basic objective is necessary diagnostic procedures, including radiographs and laboratoryto provide students with a sound background in all phases of reports, and complete the diagnosis and treatment planning for theperiodontal therapy including assessment of clinical tissue response assigned patients. These patients will have problems of a moreand determination of treatment needs. Clinical experience will include complex nature. The laboratory portion of the course will be spent inthe treating of patients possessing mild-moderate periodontal disease, performing laboratory procedures on patients and interpreting thewhich permits the student to utilize basic nonsurgical and surgical results. (Department of Oral Diagnosis, Medicine and Radiology)procedures emphasized in the didactic material of this course.Emphasis shall be upon initial periodontal therapy and appropriateapplication of treatment modalities in a proper sequence. (Department DENT 3113 Dental Radiology IIIof Periodontics) A comprehensive clinical course in dental radiology. Students will receive supervised experience in taking and processing intra- and extra-oral radiographs. They will also receive instruction on the principles of radiological interpretation and will be required to prepareDENT 3107 Clinical Fixed Prosthodontics reports on assigned patients. (Department of Oral Diagnosis, MedicineThis course will allow the student to gain clinical experience in the and Radiology)discipline of fixed prosthodontics. The student will treat patientsrequiring single crowns and fixed partial dentures. Patient treatmentwill allow the student to apply the knowledge and skills gained in the DENT 3115 Oral Oncologypreclinical courses while closely supervised in a clinical setting. The The objective of this course is to have students gain knowledge aboutrole of fixed prosthodontics, as it relates to other disciplines and total oral care for the oral cancer patient. The student will be presented thepatient care, will be emphasized through detailed treatment plans that requirements of oral care for oral cancer patients by the dentist before,encompass all aspects of restorative dentistry. Close cooperation with during and after oral cancer therapy either by radiation, surgery orthe removable clinical course is required to facilitate the construction of chemotherapy, as well as combinations of these methods. Studentsremovable partial denture abutment crowns. (Department of will be instructed in the management of problems such asProsthodontics) osteoradionecrosis, xerostomia, tooth demineralization (radiation caries), tooth sensitivity, mucositis, edema, necrosis of soft tissue, malnutrition, speech problems, drooling, with special emphasis on prevention. Prosthetic management of the pre-and postsurgical oralDENT 3108 Pediatric Dentistry Clinic cancer patient will be included. The material will be presented duringThis course provides controlled clinical experiences to teach the third- lectures and supplemented by slide presentations. Lecture handoutsyear student the basic diagnostic and technical skills needed to will be used to describe in detail the steps used in construction ofcomprehensive dental treatment and good oral health in children. The appliances. Subject matter includes presurgical aids, prosthesescourse also includes a two-week rotation to Childrens Hospital as well inserted at the time of surgery and postsurgical fabrication, placementas pre-clinical laboratory experiences in pediatric dentistry restorative and adjustment of appliances to correct maxillary, mandibular andtechniques and space maintainer fabrication. (Department of Pediatric extraoral defects. (Department of Prosthodontics)Dentistry) DENT 3116 Oral Medicine and Pharmacology This course will provide instruction in prescription writing along withDENT 3109 Clinical Endodontics diagnosis and therapeutic treatment of oral diseases. Also, the courseIn the patient care clinic, all students will treat pulpally involved anterior will discuss the practical aspects of clinical pharmacology. The majorand posterior teeth. The clinical lectures will supplement the clinical classes of drugs (antibiotics, analgesics, sedatives, etc.) employed byexperiences of the student and emphasize the biologic basis of the practicing dentists will be discussed with the emphasis on correctendodontic practice. (Department of Endodontics) selection, dosage, duration, action and interaction. In addition, the major classes of drugs that a compromised patient may be taking (cardiovascular, endocrine, psychotherapeutic, etc.) will also receiveDENT 3110 Advanced Oral Surgery attention stressing possible interaction with the commonly prescribedThis comprehensive course will cover a broad scope of clinical dental drugs. At least one lecture session will be devoted to thoseproblems that commonly confront the dental practitioner. It will cover drugs somewhat unique in the dental profession, such as fluorides,the diagnosis and surgical management of impacted teeth, topical steroids for mucosal disease and local anesthetics.preprosthetic surgery, benign odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts (Department of Oral Diagnosis, Medicine and Radiology)and tumors of the maxillofacial structures. The principles of biopsy willbe covered as will the diagnosis and medical and surgical DENT 3117 Internal Medicinemanagement of facial infections. Surgical involvement of the maxillary This course presents the basic principles of medicine applied insinus will be discussed. In addition, there will be an orientation in the treating the more common and/or typical diseases of the variousfundamentals of diagnosis and treatment of maxillofacial fractures, systems of the body. Material is presented in a system by systemdisorders of the temporomandibular joint, neurologic pain syndromes approach. Emphasis is generally placed on the understanding of theand dentofacial deformities. (Department of Oral and Maxillofacial various disease processes, and on medical and pharmacologicSurgery) treatment, rather than on diagnosis of disease. Throughout the course, the role of the dentist/physician team is stressed in proper dental medical management of the total patient. (Department of OralDENT 3111 Clinical Orthodontics Diagnosis, Medicine and Radiology)The course will support and apply previous principles and philosophiestaught in preclinical orthodontics. Each student will be required to treattwo or more cases in interceptive or adjunctive orthodontics. The DENT 3118 Introduction to Temporomandibular Jointstudent will treat minor anteroposterior problems, transverse problems Dysfunctionand vertical problems in adult and child patients using fixed or In this course, the anatomy and neurophysiology of the masticatoryremovable appliances, and learn to identify cases that should be system is reviewed. Epidemiology, etiology, differential diagnoses,referred to a specialist. Small-group seminars will introduce and methods of evaluation and methods of treatment of temporomandibularacclimate students to the clinic and the diagnosis and treatment of disorders are presented. (Department of Prosthodontics)minor orthodontic tooth movement procedures. (Department ofOrthodontics) 116
  • 19. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 117DENT 3119 Pain Control IIB DENT 4102 Senior Intermediate PeriodonticsThe purpose of this course is to provide the student with the This course is a continuation of the third year course, Intermediateknowledge of forms of sedation other than nitrous oxide. Oral, nasal, Periodontics, with emphasis on comprehensive periodontalrectal, intramuscular and intravenous sedation are all discussed as management of the students patients. Emphasis is placed onwell as the pharmacology of the medications given during these supportive periodontal therapy and assessment of treatmenttechniques. General anesthesia is also discussed in this course. responses with appropriate modification of periodontal and restorative(Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, General Dentistry and treatment plans. The students will continue to refine their diagnosticPharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and the Department of treatment planning and nonsurgical skills. Students may choose toAnesthesia, Medical Center of New Orleans) perform uncomplicated surgical procedures for mild-moderate periodontitis. (Department of Periodontics)DENT 3120 Clinical Oral SurgeryThis course is designed for students to perform minor oral surgical DENT 4103 Professional Development IVprocedures previously taught in the didactic course, Oral Surgery. It The purpose of this course is to help the young professional to developalso emphasizes the importance of a complete preoperative evaluation a thriving "Fee for Service Practice" while fully realizing that dynamicof the patient as well as the operative and postoperative changes and trends in the delivery of dental services are now and willconsiderations. (Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery) be taking place in the future. The course content will include the following general areas (1) leadership and philosophy (2)DENT 3121 Dental Radiosurgery and Laser Surgery communication and behavioral science (3) financial and businessThis course will discuss the basic principles of dental electrosurgery management (4) marketing and (5) technology. Specifically, suchand its clinical application. Specific emphasis will be placed upon the topics will be addressed as developing a practice philosophy andtypes of electronic currents, equipment, indications and limitations in goals; understanding the contractual arrangements of partnership,the technique. Additionally, research results and the clinical use for associateship, and buy-out agreements; understanding thetissue troughing, recontouring pontic spaces and lengthening clinical components of dental overhead; enhancing interpersonalcrowns will be stressed. The laboratory will provide practical communication skills with patients; appreciating the importance ofexperience in using these techniques on meat. This course will also dental ethics and professionalism; understanding the legaldiscuss the history and basic principles of laser surgery, the clinical ramifications of patient care, implementing effective office systems;and basic research in laser surgery and the clinical application of laser and managing/directing office personnel. (Department of Generalsurgery and case presentations. (Department of Prosthodontics) Dentistry)DENT 3122 Professional Development III DENT 4104 Pain Control IIIThe subject matter addressed in this course is designed to meet the Basic considerations in general anesthesia are presented to introduceneeds of third-year dental students as professional and clinical the student to theories, techniques and principles for the dental patient.caregivers. The main objective is to enhance the student’s competence The routine course of patient treatment, beginning with admission toin response to intrapersonal, interpersonal and social challenges the hospital and pre-operative evaluation, the preparation of the patientinvolved in the delivery of dental care. One component of the course for a general anesthetic, the operation and follow-up care will befocuses on the special issues related to the dental care and treatment presented. This course covers most alternative measures of painof the ever-increasing elderly patient population. Special attention is control including: hypnosis, acupuncture, TENS, newer techniques ingiven to the development of appropriate behavioral skills that focus on local anesthesia and others. (Department of Oral and Maxillofacialthe students’ clinical behavioral resources necessary for working with Surgery)dental patients. Ethical issues that pertain to dental practice as theyrelate to the professional and patients are also discussed. The DENT 4105 Diagnosis and Treatment of Toothache: Aninformation presented in this course is also integrated through selected Endodontic Perspectivecase-based discussion. (Department of General Dentistry) The course will concentrate study of the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of pulpal, referred and periapical pain.DENT 3123 Implants in Dentistry II Correlations between clinical signs, symptoms, and test results will beThis course will expand on the course, Implants in Dentistry I. In this studied in order to predictably and efficiently relieve these types ofcourse the clinical concepts important to assure long term success will odontogenic pain within time restraints of the emergency appointment.be thoroughly discussed. These include but are not limited to treatment The behavioral and psychological aspects of managing the patient withplanning, occlusion, force transfer, maintenance and esthetics. toothache pain will be discussed in relation to practice management.Included in the course are hands-on laboratory sessions using the Difficult diagnostic situations involving fractures of teeth andSimulation Laboratory to familiarize the student with several implant endodontic-periodontal involvement will be presented with appropriatesystems and the use of the various components in clinical practice. treatment methodologies. The latest techniques for diagnosis andThe clinical rotation will complement all aspects of this course. It will repair of perforation will be presented. Drug use and abuse by both theintroduce the students to the different restorative options and patient and dentist will be related to general practice of dentistry.techniques presently used in implant dentistry. It will also provide the (Department of Endodontics)students with a thorough exposure to the different techniques forimplant maintenance. (A multi-disciplinary faculty from the DENT 4106 Rotation in TMJ ClinicDepartments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Periodontics and The fourth-year dental student attends three clinical sessions in theProsthodontics will teach this course.) LSU TMJ Clinic where he/she participates actively in the evaluation and management of temporomandibular disorders. (Department ofDENT 4101 General Practice Prosthodontics)The general dentistry fourth-year program was designed to introducethe students to a general practice model. In this clinical course, the DENT 4107 Rural Practice Rotationstudents should synthesize and apply the theoretical knowledge and Students spend approximately 125 hours in three rural practicetechnical skills that were learned in the three previous years in order to locations, including Lallie Kemp Medical Center in Independence, La.,render comprehensive care to their assigned patients. The fourth year Lafayette Community Health Center in Lafayette, La., and Huey P.experiences are structured to introduce the students to the problems Long Medical Center in Alexandria, La. These experiences provide anencountered in private practice, and furnish them with added excellent opportunity for students to expand their exposure toexperiences in all the disciplines of dentistry. The students also preventive, restorative and oral surgery experiences in a rural clinicparticipate in study clubs as part of the fourth year curriculum. The environment. The course is designed to introduce students to thestudy clubs are designed to provide experience in critical literature provision of health care services in Louisiana communities withreview and case presentation. (Department of General Dentistry) underserved, high need populations. (Department of General Dentistry) 117
  • 20. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 118DENT 4108 Advanced Treatment Planning Seminar BACHELOR OF SCIENCEThe purpose of this course is to expand student thinking in the arena oftreatment planning; to change his/her focus from a "requirementmindset," what L.D. Pankey describes as a "tooth dentist" to a mindset Admissions Regulations For Both The LSUthat takes into consideration the overall oral health and perceived Health Sciences Center School of Dentistryneeds/desires of the patient, what Pankey describes as a "wholeperson" dentist. The course explores important questions/issues And The University of Louisiana Lafayetterelated to "advanced" clinical areas of dentistry such as esthetics, Dental Hygiene Programsimplants, use of attachments, occlusal rehabilitation, and the treatmentof patients with compromised general health. The last part of the Students are enrolled once a year for the Fall semester. Thecourse will be solely devoted to the presentation/discussion of complex following are the admission requirements:cases. (Department of General Dentistry) 1. After October 1 of the year prior to anticipated admission,DENT 4109 Extramural Community Dentistry request an application from the Office of Admissions, LSUThis course is designed to give students experience in providing School of Dentistry, 1100 Florida Avenue, New Orleans, La.instruction in oral health education to population groups not normally 70119-2799.encountered in the School patient population. Students will participatein the Tobacco Cessation Rotation in the third year. In addition, 2. The application must be submitted to the School of Dentistrystudents will participate in the following areas: a visit to an elementary not later than March 15 of the year admission is sought.school providing oral health education to students; a visit giving oralhealth care instruction to caregivers of nursing home patients in a 3. An official transcript from each college or university attendednursing home environment; and a visit observing at LSU Head and must be sent by the registrar of each institution directly to theNeck Tumor Board. (Department of General Dentistry) Office of Admissions, LSU School of Dentistry, 1100 Florida Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70119-2799.PROGRAMS IN DENTAL 4. A recent passport-type photograph, full-face view, must accompany the admission form.HYGIENE 5. A personal interview with the Dental Hygiene AdmissionsNOTE: The following information on the LSUSD programs in dental Committee is required.hygiene pertains to those programs only. Students enrolled in theDental Hygiene Program are bound by the same rules and regulations 6. One confidential recommendation on the form provided,that apply to other students of the LSUSD, and that are in this submitted directly to the Office of Admissions, by one of thecatalog/bulletin. applicants instructors. The LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry provides a 7. An official copy of the candidates American College TestingBachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene degree at two campuses. The (ACT) scores is required.main campus is in New Orleans at the LSUHSC School of Dentistry(LSUHSC-SD), and all didactic and clinical course work occurs at theLSUHSC-SD. The second campus is in Lafayette, Louisiana Bachelor Of Science Degree(ULL/LSUHSC-SD). This program was established in 1999 as anextension of the LSUHSC-SD curriculum, and offers a joint degree In order to earn a Bachelor of Science degree, the following 61between LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans and the University credit hours of general studies courses are required.of Louisiana, Lafayette. For the extension program, the majority of thelecture courses are transmitted from LSUHSC-SD to ULL/LSUHSC-SD, utilizing distance learning technology. All didactic and clinical Semestercourse work occurs at the Lafayette Community Health Care Center in General Study Courses HoursLafayette, Louisiana. English Composition ---------------- 6 Literature ------------------------- 3 (200 level or higher)ADMISSION AND REGULATIONS Math ------------------------------- 6 (College level Algebra and 1. Admission to the program is by competitive application. Trigonometry) 2. Admission to the Bachelor of Science degree program will be limited to Louisiana residents. Chemistry -------------------------- 6 3. Attainment of an acceptable quality point average will be Sociology -------------------------- 3 stressed. Speech ----------------------------- 3 4. Prior to enrollment at the LSU School of Dentistry students Psychology ------------------------- 3 will be required to submit to a variety of medical tests Computer Literacy ------------------ 3 including serologic tests for hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis Biological Sciences * -------------- 13 C virus, (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). (12 hours must be lecture) Section 1207 of the State Board of Dentistry Regulations Fine Arts -------------------------- 3 and LSA-R.S. 37:751D require "self-reporting" of (music, dance, art or theatre) seropositivity for these viruses. In such cases the Board of Humanities ** ---------------------- 9 Dentistry may restrict or prohibit seropositive individuals from practicing dentistry or dental hygiene, including participation Academic Electives *** ------------- 3 in programs at the School of Dentistry. In accordance with these provisions, it will be necessary for a student in the Total 61 dental and dental hygiene programs to demonstrate seronegativity for HBV, HCV, and HIV prior to enrollment. 5. If a student is not accepted for a program, a new application and related material must be submitted each year in which consideration for admission is desired. 118
  • 21. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 119 The Bachelor of Science Degree will be awarded upon completion DEGREES WITH HONORSof the above 61 required credit hours and the additional 64 dentalhygiene credit hours for a total of 125 semester hours. For enrollment Baccalaureate degrees are awarded summa cum laude to studentsin the Program at LSUSD, the 61 general studies credit hours may be whose quality point average falls within the range of 3.960-4.000,taken at any accredited institution prior to enrollment. For enrollment in magna cum laude to students whose quality point average falls withinthe program at ULLafayette, of the 61 required credit hours, a the range of 3.860 to 3.959, and cum laude to students whose qualityminimum of 3 credit hours must be taken at ULLafayette prior to point average falls within the range 3.760 to 3.859. Scholastic honorsenrollment. Contact the LSUSD Dental Hygiene Program at 504-619- are based on the overall quality point average for all course work8530 to get information on prerequisites. attempted in pursuing the degree.* Preferred Biological courses are General Biology, Zoology, Anatomy& Physiology, and Microbiology. FOUR DIGIT COURSE NUMBERING** Humanity courses should be chosen from the following: history, SYSTEMspeech, literature, philosophy, religion, foreign language at or abovethe sophomore level. In addition, at least 3 credits of Humanities must An explanation of the four digit course numbering system is as follows:be at or above the sophomore level. The first digit represents the year; the second digit represents the*** Academic electives may be anything except Physical Education semester; the third digit represents the program (4 = Dental Hygiene);(recommendations are Nutrition, Speech, Psychology). and the fourth digit represents the sequencing of courses. DENTAL HYGIENE DENTAL HYGIENE FIRST YEAR CURRICULUM SECOND YEAR CURRICULUMFIRST SEMESTER FIRST SEMESTERBasic Science Course Hours Basic Science Courses HoursDH 3141 Gross Anatomy ------------------------ 2 DH 4141 Pharmacology ------------------------ 2 DH 4141 General and Oral Pathology I -------- 2Clinical Science Courses Clinical Science CoursesDH 3141 Morphology and Occlusion ------------- 2 DH 4141 Clinical Nutrition ------------------ 2DH 3141 Fundamentals of Dental Radiology ----- 2 DH 4141 Periodontics ------------------------ 2DH 3141 Oral Diagnosis ----------------------- 1 DH 4143 Intermediate Clinic ----------------- 3DH 3141 Pre-Clinic Dental Hygiene ------------ 4 DH 4141 Pain Control II --------------------- 2DH 3141 Infectious Disease Control ----------- 1 DH 4141 Dental Materials -------------------- 2DH 3141 Introductory Dental Assisting -------- 1 DH 4141 Internal Medicine for Local Anesthesia 1DH 3141 Professional Development I ----------- 2 DH 4141 Statistical Evaluation of DentalCPR ------------------------------------------ 0 Literature I ------------------------ 1 CPR ----------------------------------------- 0SECOND SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTERBasic Science Courses Basic Science CourseDH 3241 Microbiology ------------------------- 3 DH 4242 General and Oral Pathology II ------- 1DH 3241 General and Oral Physiology ---------- 2DH 3241 Histology ---------------------------- 3 Clinical Science Courses DH 4241 Practice Management ----------------- 2Clinical Science Courses DH 4241 Interdisciplinary Principles forDH 3241 Preventive Dentistry ----------------- 2 Dental Hygiene Practice ------------- 2DH 3242 Introductory Clinic ------------------ 3 DH 4241 Community Dentistry and Public HealthDH 3242 Radiographic Interpretation ---------- 1 Mechanisms -------------------------- 2DH 3242 Professional Development II ---------- 2 DH 4244 Advanced Clinic --------------------- 4DH 3241 Pain Control I ----------------------- 1 DH 4241 Advanced Clinic Seminars ------------ 2 DH 4241 Statistical Evaluation of Dental Literature II ----------------------- 2TOTAL for First Year Dental Hygiene ---------- 32 TOTAL for Second Year Dental Hygiene -------- 32 119
  • 22. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 120COURSE DESCRIPTIONS DH 3241 Microbiology Introduction to the basic principles of bacteriology, mycology, virology and immunology with special emphasis on how they relate to theDH 3141 Gross Anatomy microbial flora of the oral cavity and to oral disease. Methods ofA lecture course to orient the student toward an understanding of the sterilization and disinfection are stressed along with their application toanatomical make-up and integral relationships of the human body and the prevention of cross contamination in the dental office.its parts. Particular emphasis is placed on head and neck anatomy. Asystematic study is followed by a regional approach to each of thebody areas so that the systems are studied in relation to one another. DH 3241 General and Oral Physiology An introductory course that presents a general survey of the basic physiological principles underlying the function of the different organDH 3141 Morphology and Occlusion systems of the human body, including the central and peripheralA lecture and laboratory course involving a detailed study of the nervous system, neuromuscular, endocrine, cardiovascular,anatomy of the teeth, individually and collectively. Information about respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal systems. The influence of eachthe anatomical and embryonic differences between individual teeth, of these systems on the oral cavity is presented as a separate group ofdevelopmental disturbances involving the teeth, root structure lectures. Lectures are supplemented by slides and videotapedanomalies, the physiology of mandibular movement, and an demonstrations.introduction to occlusion are integral parts of the course. Students gainlaboratory exposure to the individual teeth through wax carvings of theentire tooth. DH 3241 Histology An introductory course designed to provide the student with an understanding of the microscopic anatomy of the human body.DH 3141 Fundamentals of Dental Radiology Functional topics and embryological development are integrated withAn introductory course in dental radiology which includes didactic histology in the lectures. The course is roughly divided into thirds. Theinstruction in radiation physics, radiation biology, radiation hygiene, first third of the course is devoted to the study of cell biology and theand radiographic and processing techniques. This course also includes organization of basic tissues. The second portion deals with histologyan introduction to the radiological interpretation of normal anatomy, of selected systems. The final third is concerned with detailedcaries, periodontal disease and periapical disease. The student development and histology of the oral cavity and teeth. Lectures arereceives supervision in taking and processing intra- and extra oral supplemented with photographic slides to enhance the students’radiographs on mannequins, as well as patients. Specific requirements appreciation of microscopic anatomy.on occlusal, panorex, and complete series of X-rays must be met.DH 3141 Oral Diagnosis DH 3241 Preventive Dentistry An introductory course that presents the etiology and steps in theAn introductory course in diagnosis of normal and pathological prevention of dental diseases. Philosophies of primary, secondary andconditions of the oral cavity using didactic and clinical instruction. The tertiary prevention are discussed. The development and maintenancecourse includes patient medical history, normal anatomy, general of dental disease programs are addressed as they relate toappraisal, soft tissue examination, charting procedures and the use of communicating with, educating and motivating patients.appropriate laboratory techniques and other diagnostic aids. Theclinical aspect utilizes the application of diagnostic techniques as theyapply individually and to each other. DH 3242 Introductory Clinic A clinical course that applies techniques, procedures and information presented in Pre-Clinic. The course consists of the clinical treatment ofDH 3141 Pre-Clinical Dental Hygiene patients for prophylaxis, in varying degrees of difficulty; completeA lecture and laboratory course dealing with the fundamentals series of X-rays, fluoride treatments, and oral health instruction. Thenecessary in preparation for the clinical experience in dental hygiene. course is supplemented by scheduled seminars on root planing,Information on the dental/dental hygiene profession, prophylaxis special patients, use of power scalers, auxiliary health aids, andtechniques, clinical procedure, patient management, and oral health laboratory diagnostic tests used in dental practice.education is an integral part of the course. Experience that can beapplied to the oral cavity is obtained through instrumentationprocedures on mannequins. DH 3242 Radiographic Interpretation A comprehensive course in radiographic interpretation of normal anatomy, anomalies, caries, periapical lesions, periodontal disease,DH 3141 Infectious Disease Control cysts, trauma and various pathological lesions of the jaws andAn introductory course which provides instruction in blood-borne associated structures.infections such as AIDS and Hepatitis. The epidemiology andprevention of these diseases, and a complete infection control policy ispresented in order that the student may function properly in a dental DH 3242 Professional Development IIsetting. Federal, state, OSHA and LSUHSC policies concerning legal A course which consists of communication concepts and skills, andissues are discussed. includes exercises in practical application with the dental patient. The student is made aware of the various barriers to successful communication by exposure to concepts of culture, verbal and non-DH 3141 Introductory Dental Assisting verbal language, and group dynamics.An introductory course to introduce four-handed dentistry procedures.Lectures and a pre-clinical orientation is given to impart knowledge inassisting the dentist in routine operative procedures. The student DH 3241 Pain Control Iidentifies and prepares materials, instruments and equipment for An introductory course to make the student aware of and becomedental practice. proficient in the prevention, recognition, and treatment of medical emergencies occurring during dental treatment. The importance of the medical history review prior to dental treatment and the recognition ofDH 3141 Professional Development I the clinical signs of impending emergencies are stressed.An introductory course designed to introduce the role of the student asa member of the LSU School of Dentistry and the dental hygieneprogram. This lecture/seminar course introduces the philosophical DH 4141 Pharmacologyconcepts of ethics and moral reasoning. Human behavior principles This course consists of a series of lectures, conferences, andare shared which create an awareness of the issues presented by a demonstrations emphasizing the pharmaco-dynamics of drug action.culturally diverse student/faculty/patient population. This includes modes of administration, mechanisms of action, biotransformation, excretion, drug interactions, and side effects. Special considerations are given to those drugs relevant to the practice of dentistry. 120
  • 23. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 121DH 4141 General and Oral Pathology I DH 4241 Practice ManagementThis course educates students regarding the pathologic basis for A lecture course in dental office management. Emphasis is on the usesystemic and oral disease. It includes a consideration of basic of recall systems, scheduling of patients, bookkeeping procedures,principles of pathology as well as specific disease processes. The maintaining the appointment book, ordering supplies and equipment,definition, epidemiology, distribution, morphology, symptoms, etiology, and studying state laws and ethics. An integral part of the coursetreatment, and prognosis of each disease process is studied. includes principles of human behavior affecting the dental hygienist’s relationship with co-workers and patients, the influence of personalityDH 4141 Clinical Nutrition types on interpersonal relations, motivation of patients to proper oralThis course consists of techniques for diet assessment, nutritional health, and preparation for job interviews.counseling and patient management. It is designed to increase thestudents skill in developing a comprehensive disease program to treat DH 4241 Interdisciplinary Principles for Dental Hygieneindividual patients. There is a combination of lectures, presentation of Practiceabstracts, and discussion of current nutritional issues. This course integrates the various disciplines taught in the dental hygiene curriculum. It consists of guest lecturers and case-basedDH 4141 Periodontics exercises.A fundamental lecture course in periodontics with emphasis on a basicunderstanding of the normal and diseased states of the periodontium. DH 4241 Introduction to Community Dentistry and PublicAn orientation to the concepts of periodontal examination, charting, Health Mechanismsdiagnosis, treatment planning, root planing, soft tissue curettage, and This course focuses on the role of the practicing hygienist in the healthother surgical therapeutic techniques is presented. ecology of the United States, exploring social issues, consumerism, legislation, alternative systems of health care and other issues. TheDH 4143 Intermediate Clinic students are afforded the opportunity for a wide variety of extramuralThis is a continuation of clinical treatment of patients from Introductory experiences, both observation and participation. The students learn theClinic with the addition of impressions, study casts, root planing, and principles of basic public health mechanisms of epidemiology, diseaselimited local anesthesia experiences. Scheduled seminars are held to measurement, including dental indices, and public health programreview clinical procedures. Students are assigned to selected planning.departments within the school as well as extramural clinics forobservation and participation. DH 4244 Advanced Clinic A continuation of clinical treatment from Intermediate Clinic with theDH 4141 Pain Control II additional application of duties including sulcular irrigation, dietA lecture course designed to develop an understanding and knowledge analysis, and pit and fissure sealants. Students have specific localof the various techniques of local anesthesia. The course includes the anesthesia requirements. Students are assigned to selectedlandmarks and relationships of the anatomical structures involved, the departments within the school, as well as extramural clinics forchemistry and pharmacology of the local anesthetic solutions, pre- observation and participation.anesthetic evaluation, and the management of complications andemergencies of local anesthesia. A laboratory/clinical session follows DH 4241 Advanced Clinic Seminarsthe didactic phase. Competence in administering local anesthesia is This course incorporates the literature with the didactic and clinicalevaluated in the Intermediate and Advanced Dental Hygiene Clinical applications of dental hygiene care. It promotes the studentscourses. understanding of the latest trends and newest technologies in comprehensive dental care.DH 4141 Dental MaterialsThis course provides a working knowledge of metallurgy, ceramics and DH 4241 Statistical Evaluation of Dental Literature IIpolymer science. Specific restorative and dental laboratory products This course offers a review of current dental hygiene and periodontalare presented and their proper manipulation is described. Laboratory literature to provide the basis for understanding current philosophies ofsessions involve experience in handling these materials. theory.DH 4141 Internal Medicine for Local AnesthesiaThis course presents basic principles of medicine as they relate to ADDITIONAL EXPENSESpatients receiving local anesthesia for dental treatment. Emphasis ison understanding disease processes and medical or pharmacologic 1. Equipment and Instrument Rental Feetreatment of the diseases, rather than on diagnosis of disease. Dental (yearly) $345.treatment concerns and anesthesia modifications for patients with 2. Uniform costs per year (approximately) $175.diseases such as hypertension, asthma, cardiac disease, pulmonary 3. Supplies and instruments (approximately) $1000(first year);disease, diabetes, liver disease, arthritis, and end stage renal disease $250 (second year).are covered. The interrelationship of medicine and dentistry is 4. Books (approximately) $790(first year); $450(second year).stressed. 5. National and State Board Examinations (second year) $450.DH 4141 Statistical Evaluation of Dental Literature IThis course provides guided direction and practice in reading andinterpreting dental literature to enable the student to critically evaluatethe reported findings of research studies. It introduces scientificmethodology and the use of its attendant statistics, i. e., sampleselection, measures of central tendency, measures of variation, testsof significance and correlation coefficients.DH 4242 General and Oral Pathology IIThis course is a continuation of the first semester pathology course.During this semester particular emphasis is placed on a review of oraland head and neck pathology. 121
  • 24. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 122 an institution of the student’s choosing prior to or concurrently with thePROGRAMS IN DENTAL DLT course work at LSUSD. All subjects in general education must be taken at an institution whose credits are transferable to the LSULABORATORY TECHNOLOGY system.GENERAL Although applications will be accepted from students who have completed only high school and are acceptable for college level work, preference will be given to those students who have completed some The programs lead to employment as a dental laboratory or all of their general education requirements.technician. They are designed to prepare the student to function as atechnician whose laboratory responsibilities would include constructionof either removable appliances, such as partial or complete dentures, ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREEor fixed restorations such as crowns, bridges, and porcelain veneers.The Bachelor of Science Degree program gives the student further The Associate of Science Degree will be awarded upon completionpreparation for careers in public health institutions, technical education, of the above 21 credit hours and the additional 54 dental laboratorylaboratory management, and sales. credit hours for a total of 75 semester hours. The Associate of Science Degree Program is designed to give those students who may wish to The School provides two dental laboratory technology programs: the continue for a Bachelor of Science Degree an opportunity to do so.Associate of Science Degree in Dental Laboratory Technology and theBachelor of Science Degree in Dental Laboratory Technology. Semester Required Courses Hours The following information concerns the programs in dental English Composition -------------------- 6laboratory technology offered by the School and pertains to those Mathematics ---------------------------- 6programs only. Students enrolled in dental laboratory technology will (No lower then College level algebra)be bound, however, by the same rules and regulations that apply to Inorganic Chemistry -------------------- 3other students of the School, and that are found elsewhere in this (Lecture)catalog/bulletin. Sociology ------------------------------ 3 Humanities ----------------------------- 3 Total ---------------------------------- 21ADMISSIONS AND REGULATIONS 1. Admission to the program is by competitive application. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 2. Attainment of an acceptable quality point average in the All candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree must be required subjects is stressed. graduates of an accredited associate degree program in dental laboratory technology and complete the required 45 hours of general 3. If a student is not accepted for a program, a new application studies credits and additional advanced technical subjects. and related materials must be submitted each year in which admission consideration is desired. Semester Required Courses Hours Students are enrolled once a year. The following are the admission English Composition -------------------- 6guidelines: English Literature --------------------- 3 Mathematics ---------------------------- 6 1. After October 1 of the year prior to anticipated entrance, (No lower then College level algebra) request an application from the Office of Admissions, LSU Inorganic Chemistry -------------------- 3 School of Dentistry, 1100 Florida Avenue, New Orleans, LA (Lecture) 70119-2799. Business Administration or Economics --- 6 Arts ----------------------------------- 3 2. The application must be submitted to the School no later (Music, Art, Dance, or Theater) than March 31 of the year admission is sought. Natural Science ------------------------ 6 (Biology, zoology, or botany) 3. An official transcript from each college or university attended (In a two semester sequence) must be sent by the registrar of each institution directly to the Psychology ----------------------------- 3 Office of Admissions, LSU School of Dentistry, 1100 Florida History -------------------------------- 3 Sociology ------------------------------ 3 Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70119-2799. Humanities ----------------------------- 3 (English, Literature, History, Speech, 4. A recent passport-type photograph, full face view, must Philosophy, or Foreign Language) accompany the application form. Total -------------------------------- 45 5. A personal interview with the Dental Laboratory Technology Admissions Committee is required. The Bachelor of Science degree will be awarded upon the completion of the required general studies and additional advanced 6. One confidential recommendation on the form provided, technical subjects. The degree requires a total of 135 hours. submitted directly to the Office of Admissions, by one of the applicant’s previous instructors or teachers. A candidate for the Bachelor of Science degree who has earned 21 hours of general studies and 54 hours of technical studies for theMINIMUM REQUIREMENTS associate degree will therefore have only 24 hours of general studies and 36 hours of third year advanced technical training remaining. Careful consideration will be given to those applicants who presentevidence of preparation and achievement. For the Associate degree Candidates who receive their associate degree from otherprogram, 21 college-level general education credit hours are required accredited programs should examine the above list of requirements forand for the Bachelor program 45 college-level general education credit general studies.hours are required. These general education credit hours are inaddition to the curriculum in technology at LSUSD and may be taken at 122
  • 25. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 123DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONSSUBJECTS , FOUR DIGIT COURSE 2121 Dental MorphologyNUMBERING SYSTEM This course is designed to teach the student tooth anatomy along with some relationship to oral anatomy. The course introduces the studentAn explanation of the four digit course numbering system is as follows: to dental language and terminology. This is a technical science that requires carving and wax build-up techniques. The student is taught § The first digit represents the year; the value of tooth anatomy as applied to good esthetics and function in § The second digit represents the semester; dental restoration. § The third digit represents the program 2 = Dental Laboratory Technology, 2121 Fixed Prosthodontics I 3 = Advanced Dental Laboratory Technology; The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with various § The fourth represents the sequencing of courses. requirements for restoring lost tooth structures in the laboratory, using techniques and materials as prescribed by the dentist. The dental technician must be able to understand the use of dies and casts in fixed procedures. The student must be able to reproduce lost DENTAL LABORATORY structures and fabricate a finished product using metals and plastics. FIRST YEAR CURRICULUM This course will employ a combination of both lecture and laboratory sessions aimed at providing the student with skills needed to operate (Courses are listed in the sequence as taken in the curriculum) effectively in this vital area of dental technology. Semester 2121 Fundamentals of Occlusion IFirst Semester Hours This lecture laboratory course is designed to provide the student aDLT 2121 Dental Morphology ------------------- 4 comprehensive study of theory and practice in occlusal rehabilitation. ADLT 2121 Fixed Prosthodontics ---------------- 2 primary concern of the dental technologist is the restoration of theDLT 2121 Fundamental of Dental Laboratory occlusal surfaces of teeth of opposing arches together in such a Technology -------------------------- 2 manner that they still function to preserve the health of the masticatoryDLT 2121 Fundamentals of Occlusion I --------- 3 system. The student will study the dynamics of mandibular movementDLT 2121 Infectious Disease Control ---------- 1 and its effect on tooth form. Principles of articulation andGeneral Studies* ----------------------------- 6 instrumentation will be presented to enable the student to simulate mandibular movements on an articulator. Occlusal restorations will beSecond Semester fabricated in wax on a semiadjustable articulator, according toDLT 2221 Dental Ceramics I ------------------- 1 functional criteria.DLT 2221 Complete Dentures I ----------------- 3DLT 2222 Fixed Prosthodontics II ------------- 3 2121 Fundamentals of Dental Laboratory TechnologyDLT 2221 Removable Partial Dentures I -------- 3 This course is designed to give the first-year student the early steps inDLT 2222 Concepts of Occlusion II ------------ 2 laboratory procedures. The student will learn model pouring, customGeneral Studies* ----------------------------- 6 tray making, occlusion rims, mounting the articulators, all leading to setting teeth. This course has both lecture and laboratory and isYear Total ----------------------------------- 36 planned to lead the student into the second semester of denture construction.* Up to a maximum of 6 semester hours of generalstudies may be taken. 2121 Infectious Disease Control This is an introductory course providing instructions in blood-borne infections - AIDS and Hepatitis. The epidemiology and prevention of these diseases are presented, and a complete infection control policy is presented and discussed in order that the student may function DENTAL LABORATORY properly in a dental setting. Federal, state, OSHA and Medical Center SECOND YEAR CURRICULUM policy concerning legal issues will also be discussed. (NOTE: Not less than 15 general studies hours must be completed prior to matriculation into the second year curriculum.) 2221 Dental Ceramics I The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with procedures Semester and techniques used in restoring lost tooth structures with ceramicFirst Semester Hours materials. Fundamentals of ceramic materials will be taught by lecture and laboratory sessions.DLT 3122 Advanced Removable Prosthodontics - 2DLT 3121 Professional Ethics ----------------- 1DLT 3122 Dental Ceramics II ------------------ 1 2221 Complete Dentures IDLT 3121 Orthodontic Laboratory -------------- 2 The aim of this course is to teach students the fundamental skills ofDLT 3121 Applied Laboratory Techniques I ----- 4 fabricating complete dentures for the edentulous patient. The dentalDLT 3121 Dental Materials Science I ---------- 2 technician must have an understanding of the biological andGeneral Studies* ----------------------------- 6 mechanical factors involved in denture construction for the edentulous patient so that the student can better communicate with and serve the needs of the dentist.Second SemesterDLT 3222 Applied Laboratory Techniques II ---- 15DLT 3221 Professional Development ------------ 1 2222 Fixed Prosthodontics IIDLT 3221 Laboratory Management --------------- 2 This course is designed to further enhance the students’ knowledge and hand skills by fabricating multi-unit fixed restorations according toYear Total ------------------------------------ 36 work authorization specification. Each class will consist of a lecture and laboratory session through which fixed prosthodontics theory and practice will provide the student with the skills necessary to produce clinically acceptable appliances. 123
  • 26. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 1242221 Removable Partial Dentures I manipulation and do not emphasize technique. Coordination is madeThis course is designed to provide the student with intensive study and with the physics, chemistry and scientific measurements.training in the fabrication of removable partial dentures. The dentallaboratory technician must have a thorough understanding of the 3221 Professional Developmentvarying approaches of surveying and framework design to be utilized The purpose of this course is to give the student a broad view of theby dentists. The course employs a combination of lecture and dental profession as it is related to the technician. Guest speakers inlaboratory sessions in order to provide the student with skills he will various specialties will be meeting with the class, and seminarneed to operate in this vital area. sessions will be used to discuss viewpoints in dentistry. Some periods will be used to review technology subjects in preparation for board2222 Concepts of Occlusion II examinations.This is an advanced course designed as a continuation ofFundamentals of Occlusion I. Three additional theories of occlusal 3221 Laboratory Managementrehabilitation will be presented. The student will study the functional This course is a combination of laboratory accounting principles andrelations of the temporomandibular joint, the panograph, and the management based upon the manual of the National Association ofgrowth of the maxilla and mandible. Occlusal restorations will be Dental Laboratories. This course involves both lecture and workshopfabricated in wax on a semi-adjustable articulator, according to the and introduces a system of business management for both small andorganic theory of occlusion. large laboratories.3122 Advanced Removable ProsthodonticsThis course is designed to give the student further instruction in ADVANCED DENTAL LABORATORYremovable prosthodontics. The basic plan of the course is to divide thelecture and laboratory materials into three major divisions. One part will TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUMdeal with additional instruction in removable partial design. A secondpart will be additional instruction in complete dentures. The third Semesterdivision will give the student an introduction to Maxillofacial prosthesis. First Semester HoursThe student will receive both lecture and laboratory learningexperiences. DLT 4133 Advanced Ceramics ------------------- 1 DLT 4133 Complete Dentures 2 ----------------- 13121 Professional Ethics DLT 4133 Advanced Fixed Prosthodontics ------- 1The purpose of this course is to introduce the prospective dental DLT 4133 Removable Partial Dentures 2 -------- 1technician to the legal and ethical aspects of the profession of dentistry DLT 4131 Technical Methods ------------------- 7and dental technology. Its main focus will be on the professional DLT 4132 Dental Materials Science 2 ---------- 1relationship between the dental technician and the dentist. As one of General Studies* ----------------------------- 6the important links in the process of providing total dental care to everypatient, the dental technician must be aware of their responsibility inassuring that the ethical standards of the fields of dentistry and dental Second Semestertechnology are maintained. DLT 4231 Laboratory Assignments -------------- 153122 Dental Ceramics II DLT 4231 Elective Procedures ---------------- 3This course is a continuation of Dental Ceramics. The student willstudy advanced principles of restoring lost tooth structure with Year Total ----------------------------------- 36porcelain materials. Laboratory exercises include the fabrication ofmultiunit porcelain fused to metal bridges, individualizedcharacterization and staining, and porcelain veneers. Students areencouraged to pursue individual interests in the ceramic arts.3121 Orthodontic Laboratory COURSE DESCRIPTIONSThis course is designed to teach students how to construct basicorthodontic appliances. Five orthodontic appliances are fabricated with 4133 Advanced Ceramicsheavy emphasis on wire bending. Lectures are geared to This course is designed to offer further instruction to the candidate forunderstanding the orthodontic classification system, orthodontic the Bachelor of Science degree beyond that which is provided in theterminology, work authorizations, and purposes of the appliances. Associate Degree Program. The course involves proceduresFinally, the student is exposed to fixed, banded, edged wise cases and performed in the student laboratory including all ceramic crowns.surgical orthodontic cases. Anterior and posterior porcelain fused to metal restorations with intracornal and extracornal attachments. Selected reading will enhance3121 and 3222 Applied Laboratory Techniques I and II the techniques performed in the laboratory.This internship is designed to provide the student with appliedexperiences in all phases of laboratory procedure. More specifically, 4133 Complete Dentures IIthe internship is so arranged that the student will gain experience in all This course is designed to give the baccalaureate degree candidateareas of basic laboratory work, including fixed prosthodontics, advanced experiences in complete denture techniques. Designedcomplete dentures, as well as advanced laboratory work (Maxillofacial around an independent study/seminar format, the student will have anprosthesis, ceramics). To reinforce and extend the learning previously opportunity to process an implant retained denture and complete theacquired in the program, small group seminars will be held periodically. partial denture started in removable partial denture 2. In addition, the seminar will be used to present and discuss denture topics chosen by the course director.3121 Dental Materials Science IMaterials science fundamentals, based upon metallurgy, ceramics,polymer science and surface interactions are presented as background 4133 Advanced Fixed Prosthodonticsfor specific product discussions. Emphasis is placed upon laboratory This course provides the bachelor of science degree candidate withprocesses, such as precious and non-precious metal fabrication, advanced experiences in fixed prosthodontics. During the laboratoryporcelain manipulation, denture base polymer curing, and the proper course the students will fabricate fixed bridges with non rigidhandling of gypsum products. Time will also be spent on other connectors, crowns as partial denture abutments, substructures forrestorative materials of interest to the dentist and the technician. ERA attachments, and an implant substructure. These practicalLaboratory sessions provide experience in materials handling and exercises will be enhanced with technical readings. 124
  • 27. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 1254133 Removable Partial Dentures IIThis course is designed for advanced experiences in the design and MASTER OF SCIENCE INconstruction of removable partial dentures beyond those provided inthe Associate Degree Program. In seminars the student will increase ORAL BIOLOGYability in removable partial denture design and construction, completepartial dentures using various attachments, and read selected LSU Health Sciences Center School oftechnical publications. Dentistry and the LSU Health Sciences4131 Technical Methods Center School of Graduate Studies inThis course is designed to provide the baccalaureate degree candidate New Orleanswith additional practical laboratory experience working on actualpatient cases. The student will be assigned space in the student This program allows students already enrolled in an advancedlaboratory in which to complete cases assigned from the Senior Dental dental education program as well as individuals who have aStudent Clinic, Graduate Prosthodontics Student Clinic, and the specialized interest in dentistry or the allied dental sciences to earn thesupport laboratories within the School. Each case will be completed degree, Master of Science in Oral Biology. This program is offeredunder the guidance of a dental laboratory technology faculty advisor through the LSU Health Sciences Center School of Graduate Studiesfrom the specialty area the student chooses. in New Orleans and administered by the LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry and the Center of Excellence in Oral and4132 Dental Materials Science II Craniofacial Biology.This is a course offered by the Department of Biomaterials. The courseincludes seminars and lectures on advanced dental materials topics. The Master of Science Program in Oral Biology is an option for students with superior academic records and research potential. The criteria for admission to the LSU Health Sciences Center School of4231. Laboratory Assignments Graduate Studies must be met. A minimum score of 1,000 on theThis course is an extension of Technique Methods and serves as an Graduate Record Examination (combined verbal and quantitative) isadded opportunity for the baccalaureate degree candidates to sharpen required. Students must have earned a Bachelor of Science degree,skills in their chosen specialty area under the guidance of dental D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree, or equivalent, from an accredited program.laboratory technology faculty. In addition, students will have anopportunity to rotate through the dental school service laboratories to The program can be tailored to the requirement of individualpursue advanced work in their specialty area. students. The thesis committee will be comprised of three graduate faculty of the Center of Excellence in Oral and Craniofacial Biology,4231 Elective Procedures and at least one must be from a Basic Science department. CurriculumElective laboratory time is given the baccalaureate degree student to design and course selection must be approved by the studentsallow added pursuit of the chosen specialty area. The student may committee using the following guidelines. The minimum requirement ischoose to spend additional time in a personal interest area, at a 33 semester hours of graduate work to include:rotation site or pursuing a practical project, table clinic, businessmanagement module or other designed programs. The elective will be Creditsdesigned and coordinated by the student under the guidance of the Advanced Dental Core Course Requirements -- 9student’s faculty advisor. Basic Science Courses Minimum Requirements 9ADDITIONAL EXPENSES Advanced Dental Education Specialty Courses Minimum Requirements -------------- 9 § Uniform $ 85 § Instruments (2 years) $450 Thesis Research Requirements -------------- 6 § Books (2 years) $300 § Equipment and Instrument Rental Fee (yearly) $100 Minimum Total ----------------------------- 33 Core Course and Advanced Education Specialty Course details can be found on pages 121 – 122. ADVANCED EDUCATION AND RESIDENCY PROGRAMS Advanced education programs for specialty training in the areas of Endodontics, Orthodontics, Pediatric Dentistry, Periodontics and Prosthodontics meet the accreditation requirements of the Council on Dental Education of the American Dental Association and the eligibility requirements of the respective specialty boards. Candidates seeking admission to these programs must hold a D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree or the foreign equivalent, and students who complete the requirements of the program are awarded a certificate of proficiency. Residency and advanced education programs in General Dentistry and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery also meet the accreditation requirements of the Council on Dental Education of the American Dental Association. The residency program in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery satisfies the requirements of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and the American Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. 125
  • 28. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 126 Students enrolled in advanced education programs are bound by GENERAL DENTISTRYthe same rules and regulations that apply to other students of theSchool of Dentistry, and they may be found elsewhere in this (PRACTICE RESIDENCY)catalog/bulletin. More detailed information on each of the programsfollows. Inquiries should be directed to Assistant Dean for Advanced The Program in General Dentistry at the LSU Health SciencesEducation. Center School of Dentistry and the Medical Center of Louisiana at New Orleans (MCLNO) is a two-year hospital-based residency, which offers an unique opportunity for an advanced clinical and didactic experience in a university hospital environment, with additional training in the artsENDODONTICS and sciences basic to a general dental practice. The objectives of the program are to educate dentists to function as a part of a hospital team The Program in Endodontics is designed to give advanced and to gain competency in diagnosing and rendering comprehensiveeducation to an individual committed to the practice, teaching, or and preventive dental treatment for the medically compromised patient.research of endodontics. Upon satisfactory completion of the program, A general dentistry certificate is awarded to each resident whothe student will receive a certificate in endodontics and will possess the successfully completes the program. The primary teaching hospital isnecessary credentials to be declared "board eligible" by the American the Medical Center of Louisiana at New Orleans (Charity HospitalBoard of Endodontics. The student will spend approximately 50 campus and University Hospital campus). Other affiliated teachingpercent of the assigned time in clinical practice and the remaining in institutions are the LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistrybasic and clinical science lectures, research and seminars. Clinical (LSUHSC-SD), New Orleans, the LSU Health Sciences Center Schoolexperience will include the complete scope of endodontic practice. of Medicine, New Orleans, the V.A. Medical Center, New Orleans theMedically compromised as well as healthy patients are treated under rotations are scheduled through the departments of general dentistry,appropriate supervision. The range of treatment includes emergency pediatric dentistry, oral and maxillofacial surgery, general anesthesia,and diagnostic treatment, nonsurgical and surgical therapy, internal medicine, otorhinolaryngology, and emergency medicine.microscopic endodontics, vital and non-vital bleaching procedures, Residents are also instructed in hospital protocol and organization.intentional replants, and root extrusion techniques. Comprehensive care for dental patients on both an outpatient and inpatient basis, which includes extensive use of the operating room, is emphasized. Resident may also gain experience in teaching pre- Students are encouraged to elect to earn the Master of Science, doctoral students at LSUSD. Annual salaries for the first and secondwhile they complete the certificate program. Three applicants are year residents are $36,413 and $37,484, respectively. Appointment toaccepted annually. Applicants must have graduated in the upper the program is for a twelve-month period beginning July 1 throughportion of their dental school class and have successfully completed June 30, with a contract being sent after notification of acceptance. Aboth parts of the National Board Examination. The Graduate Record new contract is signed at the beginning of the second resident year.Examination is also required of all applicants. Research experience October 1 is the deadline for accepting new applications for theand clinical experience beyond dental school (such as private practice, following years resident class. The program participates in themilitary experience, residencies, or teaching), will strengthen the Postdoctoral Application Support Service (PASS). A personal interviewapplicants credentials. with faculty members and a tour of the main facilities in New Orleans (MCLNO, LSUHS-SD) is usually arranged during the months of November and/or December. Applications are accepted from senior The deadline for completed applications is October 1 of the year dental students who will be completing their predoctoral studies or frompreceding anticipated enrollment. Interviews are held during October graduates of dental schools recognized by the Council on Dentaland early November, with acceptances, alternates, and rejections Education of the American Dental Association and have successfullyannounced by November 15. completed Part I and II of the National Board Examinations. Applications from graduates of dental schools from outside the United States may be considered for program acceptance with confirmed successful completion of Parts I and II of the National BoardGENERAL DENTISTRY Examinations and the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Applicants are required to secure a restricted or full license(ADVANCED EDUCATION PROGRAM) to practice dentistry in Louisiana upon acceptance as a resident in the program. This is a one-year advanced education school-based program,which offers a certificate upon completion. The program emphasizes MAXILLOFACIAL PROSTHETICScomprehensive care through a variety of didactic and clinicalexperiences. The Commission on Dental Accreditation, a specialized The Advanced Educational Program in Maxillofacial Prosthetics is aaccrediting agency that is recognized by the United States Department twelve-month course of study, commencing in July of each year. Theof Education, accredits this program. The student will spend time spent in the program is directed to the treatment of patients withapproximately 80% of the assigned time in clinical practice at the congenital and acquired defects of the head and neck area. UponSchool of Dentistry, the Lallie Kemp Regional Medical Center, in successful completion of the program, the student will be awarded aIndependence, Louisiana, and the Huey P. Long Memorial Center, certificate in maxillofacial prosthetics and will be eligible to take thenear Alexandria, Louisiana. The remaining time will be spent in clinical American Board of Prosthodontics examination. The 12-month courselectures and seminars. The objectives of the program are to increase of study includes (1) Seminar and conferences in various medicalthe students skill and knowledge in all aspects of dentistry including specialties pertaining to the treatment of the medically compromiseddiagnosis and treatment planning, complex restorative dentistry, dental patient (2) Instruction in the clinical art of maxillofacialrestoration of dental implants, esthetic dentistry and practice prosthetics (3) Multidisciplinary courses which include radiationmanagement. Annual stipend: $36,413. Personal interviews are oncology and reconstructive surgical principles (4) Experience in aarranged for applicants hospital environment at the Medical Center of Louisiana and the Lions LSU Clinics in New Orleans (5) Instruction and clinical procedures in acquired maxillary and mandibular defects (6) Laboratory techniques in all phases of prosthodontics to include complete removable, fixed partial dentures, and extraoral prostheses and (7) Optional research opportunities in the basic sciences or clinical areas. One applicant is selected each year. Candidate should possess competitive academic credentials and must have completed a residency program in Prosthodontics. A personal site visit is encouraged and applications must be received by October 15. 126
  • 29. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 127ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY The matching program provides an orderly method to enable applicants to obtain positions in the first year residency program of their choice and also help programs obtain applicants of their choice. The Advanced Educational Program in Oral and Maxillofacial This will eliminate an inequitable recruitment process that forcesSurgery at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New premature decisions, which put unnecessary pressure on bothOrleans is a six-year OMS-MD residency program designed to fulfill applicants as well as programs. This is very similar to the Nationalthe educational requirements of the Council on Dental Education of the Matching Program, which involves medical students applying toAmerican Dental Association and the American Board of Oral and medical residency programs throughout the United States. ApplicantsMaxillofacial Surgery. Each year four applicants are selected to begin and programs continue to contact each other directly and interview andseventy-two months of training. The Medical Center of Louisiana at evaluate each other independently of the Matching Program. However,New Orleans (Charity and University Hospitals in New Orleans) serves no offers are made during this period. After all the interviews areas the primary teaching hospital. Other affiliated institutions are Earl K. completed, both applicants and residency programs submit aLong Medical Center in Baton Rouge, Carolinas Healthcare System confidential "Rank Order List" in which they list the applicants orand the Dental and Medical Schools of Louisiana State University programs in order of their preference. Both applicants and programsHealth Sciences Center. Biomedical science instruction is incorporated may safely list preferred choices first without consideration for howthroughout the six-year residency program. Formal didactic courses they will be ranked by the other party. All information submitted to theoutside of the medical school curriculum include Applied Head and Matching Program would be kept confidential.Neck Surgical Anatomy, Advanced Oral Pathology, TMJ Diseases, andOrthognathic Surgery. Conferences consist of Clinical Pathology, Participating programs must offer all first year positions through thePreoperative Surgery, Journal Club and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Matching Program. Programs may not make or require anyTeaching Seminars. commitments or contracts with anyone prior to the release of the Match results. Similarly, applicants may apply only to programs that are Enrollment in the LSU Health Sciences Center School of Medicine participating in the Matching Program or until the results of the Matchin New Orleans for Introduction to Clinical Medicine, Clinical Pathology are released. The confidential "Rank Order List" submitted by eachand Dermatology is concurrent with the initial twelve-month clinical oral program and applicant are the sole determinants of their respectiveand maxillofacial surgery rotation. Advanced standing for third year order or preference of the match.entry into medical school is predicated on passage of the nationalMedical Boards Step I in June of the applicants first year of training. The Match results constitute a binding commitment from whichFollowing 24 months of medical school, one year of General Surgery neither the applicant nor the program can withdraw without mutualcredit is gained with rotation in the Emergency Room, General Surgery written agreement. The program must offer appointments to eachand Surgical Subspecialties, Neurosurgery, and Anesthesia. The applicant with whom it is matched and the applicant must accept theresidents return to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department for offer from the program unless both parties agree to release each othertwenty-four months to complete the program. from the Match result. The program may not accept any applicant who was matched elsewhere and subsequently not released from that Patient load during the thirty-six months of oral and maxillofacial match.surgery training includes extensive maxillofacial hard and soft tissuetrauma and reconstruction, orthognathic, and craniofacial surgery,temporomandibular joint disorders, all forms of cosmetic surgery,pathology, preprosthetic and implant surgery, advanced exodontia, and LSUHSC New Orleans Six-Year Oral &ambulatory outpatient general anesthesia. The combined annualinpatient surgery at all teaching hospitals exceeds 1,500 cases. Over Maxillofacial Surgery/MD Program25,000 outpatients are seen each year, which accounts for 6,000procedures. 1st Year OMS-12 months integrated with: Graduate Head and Neck Anatomy. The program is closely supervised by five full-time and fifteen part Graduate Oral Pathology Course.time board certified Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Monthly (yearly) Introduction to Clinical Medicine.salaries for first, second, third, and fourth year trainees (2001-2002) Dermatology.are $3,034.41 ($36,413.00), $3,123.66 ($37,484.00), $3,237.66 Clinical Pathology.($38,852.00), and $3,368.50 ($40,422.00) respectively. Pass Step I of Medical National Boards. Applicants must be graduates or seniors in the upper 25% of theirclass of dental schools recognized by the Council on Dental Education 2nd Year Clerkships of 3rd academic year at LSU Health Sciencesof the American Dental Association. Applications from graduates of Center Medical School in New Orleans.dental schools outside the U.S. and Canada will be considered if spacepermits. Participation in the Postdoctoral Application Support Service 3rd Year Clerkships of 4th academic year - LSU Health Sciences(PASS) program is required. Additional experience beyond dental Center Medical School in New Orleans.school (general practice residency, anesthesia residency, private Anesthesiology, 1-2 month.practice, graduate school, etc.) may strengthen the applicants Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2-3 months.credentials. A $30.00 processing fee payable to the LSU Health M.D. Awarded.Sciences Center School of Dentistry is required of those applying. Afterall applications have been received and reviewed, invitations for 4th Year General Surgery Iinterviews will be sent out by the Director of the Department of Oral General Surgery and subspecialties, 5-6 months.and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency program. Neurosurgery, 3-4 months. Anesthesiology, 2-3 months. Applications are received before October 1st of the preceding year, OMS, 1-2 months.and applicants must agree to participate in the Oral and MaxillofacialSurgery Residents Matching Program, the description of which is 5th Year OMS,12 monthsexcerpt from the AAOMS below. Graduate Orthognathic Surgery Course. The use of the matching program for first year residents in Oral and 6th Year OMS, 12 monthsMaxillofacial Surgery Residency Programs has been utilized for Elective Cosmetic or Cleft Palate rotation (optional).residency positions since 1986. This program is sponsored by the Certificate Awarded.American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons andadministered through the National Matching Service. The matchingprogram is financed by fees paid by the AAOMS, applicants, andprograms participating. 127
  • 30. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 128ORAL MEDICINE (RESIDENCY) morphogenesis, anatomy, and statistics. A research project is also required of each student. All applicants are required to take the Graduate Record Examination, foreign students must take the TOEFL The Oral Medicine Residency Program at LSU School of Dentistry and completed applications must be received by September 1 of theand Medical Center of Louisiana (MCLA) is a comprehensive 24-month year preceding matriculation.hospital based program. There are no tuition costs associated with thecertificate program. There is a parallel Master of Science (M.S.) andMasters of Public Health (MPH) degree track. There are tuition costsassociated with the M.S. and M.P.H. degrees. PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY The Oral Medicine Program combines extensive advanced didactic The Program in Pediatric Dentistry is university based and balancedand clinical experiences that supplement the General Dentistry with significant hospital and extramural affiliation at the Medical CenterResidency (GPR) curricula and objective of providing oral care to a of Louisiana, New Orleans and Childrens Hospital of New Orleans,medically complex patient population. Additionally, the program New Orleans. The program is designed to prepare highly qualifiedprovides advanced clinical experiences in internal medicine, specialists for the clinical practice of pediatric dentistry or careers inemergency medicine, dermatology, neurology, radiology, hematology, teaching or research. The twenty-four month course of study includesoncology, otorhinolaryngology, pain diagnosis/management and (1) seminars in clinically oriented basic sciences (2) instruction inpsychiatry. Graduates of this program will be able to provide all advanced clinical procedures, including minor tooth movement (3)aspects of oral health care to medically compromised populations. training in hospital procedure, including general anesthesia (4)Graduates will also be adept at diagnosis and treatment of oral experiences in providing comprehensive dental health for handicappedmucosal disease, salivary gland disorders and orofacial pain. children (5) courses in research methodology and biomedical sciences applicable to health care in children. A research project is required for Successful completion of this intensive program will result in both certification. The program has been planned in accordance with theGPR and Oral Medicine certificates. This program is fully accredited by standards for the Commission on Dental Accreditation Advancedthe American Board of Oral Medicine and graduates are eligible for the Specialty Education Programs in Pediatric Dentistry and is accreditedAmerican Board of Oral Medicine diplomate examination. by the American Dental Association, Council on Dental Education. Upon completion of the program, the postgraduate student receives a The program is chiefly based at The Medical Center of Louisiana at certificate in pediatric dentistry and meets eligibility requirements forNew Orleans. Other affiliated teaching institutions are Louisiana State the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry examination. Stipends forUniversity School of Dentistry and Touro Medical Center. The program the program include $6,700 for the first year and $8,700 for the secondhas a competitive salary and benefits package. Salary is $33,351(PGY year. Applicants should be graduates in the upper half of their class1) and $34,332 (PGY 2). Prior research experience, advanced clinical and are encouraged to take the Graduate Record Examination.experience or teaching experience is highly desirous. Completed applications must be received by November 1 of the year preceding matriculation. Prerequisites for application and enrollment into the certificateprogram include a DMD or DDS degree from an accredited Americanor Canadian institution. Foreign candidates must posses a DMD, DDSor equivalent degree and demonstrate proficiency in the Englishlanguage as measured through the test of English as a foreign PERIODONTICSlanguage (TOEFL) exam. Foreign candidates must have the requiredstudent visas. Applicants will be required to secure a restricted or full The Periodontic Program begins July 1st of each year and is oflicense to practice dentistry in the state of Louisiana upon acceptance thirty-six months duration. Upon completion of the program the studentinto the program. Degree seeking candidates may have additional will be awarded a Certificate in Periodontics and will be eligible to takeenrollment criteria and prerequisites and should refer to the the American Board of Periodontology examination. The program isappropriate section of the catalogue. multifaceted and utilizes facilities and faculty to provide (1) A strongPersonal interviews prior to acceptance are required foundation in the basic sciences, including surgical anatomy, cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, and others (2) Clinical science courses that include occlusion, oral medicine, oral pathology, minor tooth movement and multidisciplinary courses such as periodontic-ORTHODONTICS prosthetics, periodontic-endodontics, dental implantology, etc. (3) An extensive review of the periodontal literature to provide the basis for The Program in Orthodontics is a twenty four month course of study understanding current philosophies of therapy and to establish abeginning in July of each year. The program is designed to offer a biologic basis for formulating comprehensive treatment plans (4)broad foundation in the basic sciences and to provide a background of Exposure to a wide range of periodontal problems requiring a variety ofdetailed knowledge essential to the understanding of orthodontics. The therapeutic procedures. (Students are encouraged to work with severalprogram meets the educational requirements of the American Board of different full and part time faculty to gain experience in and to be ableOrthodontics, also it was accredited in 2001 with a status of “A”. to evaluate firsthand the different techniques available) (5) ResearchPrimary emphasis is on clinical training, which is correlated with and opportunities in either basic science or clinical areas to enable thesupplemented by lecture, seminar, demonstration and conference student to accomplish a meaningful original research project (6)instruction. Mastery of the edgewise appliance is stressed. Treatment Experience in a hospital environment at VA Medical Center of Newwith functional appliances is also emphasized as an augmentation to Orleans involving both out-patient and operating room surgery andfixed appliance therapy. In addition to the treatment of routine rotations in internal medicine and anesthesia (7) Teaching experienceorthodontic problems, each student treats several patients with severe in both the classroom and clinic to communicate those principles andmalocclusions, requiring a combined orthodontic surgical approach to skills acquired during training. In addition, faculty input into thesetherapy. Guest lecturers introduce other appliance techniques currently various areas is supplemented by several guest lecturers during theused throughout the world. The opportunity exists for students to year. Up to four applicants are accepted annually. Candidates shouldobtain a Master of Science degree through one of the basic science possess competitive academic credentials, have passed Parts I and IIdepartments of the Health Sciences Center. Such a program would of the National Board examination and have demonstrated a definiterequire the approval of the head of the Department of Orthodontics and interest in periodontics. The Graduate Record Examination is requiredthe head of the basic science department in which the degree is if a Masters degree is to be pursued. Additional experience beyonddesired. It is estimated that approximately twelve additional months of dental school (internship or residency, military service, private practice,full time attendance will be necessary to complete the requirements for graduate school, etc.), strengthens the applicants credentials. Athe Master of Science degree. Some of the courses offered over the personal site visit is required for the benefit of both the applicant andtwo-year period are: orthodontic theory and diagnosis, orthodontic the faculty. Completed applications are due by August 15th of the yeartechnique, biomechanics, surgical orthodontics, craniofacial preceding planned entrance. 128
  • 31. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 129PROSTHODONTICS FACULTY ROSTER The Program in Prosthodontics is a thirty-six month course of study,commencing in July of each year. The time spent in the program may EMERITIvary as it is designed to encompass the three main areas ofprosthodontics, namely, removable, fixed and maxillofacial BOUDREAUX, RAYMOND E. SR. - D.D.S., Loyola Universityprosthodontics. Upon successful completion of the program, the (Louisiana), 1937student will be awarded a certificate in prosthodontics and will be Emeritus Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeryeligible to take the American Board of Prosthodontics examination. Thethirty-six month course of study includes the following (1) Seminars in BRUGGERS, HOWARD - D.D.S., Northwestern University, 1953clinically oriented basic science courses (2) Instruction in advanced Emeritus Professor of Fixed Prosthodonticsclinical procedures (3) Clinical science courses which includeocclusion, oral medicine, oral pathology, periodontic-prosthetic, BUTLER, JOHN A. - D.D.S., Loma Linda University, 1959prosthetics, oral facial pain, and other multidisciplinary courses (4) Emeritus Professor of General DentistryResearch opportunities in the basic sciences or clinical areas (5)Selective courses to prepare for a career in academic dentistry (6) CAPDEBOSCQ, CAMILLE B. JR.- D.D.S., Loyola UniversityMultiple other courses which will allow the student to help tailor the (Louisiana), 1963program (7) Experience in a hospital environment at the Medical Emeritus Professor of Operative DentistryCenter of Louisiana, New Orleans (Charity Hospital) and (8) Theopportunity to obtain a Masters Degree through the Graduate School CARIMI, ANTHONY B. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1949is available. Two applicants are selected each year, and candidates Emeritus Professor of Community Health and Dental Hygieneshould possess competitive academic credentials and havedemonstrated an interest in prosthodontics. Additional experience CARVEL, ROSA I. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1967beyond dental school and submission of the results of the Graduate Emeritus Professor of Oral PathologyRecord Examination strengthen the applicants credentials. A personalsite visit is encouraged for the benefit of the applicant and the faculty. COULSON, ROLAND A. - Ph.D., London, 1944All applications should be received by September 30th. All candidates Emeritus Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biologymust apply to the National Matching Program. CROWE, REUBEN A. JR. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1959 Emeritus Professor of Operative DentistryPATIENT SERVICES FERRERO, EUGENE - D.M.D., Tufts University, 1946 In keeping with the mission of the LSU system, involving the Emeritus Professor of Oral Diagnosis/Medicine/Radiology"development of the highest levels of intellectual and professionalendeavor in programs of instruction, research, and service," the Health FORTIER, PETER A. - D.D.S, University of Tennessee Health ScienceSciences Center operates patient clinics staffed by full time faculty Center, 1959members on a rotating basis, with expertise in the complete range of Emeritus Professor of Radiologyspecialties in the health sciences, offering services to other healthprofessionals and the general public, on a fee for service basis. GARDINER, JANE F. – D.D.S., Loyola University, 1969 Emeritus Professor of Prosthodontics For further details, regarding such patient services offered by theLSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry, call: (504) 619-8535 GOLDBERG, ALBERT T., II - D.D.S., Howard University, 1966or 619-8536. Emeritus Professor of Prosthodontics GUERRA, LOUIS R. – D.D.S. Loyola University, 1959 Emeritus Professor of Prosthodontics HATREL, PAUL P. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1959 Emeritus Professor of Operative Dentistry HERBERT, FRANK L. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1948 Emeritus Professor of General Dentistry LEGETT, BENJAMIN J., JR. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1950 Emeritus Professor of General Dentistry LUEBKE, RAYMOND G. - D.D.S., University of Michigan School of Dentistry, 1951 Emeritus Professor of Endodontics MATTA, MEFFRE R. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1941 Emeritus Professor of General Dentistry and Removable Prosthodontics SCHIELE, RAYMOND J. - D.D.S., Loyola University, 1956 Emeritus Professor of Prosthodontics SHANNON, JOHN L. - D.D.S., Ohio State University, 1964 Emeritus Professor of Prosthodontics SHAYE, ROBERT - D.D.S., New York University, College of Dentistry, 1963 Emeritus Professor of Orthodontics 129
  • 32. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 130 BRISCO, STEPHEN C. - D.D.S., Louisiana State University, 1986SUNDIN, ROBERT H. - D.D.S., University of Illinois, 1950 Clinical Assistant Professor of General DentistryEmeritus Professor of General Dentistry BRUNS, ROBERT E., IV – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1999 Clinical Assistant Professor of General DentistryZINCK, JAMES H. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1959 BULLARD, HUGH F. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1985Emeritus Professor of Operative Dentistry; Eastman Professor of Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatric DentistryOperative Dentistry BURAS, DANIEL E. - D.D.S., Loyola University, 1971 Clinical Assistant Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial SurgeryZIMNY, MARILYN L. - Ph.D., Loyola University (Illinois), 1954 BURGESS, JOHN O. - D.D.S., Emory University, School of Dentistry,Emeritus Professor of Cell Biology and Anatomy 1975Dean, and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Professor and Head of Operative Dentistry and Biomaterials CADE, JAMES E. - D.D.S., University of Tennessee, 1979 Professor, Oral Diagnosis / Medicine / RadiologyABBOTT, KATHY - D.D.S., Marquette University, 1984 CAICEDO, RICARDO - D.D.S., Colegio Odontologico (Colombiano),Clinical Assistant Professor of Periodontics 1979AKIN, RICHARD K. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1968 Assistant Professor of EndodonticsClinical Associate Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery CARIMI, JOHN M.ANDREWS, JOHN - D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1972 Instructor, Dental Health Resources, Dental MedicaidClinical Assistant Professor of Prosthodontics CARR, RONALD F. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1964ANDRIEU, SANDRA C. - Ph.D., University of New Orleans, 1991 Professor of Oral Pathology and PathologyAssociate Dean for Academic Affairs; Professor CARRUTH, PHILIP L. - D.D.S., University of Tennessee, 1979ANZELMO, JOSEPH - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1973 Clinical Associate Professor of ProsthodonticsClinical Assistant Professor of Endodontics CASTELLON, PAULINO – D.D.S., University of Guadalajara, Mexico,ARMBRUSTER, PAUL C. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1996 1996Assistant Professor of Clinical Orthodontics Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatric DentistryARNOLD, DEBRA C. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1977 CATCHINGS, SANDRA – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1990Clinical Professor of Prosthodontics Clinical Assistant Professor of General DentistryARRIBAS, ALFREDO – D.D.S., Peruvian University, 1994 CHADHA, JAGDISH M. - D.D.S., University of Iowa, 1964Assistant Professor of Clinical General Dentistry Assistant Dean for Advanced Education; Professor and Head ofAUCOIN, LEONARD W., JR. - M.Ed., University of New Orleans, 1996 OrthodonticsClinical Associate Professor, Program in Dental Laboratory CHEUK, SHU L. - D.D.S., Washington University School of DentalTechnology, Department of Prosthodontics Medicine, 1973BABIN, VICTOR - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1972 Professor, General DentistryClinical Assistant Professor of Pediatric Dentistry CHICHE, GERARD C. - D.D.S., University of Paris (France), 1980BALDO, RONALD - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1985 Professor and Head of ProsthodonticsClinical Assistant Professor of Oral Diagnosis/ Medicine/Radiology CHUSTZ, JOSEPH R. - D.D.S., Loyola University, 1965BARNETT, JOHN L., JR., - D.D.S., Howard University,1975 Clinical Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry and BiomaterialsClinical Assistant Professor of Pediatric Dentistry COLEMAN, CHARLES T. - D.M.D., Temple University, 1996BARRE, BARTON C. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1986 Clinical Assistant Professor of General DentistryClinical Associate Professor of Prosthodontics COMEAUX, RANDAL - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1978BARRETT, RONALD A. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1965 Clinical Assistant Professor of PeriodonticsProfessor, General Dentistry CONNICK, CHARLOTTE M. - M.S., Boston University, 1981BARSLEY, ROBERT E. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1977 Associate Professor, Dental Health ResourcesDirector, Dental Health Resources, Dental Medicaid COPELAND, FRANKLYN E. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana),Professor of Oral Diagnosis / Medicine / Radiology 1958BATES, MICHAEL L. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1992 Associate Professor, EndodonticsAssistant Professor of Clinical General Dentistry COREIL, MARK N. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1986BEIER, ERNEST A. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1975 Clinical Assistant Professor of OrthodonticsClinical Assistant Professor of General Dentistry COTHREN, GREGORY T. - D.D.S., University of Tennessee, 1970BELL, MARY JANE – D.M.D., Medical University of South Carolina, Clinical Assistant Professor of General Dentistry2000 COURTOIS, THERESA – B.S., University of Bridgeport, 1979Assistant Professor of Clinical Operative Dentistry and Biomaterials Clinical Instructor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department of GeneralBENOIT, GENEVIEVE M. - M.Ed, University of Southwestern DentistryLouisiana, 1992 DABIR, PRIYARDARSHAN A. – B.D.S.,Associate Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department of Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatric DentistryGeneral Dentistry DAGATE, JOHN D. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1980BLANCAS, MONICA L. – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 2000 Assistant Professor and Clinical Specialist of General DentistryClinical Assistant Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department DAVENPORT, WILLIAM D., JR. - Ph.D., Medical College of Georgia,of General Dentistry 1976BLATZ, MARKUS B. - D.M.D, Albert-Ludwigs University of Freiburg, Associate Professor of Oral Pathology; Adjunt Associate Professor of1994 Cell Biology and Anatomy; Coordinator of Support TechnologiesAssistant Professor of Prosthodontics DEDERICH, DOUGLAS N. - D.D.S., University of Iowa, 1983BLOCK, MICHAEL S. - D.M.D., Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Associate Professor and Head of Periodontics1979 DEJEAN, GANTT – D.D.S, Loyola University, 1972Professor and Director of Advanced Education in Oral and Maxillofacial Clinical Assistant Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, DepartmentSurgery of General DentistryBOOZER, CHARLES H. - D.D.S., University of Texas, 1957 DELATTE, ROY J. – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry,1980Professor and Head of Oral Diagnosis/Medicine/Radiology Clinical Instructor of Oral Diagnosis/Medicine/RadiologyBOUSTANY, FRANCIS E. – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1976 DE NICOLA, ROSS J. - D.D.S., Loyola University, 1960Clinical Assistant Professor Program in Dental Hygiene, Department of Clinical Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry and BiomaterialsGeneral Dentistry DICKERSON, ALAN C. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1987BOZEMAN, THOMAS B. – D.D.S., University of Texas at San Antonio, Clinical Assistant Professor of Periodontics1999 Clinical Assistant Professor of Endodontics DIEL, WINSTON B. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1979BRANNON, ROBERT B. - D.D.S., Baylor University School of Clinical Assistant Professor of PeriodonticsDentistry, 1966 DUBROC, GLENN C., JR. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1989Associate Professor of Clinical Oral Pathology Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthodontics 130
  • 33. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 131DUMMETT, CLIFTON O., JR. - D.D.S., Indiana University, 1969 HUBAND, MICHAEL L. - D.D.S, Medical College of Virginia, 1993Professor and Head of Pediatric Dentistry Assistant Professor of General DentistryDUVIC, WILLIAM D., – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1975 HUBAR, J. SEAN - D.M.D., University of Manitoba, 1979Associate Registrar, Department of Dental Health Resources Professor, Oral Diagnosis / Medicine / RadiologyDYESS, BRIAN N. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1983 INDOVINA, ANTHONY A. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1974Clinical Assistant Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinical Associate Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial SurgeryERICKSON, JEFFREY D. - Ph.D., George Washington University, IRELAND, EDWARD J., JR. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana),1993 1970Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics ProfessorEVANS, GERALD H. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1979 JEANSONNE, BILLIE G. - D.D.S., Loyola University, 1968Professor, Periodontics Associate Professor, EndodonticsFARRAR, SUZANNE K. - B.S., Loyola University (New Orleans), 1975 KAPUSTA, DANIEL R. - Ph.D., LSU Medical Center, 1986Clinical Instructor of Periodontics Professor of Pharmacology and Experimental TherapeuticFAUST, WILLIAM B. IV. – Ph.D., University of New Orleans, 1996 KEATS, BRONYA J.B. - Ph.D., Australian National University, 1976Instructor of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics Professor and Head GeneticsFAVALORO, GUY A. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1963 KENT, JOHN N. - D.D.S., University of Nebraska, 1963Clinical Professor of Orthodontics Boyd Professor and Head of Oral and Maxillofacial SurgeryFIDEL, PAUL L. – Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, 1988 KIDDY, AMY – B.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1999Professor, Microbiology, Immunology, and Parasitology Clinical Instructor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department of GeneralFINGER, ISRAEL M. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1982 DentistryProfessor KIRKENDOL, PAUL L. - Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 1971FINLEY, JAMES M. – D.M.D., University of Mississippi, 2000 Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Experimental TherapeuticsAssistant Professor of Clinical Periodontics KITIYAKARA, AMARA - Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1960FONTENOT, CHARLES J. – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1977 Associate Professor of PathologyClinical Assistant Professor of Orthodontics KROWICKI, ZBIGNIEW K. - Ph.D., Silesian School of MedicineFOURNET, LEON F. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1964 (Poland), 1985Clinical Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Experimental TherapeuticsFRUGE, JAMES F., JR. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1978 LAFONT, BRITTA E. – M.Ed., University of New Orleans, 1999Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthodontics Assistant Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department ofFUSELIER, GRACE A. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1984 General DentistryClinical Associate Professor of Prosthodontics LALLIER, THOMAS E. - Ph.D., University of California, Irving, 1991GALLO, JOHN R. III - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1992 Associate Professor of Cell Biology and AnatomyAssistant Professor of Clinical Operative Dentistry and Biomaterials LAYMAN, DON L. - Ph.D., George Washington University, 1970GARBEE, WILLIAM H. - D.D.S., Virginia Commonwealth University, Associate Professor of Cell Biology and Anatomy1975 LEBLANC, JEFFREY - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1993Associate Professor, Oral Diagnosis / Medicine / Radiology Clinical Assistant Professor of OrthodonticsGARDINER, DIANA M. - Ph.D., University of Alabama, 1979 LE BON, SUSAN - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1981Professor and Director of Instructional Services, Accountability and Clinical Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry and BiomaterialsPlanning LEDOUX, WILLIAM R. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1977GIACONA, FRANCIS T., JR. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1977 Clinical Professor of OrthodonticsClinical Assistant Professor of General Dentistry LEIGH, JANET E. - D.M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1991GIBSON, WILLIAM A. – D.D.S., Ohio State University, 1956 Associate Professor of Clinical General DentistryClinical Professor of Oral Pathology LEMON, RONALD R. - D.M.D., University of Kentucky, 1971GLAVIANO, GARY A. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1975 Professor and Head of EndodonticsClinical Associate Professor of Prosthodontics LIBERTO, VINCENT N. - D.D.S., Loyola University, 1957GOTTSEGEN, MARSHALL I. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), Professor of Pediatric Dentistry; Director of Continuing Education1964 LILES, SAMUEL L. - Ph.D., LSU School of Graduate Studies of theClinical Professor of Orthodontics Medical Center, 1968GRUNER, RICHARD E. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1967 Professor of PhysiologyClinical Professor of Prosthodontics LOFTON, HARRIET – B.S., Loyola University, 1977GUMPERT, CARL – D.D.S, Loyola University, 1958 Clinical Instructor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department of GeneralClinical Assistant Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department Dentistryof General Dentistry LONG, HENRY A. – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 2000HARRISON, JAMES D. - D.D.S., Saint Louis University, 1951 Clinical Assistant Professor of General DentistryProfessor, Prosthodontics LONG, JAMES H. – D.D.S, LSU School of Dentistry, 1982HAYCOCK, JOHN W. - Ph.D., University of California, 1975 Clinical Assistant Professor of General DentistryProfessor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology LOUQUE, RAYMOND E. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1995HEBERT, MYRA H. – B.S., Northeast Louisiana University, 1978 Assistant Professor of Clinical General DentistryClinical Instructor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department of General LUFTIG, RONALD B. - Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1967Dentistry Professor and Head of Microbiology, Immunology, and ParasitologyHENRY, CRAIG A. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1977 MALDONADO, HECTOR - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1984Clinical Associate Professor of Orthodontics Clinical Assistant Professor of OrthodonticsHERBERT, JACK D. - Ph.D., LSU Medical Center, 1967 MALLOY, RANDOLPH – D.D.S., University of Iowa College ofAssociate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Dentistry, 1971HILLER, MICHAEL E. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1987 Clinical Associate Professor of Oral & Maxillofacial SurgeryClinical Assistant Professor of Orthodontics MANDERS, JAMIE M. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1979HOCHSTEDLER, J Lee - D.D.S., University of Tennessee, 1976 Clinical Assistant Professor of General DentistryAssociate Professor, Prosthodontics MANUEL, MAURICE, Jr. – D.D.S., Loyola University, 1955HORNBY, PAMELA, J. - Ph.D., University of Kentucky, 1984 Clinical Assistant Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, DepartmentProfessor of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutic of General DentistryHORNSBY, C. GRADY, JR. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1975 MARKLE, KENNETH F. – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1993Clinical Associate Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinical Assistant Professor of PeriodonticsHOVLAND, ERIC J. - D.D.S., Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, MARTELLO, FRANCIS G. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1979Dental School University of Maryland Clinical Assistant Professor of General DentistryDean, LSU School of Dentistry; Professor of Endodontics 131
  • 34. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 132MASON, CAROLINE F. - M.ED., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1975 PAUL, DENNIS J. - Ph.D., University of British Columbia, 1988Associate Professor, Head of Program in Dental Hygiene, Department Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeuticof General Dentistry PAZOKI, ALEXANDER E. – D.D.S., New York University College ofMASON, JOHN D. - D.D.S., Virginia Commonworth (Virginia), 1974 Dentistry, 1992Assistant Professor of Clinical Periodontics Assistant Professor of Clinical Oral & Maxillofacial SurgeryMASSETT, EDWARD C., JR. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), PEARSON, BRYAN – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 19791970 Clinical Assistant Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, DepartmentClinical Associate Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of General DentistryMC CABE, CHARLES T. – D.M.D., University of Pittsburg, 1976 PELON, WILLIAM - Ph.D., Kansas State University, 1954Clinical Assistant Professor of Periodontics Professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and ParasitologyMC COMBS, MICHAEL H. - D.D.S., West Virginia University, 1980 PERERA, JORGE P. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1990Clinical Assistant Professor of General Dentistry Clinical Assistant Professor of Oral Diagnosis/Medicine/RadiologyMC DONALD, GARY T. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1968 PERKINS, TERESA – D.M.D., Harvard University, 1981Associate Dean for Clinical and Hospital Affairs; Professor of Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatric DentistryProsthodontics POE, OLIVER C. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1963MC DONALD, GEORGIA K. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1988 Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatric DentistryClinical Assistant Professor of Periodontics PORTER, JOHNNY R. - Ph.D., LSU Medical Center, 1973MC DONOUGH, KATHLEEN H. – Ph.D., University of Missouri, 1977 Professor of Physiology and MedicineProfessor and Acting Head Department of Physiology PORTER-WILLIAMS, ANDRETTA - D.D.S., Meharry Medical College,MC KEON, DAVID L. – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1991 1992Assistant Professor, Dental Health Resources, Dental Medicaid Clinical Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry and BiomaterialsMC KNIGHT, HUGH V. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1978 POUSSON, REBECCA R. - M.B.A., University of Phoenix, 2001Clinical Assistant Professor of General Dentistry Assistant Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department ofMC MINN, ROBERT W. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1971 General DentistryClinical Associate Professor of Orthodontics PRATER, LARRY D. - D.D.S., University of Missouri at Kansas City,MENDEZ, ARTURO J. - D.D.S., National Autonomous University of 1971Mexico (Mexico), 1974 Clinical Assistant Professor of General DentistryProfessor PRICE, HELEN J. – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1995MENERAY, MICHELE A. - Ph.D., Colorado State University, 1979 Clinical Assistant Professor of General DentistryProfessor of Physiology RAIGRODSKI, ARIEL J. – D.M.D., Hadassah School of DentalMISIEK, DALE J. - D.M.D., University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Israel, 1991Medicine, 1978 Assistant Professor of Clinical ProsthodonticsClinical Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery RAMELLI, LINDA O. - B.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1993MIZE, R. RANNEY - Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1975 Clinical Assistant Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, DepartmentProfessor and Head of Cell Biology and Anatomy of General DentistryMOELLER, LAURIE - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1990 RAPPOLD, ALLAN P. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1975Assistant Professor of Clinical General Dentistry, Coordinator of AEGD Associate Professor, Prosthodontics and Director of ClinicsMOERSCHBAECHER, JOSEPH M., III - Ph.D., American University, RASMUSSEN, ROBERT H. - Ed.D., University of New Orleans, 19751976 Clinical Professor of Instructional ServicesProfessor of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics REDDIX, RHODA A. - Ph.D., Indiana University (Bloomington, Indiana)MOHAMED, SHAWKY E. – B.D.S, University of Cairo, 1961 1990Professor Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Experimental TherapeuticsMONICA, RONALD A. - D.D.S., St. Louis University Dental School, REGAN, ROBERT L. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 19931958 Clinical Assistant Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial SurgeryClinical Assistant Professor of Periodontics REISIG, GREER C. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1989MOSES, RANDY L. - Ph.D., University of Texas, 1976 Clinical Assistant Professor of Oral Diagnosis/Medicine/RadiologyProfessor of Cell Biology and Anatomy RIPPS, ALAN H. - D.M.D., University of Alabama, 1972MURPHY, GUY L. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1967 Professor of Operative Dentistry and BiomaterialsClinical Assistant Professor of General Dentistry RITCHIE, JOHN R. - D.D.S., University of Iowa, 1979MUSSELMAN, ROBERT J. - D.D.S., Indiana University, 1964 Associate Professor and Head of General DentistryProfessor ROBIE, NORMAN W. – Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina,MUZYKA, BRIAN C. - D.M.D., Temple University, School of Dentistry, 19721990 Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Experimental TherapeuticsAssociate Professor RODRIGUEZ, MARIO S. – D.D.S., Loyola University, 1969NAKAMOTO, TETSUO - Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Associate ProfessorTechnology, 1978 ROGERS, WILLIAM A. - M.Ed., University of New Orleans, 1988Professor of Physiology ProfessorNECAISE, DANNA G. – B.S., Loyola University, 1981 ROONEY, ROBERT J. – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1990Clinical Instructor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department of General Clinical Assistant Professor of ProsthodonticsDentistry ROSHAN, SUSAN – D.D.S., Tehran University, 1991NGUYEN, HIEP Q. – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 2000 Clinical Assistant Professor of General DentistryClinical Assistant Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department ROSKOSKI, ROBERT, JR. - Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1968of General Dentistry Fred G. Brazda Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyNORTH, PATRICK T. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1961 ROY, SUSAN – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1987Clinical Professor of Prosthodontics Clinical Assistant Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, DepartmentO’BRIEN, MICHEAL – D.D.S., Loyola University School of Dentistry, of General Dentistry1970 SADAN, AVISHAI - D.M.D., Hadassah School of Dental Medicine,Assistant Professor of Clinical Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Israel, 1991OERTLING, KAREN M. - M.P.H., Tulane University, 1978 Associate Professor of ProsthodonticsClinical Associate Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department SARKAR, NIKHIL K. - Ph.D., Northwestern University Dental School,of General Dentistry (Chicago), 1973PALMISANO, DONNA A. – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1990 ProfessorClinical Assistant Professor of Prosthodontics SARPHIE, THEODORE G. - Ph.D., University of Mississippi, 1972PATON, LEE A. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1994 Associate Professor of Cell Biology and AnatomyClinical Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry and Biomaterials 132
  • 35. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 133SCHIAVO, JULIE H. - M.L.I.S., University of Southern Mississippi, VILLEMARETTE, JAN – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 19991996 Clinical Assistant Professor of General DentistryInstructor of Medical Bibliography WAGUESPACK, GERI M. - M.S., College of St. Francis, 1987SCHIELE, RAYMOND J. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1956 Clinical Associate Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, DepartmentDirector of Clinic Operations; Associate Professor, Program in Dental of General DentistryLaboratory Technology, WALKER, RICHARD S. - D.D.S., University of Missouri, 1975Department of Prosthodontics Associate ProfessorSCHNEIDER, PAUL E. - D.D.S., Indiana University, 1968 WALSH, TERENCE E. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1960Professor Clinical Associate Professor of OrthodonticsSCHWANINGER, BERNHARD M. – D.D.S., Zurick, 1970 WEIR, JIM C., JR. - D.D.S., University of Tennessee, 1974Clinical Professor of Orthodontics Assistant Dean for Admissions; Professor and Head of Oral PathologySCHWARTZ, ELAINE S. - B.S., Loyola University, 1977 WELCH, MARK A. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1977Assistant Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department of Clinical Assistant Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial SurgeryClinical General Dentistry WELCH, SARAH J. – D.D.S., Ohio University, 1987SHANNON, JOHN L. - D.D.S., Ohio State University, 1964 Clinical Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry and BiomaterialsProfessor WHITLEY, JOHN B. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1983SHAW-SMITH, PAMELA R. - D.D.S., Georgetown University, 1985 Clinical Assistant Professor of OrthodonticsClinical Assistant Professor of Pediatric Dentistry WILLHITE, CORKY - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1979SHEA, DANIEL R. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1994 Clinical Assistant Professor of ProsthodonticsClinical Assistant Professor of Operative Dentistry and Biomaterials WILLIAMS, CHARLES S. - D.D.S., Meharry Medical College ofSHETTY, KISHORE – B.D.S., University of Bombay, 1994 Dentistry, 1991Clinical Assistant Professor of General Dentistry Clinical Assistant Professor of PeriodonticsSHOPPER, THOMAS P. - D.D.S., Ohio State University, 1972 WINK, CAROLE S. - Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, 1977Associate Professor Associate Professor of Cell Biology and AnatomySISON, Shari – B.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1999 WINKLER, MARK M. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1981Clinical Instructor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department of General Associate ProfessorDentistry WINSAUER, PETER J. - Ph.D., The American University (Washington,SMITH, CHET A. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1990 D.C), 1989Assistant Professor of Clinical General Dentistry Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Experimental TherapeuticsSMITH, DEMARCUS D. IV – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1981 YEADON, WILLIAM R. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1981Clinical Assistant Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinical Associate Professor of Oral Diagnosis/ Medicine/RadiologySONGU-MIZE, EMEL - Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1979 YU, ALIKA – D.D.S., State University of New York at Buffalo School ofProfessor of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics Dental Medicine, 1994SPITZER, JOHN J. - M.D., University of Munich (West Germany), Clinical Assistant Professor of Periodontics1950 YUKNA, RAYMOND A. - D.M.D., Tufts University, 1968Boyd Professor and Head of Physiology Professor and Coordinator of Postgraduate Program of PeriodonticsSPRIGGS, LOUAINE – Ph.D., Tulane University, 1990Associate Professor of Cell Biology and AnatomySPRINGSTEAD, MARY CATHERINE - M.Ed., Loyola University, 1975 RECAPITULATIONAssociate ProfessorST. GERMAIN, JEANNE - B.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1989Clinical Instructor of Periodontics Below are listed active faculty members of the School of Dentistry, bySTEEG, CLARENCE J., JR. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), department or other designation, academic rank, and in alphabetical1967 order of each:Clinical Professor of ProsthodonticsSTEVENS, HUEY M. – D.D.S., Loyola University, 1954 Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyClinical Assistant Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department PROFESSOR: Haycock; Roskoskiof General Dentistry ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: HerbertSTROTHER, ELIZABETH A. - M.L.S., M.B.A., University of NewOrleans, 1979Associate Professor of Medical BibliographySWEARINGEN, WILBA S. - M.A., M.L.S., University of Wisconsin- Cell Biology and AnatomyMilwaukee, 1977 PROFESSOR: Mize; MosesAssociate Professor of Medical Bibliography ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Davenport; Layman; Lallier ; Sarphie;THUNTHY, KAVAS H. - B.D.S., University of Bombay (India), 1969 SpriggsProfessorTOMASZEWSKI, JAMES P. - D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1974 Dental Health Resources, Dental MedicaidClinical Associate Professor of Prosthodontics PROFESSOR: BarsleyTOSO, DONALD R. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1966 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Connick , DuvicClinical Professor of Orthodontics ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Herbert; McKeonTOWNS, TOOLEY M. - D.D.S., Loyola University (Louisiana), 1969 INSTRUCTOR: CarimiClinical Associate Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial SurgeryTURPIN-MAIR, J. SUZANNE - BCh.D., (Leeds), L.D.S., Royal Collegeof Surgeons Endodontics(London), 1970 PROFESSOR: Hovland; LemonAssociate Professor ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Copeland; JeansonneVan Nortwick, Wallace – D.D.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1978 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Anzelmo; Bozeman; CaicedoClinical Assistant Professor of ProsthodonticsVARNER, KURT, J. - Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1987 General DentistryAssociate Professor of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics PROFESSOR: Barrett; CheukVELA, DAVID - B.S., Southeastern Louisiana University, 1986 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Leigh; RitchieAssociate Professor, Program in Dental Laboratory Technology, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Arribas; Bates; Beier: Brisco; Bruns;Department of Clinical Prosthodontics Catchings; Coleman; Cothren; Dagate; Giacona: Huband; Long; Long;VICTORIANO, DANIELLE A. - B.S., LSU School of Dentistry, 1997 Louque; Manders; Martello; McCombs; McKnight; Moeller; Murphy;Clinical Assistant Professor, Program in Dental Hygiene, Department Prater; Price; Roshan; Shetty; Smith; Villemaretteof Clinical General Dentistry 133
  • 36. LSU Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry 134Genetics OrthodonticsPROFESSOR: Keats PROFESSOR: Chadha; Favaloro; Gottsegen; Ledoux; Schwaninger; Sheridan; TosoProgram in Dental Hygiene ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Henry; McMinn; Walsh ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Armbruster; Coreil; Dubroc; Fontenot;PROFESSOR: Andrieu Fruge; Hiller; Leblanc; Maldonado; WhitleyASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Benoit; Mason; Oertling; Springstead;WaguespackASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Blancas; Boustany; Dejean; Gumpert; PathologyManuel; Nguyen; Pearson; Pousson; Ramelli; Roy; Schwartz; Stevens; PROFESSOR: Carr; Rodriguez; Strong; NewmanVictoriano ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Kitiyakara; Liuzza; SloopINSTRUCTOR: Courtois; Hebert; Kiddy; Lofton; Necaise; Sison; Pediatric DentistryInstructional Services PROFESSOR: Dummett; Liberto; Musselman; SchneiderPROFESSOR: Gardiner; Rasmussen ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Poe ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Babin; Barnett; Bullard; Dabir; Perkins;Medical Bibliography Shaw-SmithASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Strother; SwearingenINSTRUCTOR: Schiavo Periodontics PROFESSOR: Evans; YuknaMicrobiology, Immunology and ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Dederich; Rodriguez ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Abbott; Comeaux; Dickerson; Diel; Finley;Parasitology Markle; Mason; McCabe; McDonald; Monica; Pearson, Williams; YuPROFESSOR: Fidel; Luftig; Pelon INSTRUCTOR: Farrar; St. GermainOperative Dentistry & Biomaterials Pharmacology and ExperimentalPROFESSOR: Burgess; Ireland; Ripps, Sarkar TherapeuticsASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Turpin-Mair; Walker; Winkler PROFESSOR: Kapusta; Lanier; MoerschbaecherASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Bell; Chustz; DeNicola; Gallo; LeBon; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Kirkendol; Paul; Robie; WinsauerPaton; Porter-Williams; Shea; Welch ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Reddix INSTRUCTOR: FaustOral and Maxillofacial SurgeryPROFESSOR: Block; Fournet; Kent; Misiek PhysiologyASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Akin; Hornsby; Indovina; Malloy; Massett; PROFESSOR: Liles; Meneray; McDonough; Nakamoto; PorterO’Brien; TownsASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Buras; Dyess; Philippe; Regan; Smith;Welch Program in Dental Laboratory Technology PROFESSOR: RogersOral Diagnosis, Medicine and Radiology ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Aucoin; VelaPROFESSOR: Boozer; Cade; Hubar; ThunthyASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Garbee; Muzyka; Shopper; Yeadon ProsthodonticsASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Baldo; Perera; Reisig PROFESSOR: Arnold; Chiche; Finger; Gruner; Harrison; McDonald;INSTRUCTOR: Delatte Mendez; Mohamed; North; Steeg ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Barre; Carruth; Fuselier; Glaviano;Oral Pathology Hochstedler; Rappold; Sadan, Tomaszewski ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: Andrews; Blatz; Castellon; Palmisano;PROFESSOR: Gibson; Weir Raigrodski; Rooney; Van Nortwick; WillhiteASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: Brannon; Davenport 134

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