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    Have Your Say: Children and Young People Using Cosmetic ... Have Your Say: Children and Young People Using Cosmetic ... Document Transcript

    • HAVE YOUR SAY: CHILDREN AND YOUNGPEOPLE USING COSMETIC SURGERY ANDSOLARIUMS IN QUEENSLANDOctober 2007There is some evidence that there may be an increase in the number of Queenslandchildren and young people under the age of 18 using cosmetic surgery procedures andusing solariums for cosmetic tanning.The Queensland Government wants to hear Queenslanders’ views about the extent ofthis problem and whether existing regulatory arrangements for cosmetic surgeryprocedures and solarium use are enough to protect the wellbeing of Queenslandchildren and young people.WHAT ARE COSMETIC SURGERY AND SOLARIUMS?In this paper, ‘cosmetic surgery’ refers to invasive (procedures that break the skin,such as breast enlargement, rhinoplasty (nose surgery), surgical face-lifts, tummytucks, liposuction, and collagen and botox® injections) and non-invasive (proceduresthat do not usually break the skin, such as chemical peels, microdermabrasion, andlaser hair removal) procedures performed for non-medical reasons.They are procedures that are performed on otherwise healthy people, purely forcosmetic reasons, not because of any medical reason.However, ‘cosmetic surgery’ does not include invasive and non-invasive proceduresdone for medical reasons, as directed by a qualified clinician. Procedures done formedical reasons could be to treat and correct physical conditions which causeproblems for the medical, psychological and social well being of people. Forexample, ear surgery (otoplasty), breast reduction in men (gynecomastia) andcorrective rhinoplasty (nose) surgery.A solarium (sun bed or tanning bed) is an indoor tanning machine that uses anartificial source of ultraviolet (UV) radiation applied to the skin surface to make theskin appear tanned.There are some forms of UV light treatments approved for medical use to treatconditions such as psoriasis, these are not included when we refer to ‘solariums’.This paper is only about access to solariums and cosmetic surgery performed onQueensland children and young people under the age of 18 for non-medical reasons.It does not cover: • any procedure undertaken for medical reasons at the direction of a medical or other qualified clinical professional • cosmetic dentistry which is performed by dentistry professionals 1
    • • tattoos and body piercing, which are not commonly regarded as cosmetic surgery.CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE’S USE OF COSMETIC SURGERY ANDSOLARIUMSThere is some evidence that there may be an increasing number of children and youngpeople in Queensland and Australia who are using cosmetic surgery. A popularAustralian young girls magazine recently published results of its survey of 4,000teenage girls aged 11 to 18. About 1,000 of those surveyed said they would get plasticsurgery if they could and 80 had already had cosmetic surgery.During the last few years a number of media articles have said that doctors arereporting an increase in adolescent patients enquiring about and demanding cosmeticsurgery, particularly rhinoplasty, liposuction and breast enhancement. The media haveexplained the trend for cosmetic surgery as being caused by young people’s obsessionwith celebrities, aggressive marketing by cosmetic clinics and some doctors, and thepromotion of having the perfect body.At the moment there are no statistics collected on what and how much cosmeticsurgery is performed in Queensland and Australia, or how old the people are that arehaving the surgery. There are also no statistics on the number and ages of peopleusing a solarium in Queensland or Australia. Without those statistics we are unable tosay for sure if there is an increasing trend in Queensland children and young peopleusing cosmetic surgery or solariums.When we are looking at what options there are to control access to cosmetic surgeryand solarium use by people under the age of 18 we need to consider a number ofissues such as physical, emotional and social development of young people.Physically, teenager’s bodies are still growing and developing. Emotionally, teenagersare vulnerable to social pressure, a desire to conform to stereotypes and cultural‘norms’. Teenagers are concerned about becoming attractive, confident andacceptable to others.The way children and young people view their bodies’ changes as they mature. Theway society views beauty also changes. Research has shown that while teenagers maydislike their appearance, this improves as they get older. Older teens feel better abouttheir bodies than younger teens. The features most disliked are those associated withculturally determined stereotypes portrayed in books, mass media and advertisements.Teenagers may later regret deciding to have cosmetic surgery.There are no studies or clinical trials on the safety and long-term risks of breastimplants or liposuction on patients under the age of 18. Breast development cancontinue into late teens and early twenties.There is limited scientific evidence indicating a link between solarium use anddevelopment of skin cancer. However, as a solarium uses an artificial source of UV,this could present a potential risk for skin cancer and skin damage. 2
    • WHO PROVIDES COSMETIC SURGERY AND SOLARIUMS INQUEENSLAND?In Queensland, cosmetic surgery procedures and solarium treatment for non-medicalreasons are only done by the private business sector and private health system.Queensland’s public health system does not perform cosmetic surgery procedures orsolarium treatment for non-medical reasons. Medicare rebates are not available forcosmetic procedures or solarium treatment for non-medical reasons.Cosmetic surgery procedures are performed by a range of providers in Queenslandincluding doctors, nurses, medical specialists, general practitioners, as well as beautytherapists for non-invasive cosmetic surgery procedures. These procedures areprovided in a range of private hospitals, clinics and small practices.Doctors providing cosmetic surgery often work in small practices or as employees inspecialised clinics, such as skin care clinics. The cosmetic surgery industry is highlycompetitive, which may restrict peer review and publishing of research which couldimprove clinical practice and training.It is illegal for a doctor to pay another doctor to refer patients to him or her. It is alsoillegal for a doctor to accept payment from another doctor for referring a person.However, there are several specialist referral agents who, although non-medicallytrained, provide advice to consumers on preferred procedures, techniques andproviders. Manufacturers and distributors of devices used in cosmetic surgery alsoplay a major role in patient referral and promotion of their products.There are approximately 200 solarium operators and about 350 solarium unitsoperating in Queensland. Solarium sessions are available through a number ofcommercial providers including; tanning salons, hairdressers, health and beautybusinesses and gyms.Solarium operators, although not medically trained, provide advice on solarium useand skin type assessment for suitability for client access.HOW ARE THE COSMETIC SURGERY AND SOLARIUM INDUSTRIESREGULATED IN QUEENSLAND?Queensland’s cosmetic surgery and solarium industries are not directly regulated bylegislation specifically designed to regulate those industries alone. Similarly, no otherAustralian State or Territory government has specific legislation regulating thecosmetic surgery or solarium industries. Instead, Australian governments have reliedon existing industry and professional legislation, industry self-regulation, andcommon law to regulate these industries. Some aspects of the law affecting cosmeticsurgery and solariums are mentioned below. 3
    • Industry self-regulationThe Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the Australasian College of CosmeticSurgery have advised their members to operate within established codes of practicethat encompass the need for:• a medical evaluation to ensure a patient’s suitability for the procedure and to identify possible risk factors or other factors that may result in a poor outcome• psychological evaluation to establish the reason the patient wants the procedure done and to identify possible psychological risk factors or indicators of poor outcome• patient education including information about the procedure, possible alternative treatments, obtaining a second opinion, information about complications, side- effects and expected realistic outcomes• obtaining informed consent and allowing for a “cooling off period” between the initial consultation and performance of the procedure.The operation of a solarium is governed by a voluntary Australian and New ZealandStandard, AS/NZS 2635:2002 Operation of Solaria for Cosmetic Purposes. Therequirements set out in this Standard provide the basis for the set up and operation ofartificial tanning equipment in commercial establishments with solarium facilities(including access by minors 15-17 years).Medical Practitioner RegistrationMedical practitioners performing cosmetic surgery are subject to regulation under anumber of Acts, including the Medical Practitioners Registration Act 2001 and theHealth Practitioners (Professional Standards) Act 1999. These Acts provide fordisciplinary action against doctors engaging in unprofessional conduct.The Medical Practitioners Registration Act 2001 also restricts the use of theprofessional titles ‘Surgeon’ and ‘Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon’ to fellows ofthe Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. However, the Act does not directlyrestrict use of the title ‘Cosmetic Surgeon’.Health Quality and Complaints CommissionAll health practitioners in Queensland are subject to the powers of the Health Qualityand Complaints Commission (“the HQCC”). The HQCC’s role is to oversee andsuggest improvement to the quality of health services and to undertake independentreview and management of health complaints. The HQCC has statutory powers toinvestigate individual complaints about health services, as well as complaints abouthealth quality and safety generally. The HQCC can report on the investigation orconciliate the complaint. However, cases of unprofessional or unethical conduct arereferred to the relevant registration Board (eg Medical Board).Radiation Safety Act 1999The Radiation Safety Act 1999 requires all persons who use radiation apparatus tohold an appropriate licence issued by the Chief Executive Officer, Queensland Health.These licences may only be issued to persons who have appropriate skills and 4
    • knowledge of the principles and practices of radiation protection, as well as expertisein the use of the radiation apparatus.Such apparatus include lasers that may be used to carry out a diagnostic, therapeuticor cosmetic procedure involving the irradiation of a person. Currently, licences maybe issued to persons for the use of a laser for procedures such as tattoo removal,superficial vascular lesion treatment, skin rejuvenation, hard and soft tissue dentalprocedures, dermatology, hair removal, and ophthalmology.Common lawPersons performing cosmetic surgery are also subject to tort law, including actions fornegligence. Negligence involves a failure in law to do what a reasonable personwould have done in the circumstances to avoid loss or injury to the plaintiff. It entailsconduct which falls below the standard demanded for the protection of others againstunreasonable risk or harm. A plaintiff can claim either special or general damages asa remedy for negligence.Consent IssuesIssues relating to the capacity for young people to consent and understand the risksassociated with cosmetic procedures and surgery also require consideration.In most cases, a parent’s right to make medical decisions for a child ceases when thechild turns 18. However, as children mature, they gradually acquire the right to maketheir own medical decisions and be entitled to the same confidentiality of medicalinformation as an adult patient.The High Court of Australia settled the common law test for determining a youngperson’s competence to make medical decisions in Marion’s case. The Court held thata minor is capable of giving informed consent when he or she achieves a sufficientunderstanding and intelligence to enable him or her to understand fully what isproposed.This test for competence to make medical decisions focuses on an assessment of theindividual young person’s level of maturity and understanding in relation to theproposed treatment (including the nature and consequences of that treatment). Factorswhich a doctor is likely to take into consideration when assessing a minor’scompetence to consent include: the child’s age, if the child is socially independent oftheir parents, the nature of the procedure, their insight into their condition, theirapparent maturity, intelligence and attitude, voluntary presentation rather than parent-organised appointment, family dynamic, signs of mental illness, social history andpersonality.Other than in exceptional circumstances (eg. an emergency), a person who performssurgery on a child who is not competent to give consent must obtain the consent ofthe child’s parent or guardian, or the approval of a court or authorised tribunal. If theperson performs the surgery without the proper consent, he or she risks being sued fordamages. 5
    • To be legally effective, consent must be informed. For this reason, clinicians usuallyexplain the proposed surgery and the risks involved with the patient before asking thepatient to sign a consent form. As noted above, codes of practice endorsed by theAustralian Society of Plastic Surgeons and the Australasian College of CosmeticSurgery advise their members to allow a “cooling off period” between the initialconsultation and obtaining consent.Prior to the commencement of any solarium session, it is a requirement by operatorsunder the current Australian and New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 2635:2002, that noindividual under the age of 18 without parental or guardian consent shall use a sun-tanning unit. And no individual under the age of 15 shall be permitted under anycircumstance to use a sun-tanning unit. Solarium operators shall ensure that a ClientConsent Form is handed to the client, for completion, signing and return. For minors15-17 years the Standard requires a Client Consent Form to be signed by theparent/guardian before session commencement.HAVE YOUR SAYThe Queensland Government wants to hear your views about children and youngpeople using cosmetic surgery and solariums in Queensland.This discussion paper "Have Your Say: Children and Young People Using CosmeticSurgery and Solariums in Queensland" is available electronically by: Following the links at: www.qld.gov.au Emailing to request an electronic copy at: cosmeticsurgery@health.qld.gov.au.Please have your say by completing the attached survey by 30 November 2007 by: Email to: cosmeticsurgery@health.qld.gov.au Mail to: Review of Cosmetic Surgery & Solariums for Children & Young People Queensland Health GPO Box 48 BRISBANE QLD 4001 Complete online by following the links at: www.qld.gov.au 6
    • SURVEY: CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE USING COSMETICSURGERY AND SOLARIUMS IN QUEENSLANDPlease mark an ‘X’ in the box that best describes your response.About you 1. What is your age? a. 0-10 years  b. 11-15 years  c. 16-17 years  d. 18-30 years  e. 30-45 years  f. 45-65 years  g. 65 years and over  2. Sex: a. Male  b. Female  c. Other  3. Which of the following best describes you: (You can mark more than one box.) a. Child  b. Young person  c. Parent or guardian  d. Cosmetic surgery practitioner, owner or operator  e. Plastic surgeon  f. General Practitioner  g. Other medical or health professional  h. Solarium owner or operator  i. Gymnasium owner or operator  j. Beauty therapist  k. Other  4. Have you or anyone in your family: a. Had cosmetic surgery for non-medical purposes? YES  NO  b. Used a solarium for cosmetic tanning? YES  NO  5. If you answered yes to any of Question 4, were you/they happy with the outcome? YES  NO  6. If you answered yes to Question 4a, what age were you or the family member when the cosmetic surgery for non-medical purposes was performed?  7. How much did the cosmetic surgery for non-medical purposes cost? ………. 7
    • 8. How did you/they pay for the cosmetic surgery for non-medical purposes cost? ………………………………………………………………………… 9. If you answered yes to Question 4b, what age were you or the family member when the solarium for cosmetic tanning was used? Your thoughts about the issue generally 10. How concerned are you about children and young people under 18 using cosmetic surgery for non-medical reasons? a. Not concerned  b. Indifferent  c. Slightly concerned  d. Very concerned  11. How concerned are you about children and young people under 18 using a solarium for cosmetic tanning? e. Not concerned  f. Indifferent  g. Slightly concerned  h. Very concerned  12. Do you think there needs to be more regulation of the use of cosmetic surgery by children and young people for non-medical reasons? YES  NO  13. Do you think there needs to be more regulation of the use of solariums for cosmetic tanning by children and young people? YES  NO  14. Do you think there should be different levels of regulation for invasive (that is, procedures which break the skin) and non-invasive (that is, procedures that do not typically break the skin) cosmetic surgery? YES  NO Invasive cosmetic surgery(Invasive refers to those procedures that break the skin) 15. How concerned are you about children and young people under 18 using invasive cosmetic surgery for non-medical reasons? i. Not concerned  j. Indifferent  k. Slightly concerned  l. Very concerned  8
    • 16. Do you think children and young people under 18 should be allowed to have invasive cosmetic surgery for non-medical reasons? YES  NO  17. If you said yes to Question 12, what measures do you think should be taken before children and young people can use invasive cosmetic surgery for non- medical reasons? (You can mark more than one box.) m. Information and education YES  NO  n. Counselling YES  NO  o. Informed consent YES  NO  p. Cooling off period between the initial consultation and having the procedure performed YES  NO  q. Medical evaluation YES  NO  r. Psychological evaluation YES  NO  s. Parental or guardian’s consent YES  NO Non-invasive cosmetic surgery(Non-invasive refers to those procedures that do not typically break the skin) 18. How concerned are you about children and young people under 18 using non- invasive cosmetic surgery for non-medical reasons? t. Not concerned  u. Indifferent  v. Slightly concerned  w. Very concerned  19. Do you think children and young people under 18 should be allowed to have non-invasive cosmetic surgery for non-medical reasons? YES  NO  20. If you said yes to Question 15, what measures do you think should be taken before children and young people can use non-invasive cosmetic surgery for non-medical reasons? (You can mark more than one box.) x. Information and education YES  NO  y. Counselling YES  NO  z. Informed consent YES  NO  aa. Cooling off period between the initial consultation and having the procedure performed YES  NO  bb. Medical evaluation YES  NO  cc. Psychological evaluation YES  NO  dd. Parental or guardian’s consent YES  NO  9
    • Solariums 21. Do you think children and young people under 18 should be allowed to use a solarium for cosmetic tanning? YES  NO  22. If you said yes to Question 21, what measures do you think should be taken before children and young people can use a solarium for cosmetic tanning? (You can mark more than one box.) ee. Information and education YES  NO  ff. Counselling YES  NO  gg. Informed consent YES  NO  hh. Cooling off period between the initial consultation and using the solarium YES  NO  ii. Medical evaluation YES  NO  jj. Psychological evaluation YES  NO  kk. Parental or guardian’s consent YES  NO Information about the issue 23. Should information about the types, numbers and age of people using cosmetic surgery for non-medical reasons be collected? YES  NO  24. Should information about the types, numbers and age of people using solariums be collected? YES  NO  25. Do you think parents, children and young people need more information about cosmetic surgery and solariums? YES  NO Additional comments 26. Do you have any other comments? _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ 10