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Ch. 32 - The Dental Office
 

Ch. 32 - The Dental Office

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  • The patient’s first perception of a dental office will remain with that patient during future appointments. What are factors to consider when creating a positive experience for the patient? (Details, organization, the manner in which you receive, treat, and dismiss the patient.) All aspects of the dental office must be professional.
  • Why do you think the temperature in the clinical area is higher? (Usually the clinical area is a smaller area and has an overhead dental light, which generates heat.) What is a common statement from patients when air exchange is poor?
  • The wall covering should not be too “busy.” Wallpaper or paint is recommended. Why is a vinyl floor covering recommended for clinical and laboratory areas instead of carpeting? (Infection control. Vinyl flooring can be washed and disinfected.) Why are separate areas recommended for the patients when they are checking out? (Privacy, which is mandated under the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act [HIPAA] of 1996.)
  • Why is it important to keep specific sounds associated with the dental office from carrying throughout the office? Privacy: HIPAA took effect on April 14, 2003. All patient accounts, billing, and medical records must comply with the law.
  • Dental practices vary in size. However, certain critical components are found in all dental offices. The design of a dental office must follow guidelines set forth by the American Dental Association and the Americans with Disabilities Act.
  • What is one of the ways to ensure that the reception area is not a waiting room ? If the reception room is dirty or outdated, what impression will patients take away with them? (That the dental office and treatment procedures are also dirty and out-of-date.) Choose reading materials that will interest patients. Provide a place in the reception area where children can play with safe (plastic or soft) toys or read books. The toys should be kept away from traffic areas.
  • What are the positive aspects of the reception room pictured here? What are the negative aspects of the reception room? (Light-colored carpet may be hard to maintain.)
  • The administrative area should be separate from the reception and clinical areas to provide adequate patient privacy. No patient charts or information should be in plain sight or where other patients might have access to them.
  • What are the positive aspects of the administrative area pictured here? What are the negative aspects of the administrative area?
  • The treatment area is the control center of the clinical area. Most dental offices have two or more dental treatment areas per dentist and one operatory for the dental hygienist. What is the purpose of having more then one operatory for each dentist? (Increases efficiency.) Arrangements of the operatories should be similar in design. Why? (For easier access to items that may be kept in each room.)
  • What are the positive aspects of the treatment area pictured here? What is one negative aspect of the treatment area? Is this treatment room adequately equipped?
  • Dental chairs are available in different sizes for adult and pediatric practices. The headrest, which can be adjusted to the patient’s height, is used to support the patient’s head securely. Chair arms can be moved aside when the patient is being seated or dismissed.
  • Why should the dental chair have smooth, seamless surfaces and flat, smooth controls or buttons? Why are foot controls a positive design feature?
  • What features of the operator’s stool are important in reducing body and eye fatigue? (Adjustment up and down and ease of movement around the patient’s chair.) The minimum number of casters for adequate support and maneuverability on the operator’s stool is five.
  • Regardless of the assistant’s height or stature, the stool should allow the assistant to twist and turn to easily reach countertops and shelves. What is the purpose of the abdominal bar? (To help the assistant avoid lower-back pain caused by leaning over during the dental procedure.)
  • Notice the multiple casters on both the operator’s and the assistant’s stools. They add stability and maneuverability. Notice the footrest on the assistant’s stool. It allows the assistant to raise the stool above the operator to increase visibility while supporting the assistant’s weight. The feet are placed on the footrest so that the assistant’s thighs remain parallel to the floor for proper spine support.
  • What factors determine the type of dental unit placed in each operatory? Front delivery provides the operator with easy access to dental instruments and handpieces without the need for stretching or twisting. Side delivery allows the dental unit to be easily positioned for a left-handed or right-handed clinician. Rear delivery keeps dental instruments and handpieces out of the patient’s sight.
  • The dental unit pictured, depending on where it is attached at the base of the chair, may swing to provide front, side, or rear delivery. Notice the smooth design and limited number of crevices to facilitate cleaning. Multiple attachments can be prepared and made readily available during the dental procedures.
  • The amount of pressure placed on the rheostat by the clinician’s foot will determine the speed at which the handpiece revolves. The air-water syringe is necessary for every procedure. Often a dental unit will contain two air-water syringes, one close to the dentist and one close to the dental assistant.
  • Halogen bulbs are used in most operating lights. The light is attached to a flexible arm that is either track-mounted from the ceiling or attached to the wall or dental chair.
  • Disposable traps collect large debris, tooth structure, and old restorative materials that may loosen during tooth preparation and keeps them from becoming trapped in the plumbing pipes or expensive vacuum systems. The amalgamator and curing light can be mounted in a cabinet or under a countertop for easy access. However, the light cord must be able to reach to chair during dental procedures.
  • The central vacuum compressor has two parts: (1) a compressor that creates airflow and (2) a vacuum tank that screens the flow of air to create suction. The central air compressor must be subjected to routine maintenance to avoid the buildup of condensation, which will result in the formation of algae and sediment in the air lines and waterlines.
  • Who is responsible for the care of the clinical areas before and after the scheduled patients? (The dental assistant.) Careful completion of the morning steps ensures the smooth flow of patient care throughout the day.
  • Careful completion of the evening steps ensures that the equipment will be maintained and the team will be prepared for the next day. Turning off dental equipment before closing the office each day will minimize overnight equipment problems or possible damage to the dental office resulting from water leakage or fire.
  • The sterilization area is a crucial component of day-to-day operations. Step-by-step procedures and protocol must be followed to eliminate cross-contamination or infection-control problems that can injure a dental worker or patient.
  • What are some of the procedures performed in the dental laboratory? (Pouring of impressions, preparation of diagnostic models, and creation of custom impression trays.) All contaminated materials (alginate impressions, removable appliances, etc.) should be disinfected before being handled in the lab. Personal protective equipment (PPE) should be worn during laboratory procedures.
  • What is a consultation room? (A room where the dentist discusses diagnosis and treatment plans with the patient.)
  • This area may be used by the staff during personal time or for staff meetings. It is customary for the dentist to financially support a coffee service and food vendor. PPE should not be worn or taken into the staff lounge.

Ch. 32 - The Dental Office Ch. 32 - The Dental Office Presentation Transcript

  • The Dental Office Chapter 32 Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Chapter 32 Lesson 32.1 Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Learning Objectives
    • Pronounce, define, and spell the Key Terms.
    • Describe the six areas of the dental environment in a professional office.
    • Discuss the important qualities of the reception area.
    • Describe the goals in designing the dental treatment area.
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Introduction
    • Patients often judge the quality of care by the appearance of the dental office!
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Office Environment
    • Temperature
      • Reception area 72° F
      • Clinical area 68° to 70° F
      • Constant air exchange
    • Lighting
      • Reception area: table and floor lamps
      • Business area: fluorescent lighting
      • Clinical area: fluorescent and clinical lighting
    • (Cont’d)
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Office Environment
    • (Cont’d)
    • Wall and floor coverings
      • Calming colors
      • Floor covering
        • Durable carpet in reception, business, and private office areas
        • Vinyl in clinical and laboratory areas
    • Traffic control
      • Smooth transition to all areas of the office
      • Separate areas for business, clinical, and private functions.
    • (Cont’d)
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Office Environment
    • (Cont’d)
    • Sound control
      • Minimizing the sound of the dental equipment
      • Provide distraction from dental sounds with the use of music
    • Privacy
      • Administrative area
      • Dentist’s office
      • Staff lounge
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Specific Areas of the Dental Office
    • Reception area
    • Administrative/business office
    • Clinical-treatment area
    • Sterilization center
    • Dental laboratory
    • Dentist’s private office
    • Dental staff lounge
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Reception Area
    • Patients are received, greeted pleasantly, and made to feel welcome. The reception area is not a waiting room!
    • Things to remember:
      • Keep the area clean.
      • Ensure adequate seating.
      • Maintain up-to-date reading material.
      • Provide place for coats and umbrellas.
      • Offer a children's corner.
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Fig. 32-1 Design of the dental office, incorporating calming colors. Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Administrative Area
    • Hub for the management or the business side of the practice.
    • Equipment
      • Desk
      • Telephone system
      • Computers
      • Photocopier
      • Fax machine
      • Storage area for patient records
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Fig. 32-4 Organization and design of the business area. Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Treatment Area
    • Also referred to as the dental operatory; all clinical treatment is provided here.
    • Design goals
      • Providing comfort and mobility for the dental team
      • Providing privacy and comfort for the dental patient
      • Enhancement in the use of dental equipment through good time management and efficient techniques              
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Fig. 32-5 Dental treatment area. (Courtesy of A-dec.) Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Patient Dental Chair
    • Specific features
      • Full support to knees, bottom, back and head
      • Comfortable, movable arms
      • Easy to maintain and clean
      • Controls for adjusting the patient
        • Upright position: The back of the chair is upright at a 90-degree angle.
        • Supine position: The patient is lying down and his or her head and knees are at approximately the same level.
        • Subsupine position: The patient's head is lower than his or her feet.
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Fig. 32-6 Patient dental chair. (Courtesy of A-dec.) Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Operator’s Stool
    • Type of stool designed to support the body for a prolonged period in a fixed muscular activity
    • Specific features
      • Large seat and back
      • Easy adjustment for back support
      • A seat that is easy to lower and raise
      • Casters to make it easy to move around the patient
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Dental Assistant’s Stool
    • Type of stool that must provide stability, mobility, and comfort, allowing a proper fatigue-reducing posture
    • Specific features
      • Twists and turns to help the assistant reach countertops and shelves
      • Provides an adjustable foot platform or foot ring
      • Firm, secure cushioning in the seat
      • Abdominal bar positioned for support
      • Casters on which move the chair easily
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Fig. 32-11 Left, dental assistants’ stool. Right, operators’ stool. (Courtesy of A-dec.) Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Chapter 32 Lesson 32.2 Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Learning Objectives
    • Prepare the dental treatment area for patient care in the morning before seeing patients.
    • Prepare the dental treatment area for patient care the next day.
    • Discuss the basic functions of the dental unit.
    • List the clinical equipment most commonly found in dental treatment areas.
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Dental Unit
    • Provides the necessary electrical and air-operated mechanics to the hoses, attachments, and working parts of the unit.
    • Dental-unit delivery systems
      • Front delivery: positioned over the patient's lap
      • Side delivery: positioned at either side of the patient's chair
      • Rear delivery: positioned behind the dental chair
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Fig. 32-12 Dental unit. (Courtesy of A-dec.) Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Additional Clinical Equipment
    • Rheostat
      • A foot-controlled device placed on the floor near the operator to control the function of the dental handpieces
    • Dental unit waterlines
      • Supplies water through hoses or waterlines into the dental handpieces
    • Air-water syringe
      • Handheld instrument attached to the dental unit
      • Functions
        • Delivers a stream of water
        • Delivers a stream of air
        • Delivers a combined spray of air and water
      • (Cont’d)
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Additional Clinical Equipment
    • (Cont’d)
    • Operating light
      • Used to illuminate the oral cavity during a dental procedure
    • Oral evacuation system
      • A means of removing water, saliva, blood, and other fragments during a dental procedure
      • Types
        • Saliva ejector
        • High-volume evacuator (HVE)
    • (Cont’d)
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Additional Clinical Equipment
    • (Cont’d)
    • Disposable traps
      • Filtering mechanisms for the saliva ejector and HVE
    • Curing light
      • Used to “harden” or light-cure dental materials
    • Amalgamator
      • Used to triturate dental materials by means of vigorous shaking of the ingredients
    • (Cont’d)
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Additional Clinical Equipment
    • (Cont’d)
    • Central vacuum compressor
      • Provides the suction needed for the oral evacuation systems
    • Central air compressor
      • Provides compressed air for the air-water syringe and air-driven handpieces
    • (Cont’d)
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Care of Clinical Areas
    • Morning routine
      • Arrive 30 minutes before the first scheduled patient of the day.
      • Turn on the master switches for the central air compressor and vacuum units.
      • Ready the dental treatment rooms for patient care.
      • Recheck the appointment schedule.
      • Set up the treatment room for the first patient.
    • (Cont’d)
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Care of Clinical Areas
    • (Cont’d)
    • Evening routine
      • Complete the operatory exposure-control cleanup and preparation protocols.
      • Turn off all equipment.
      • Ensure that treatment rooms are adequately stocked for the next day.
      • Post appointment schedules for the next workday.
      • Ensure that instruments, patient records, and laboratory work are ready for the next day.
      • Ensure that the sterilization center has been cleaned.
      • Ensure that the treatment rooms are ready for use.
      • Place any soiled protective clothing in the appropriate container.
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Central Sterilization
    • Specific area for:
      • Cleaning, sterilizing, and storing instruments
      • Divided into a “contaminated area” and a “clean area”
      • Provides extra storage for supplies
      • Should be kept organized and clean at all times
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Dental Laboratory
    • Organized area away from patient care where the dentist and dental assistant perform laboratory procedures.
    • Specific items found
      • Workbenches
      • Storage cabinets
      • Model trimmer
      • Dental lathe
      • Laboratory materials
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Dentist’s Private Office
    • For use only by the dentist
    • Can also be used as a consultation room with patients
    • Specific items found
      • Desk
      • Telephone
      • Computer
      • Extra chairs
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Dental Staff Lounge
    • Designated private area for clinical and business staff
    • Specific items found:
      • Table and chairs
      • Small refrigerator
      • Microwave
      • Locker or locked cabinet for personal belongings
      • Coffee or food
    Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.