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    Aesthetic Facial Surgery of Male Patients: Demographics and ... Aesthetic Facial Surgery of Male Patients: Demographics and ... Document Transcript

    • Aesthetic Facial Surgery of Male Patients:Demographics and Market TrendsJ. David Holcomb, M.D.1 and Richard D. Gentile, M.D.2ABSTRACT Evaluation of member survey data from the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) and the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) from 2000 through 2004 reveals several procedure-specific as well as overall trends regarding utilization of aesthetic facial enhancement services. This gender- specific 5-year retrospective review indicates that males undergo significantly fewer procedures than females except for surgical hair restoration and otoplasty. There is a slight general trend toward decreased surgical but increased nonsurgical facial enhancement procedures. On a case per physician basis, AAFPRS physicians performed significantly more procedures for both males and females for every procedure and every year evaluated. Evaluation of age group data indicates that the 40- to 59-year-old age group accounts for the majority of surgical and non surgical facial enhancement requests. Despite anticipated growth of the 60- to 79-year-old age group, the 40- to 59-year-old age group is projected to remain relatively stable. Although continuing to pursue aesthetic facial enhancement services in significant numbers, men still represent a vast untapped market. This study yields important demographic and trend information that has implications for the current and future delivery of aesthetic facial enhancement services. KEYWORDS: Male, aesthetic, surgery, demographic T he first episode of ABC TV’s Extreme Make- improving upon nature or limiting the visible effects ofover aired in December 2002. This and similar plastic aging, plastic surgery has for some become a normal andsurgery ‘‘reality’’ television programs briefly enjoyed even necessary part of life.immense popularity, glamorized our specialty, and pro- Although media coverage and reality televisionvided certain insights into the process that patients and certainly contributed to heightened interest in plasticdoctors must navigate to achieve their appearance en- surgery in recent years, numbers of patients electing tohancement goals. Although many of these programs undergo surgical and nonsurgical facial enhancementhave been cancelled in the wake of falling ratings, plastic procedures did not necessarily experience an ‘‘extremesurgery has nonetheless become a regular and popular makeover’’ bounce. In fact, comparison of data fromtopic of everyday conversation as society has become 2000 and 2004 (see following) reveals generally de-more open about the subject and its merits. The benefits creased surgical but increased nonsurgical facial en-that often accrue to individuals who undergo aesthetic hancement procedures in males and females. Althoughplastic surgery cannot be refuted. As a reliable means of historically considered to account for the minority ofMale Aesthetic Facial Surgery; Editors in Chief, Fred Fedok, M.D., Gilbert J. Nolst Trenite, M.D., Ph.D., Daniel G. Becker, M.D., RobertaGausas, M.D.; Guest Editor, Richard D. Gentile, M.D. Facial Plastic Surgery, Volume 21, Number 4, 2005. Address for correspondence and reprintrequests: Richard D. Gentile, M.D., Facial Plastic and Aesthetic Laser Center, Beeghly Medical Park, Bldg. A, Suite 103, 6505 Market Street,Youngstown, OH 44512. 1Holcomb Facial Plastic Surgery, PLLC, Sarasota, Florida, 2Facial Plastic and Aesthetic Laser Center, Youngstown,Ohio. Copyright # 2005 by Thieme Medical Publishers, Inc., 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA. Tel: +1(212) 584-4662. 0736-6825,p;2005,21,04,223,231,ftx,en;fps00560x. 223
    • 224 FACIAL PLASTIC SURGERY/VOLUME 21, NUMBER 4 2005 Figure 1 Male patient who underwent multiple simultaneous aesthetic facial sugary procedures including midforehead browlift, upper eyelid lift, lower eyelid lift, face and neck lift, and direct excision melolabial fold. aesthetic surgery requests, males actually account for cant discretionary income and the willingness to spend similar or greater numbers of requests for a limited money on personal luxury items such as aesthetic surgery. number of aesthetic procedures. Despite a downward As this generation continues to age, maintenance of trend in aesthetic facial surgery procedures, AAFPRS appearance is likely to remain a priority. In addition, member surveys reveal a significant and rising trend of the greatest transfer of wealth in history is set to occur as patients undergoing multiple surgeries at the same time members of this generation exit this world. This may in or within the same year. It has been the authors’ turn positively affect the ability and/or willingness of the experience that males are as likely as females to request next generation to pursue similar luxuries. multiple procedures. Figure 1 shows one such example of Notwithstanding economic issues, numerous other a male patient who underwent multiple simultaneous factors also influence the decision to use discretionary aesthetic facial plastic surgery procedures. It is also income for aesthetic enhancement. According to the most noteworthy that the number of aesthetic body enhance- recent AAFPRS member survey, reasons cited by indi- ment surgery procedures increased year over year during viduals seeking aesthetic enhancement include desire to the same interval reviewed herein (2000 to 2004). improve self-image, look/feel better, look younger, look The 40 to 59 age group (gender neutral) accounts less tired, and improve appearance as well as work-related for the largest percentage of services rendered in both the reasons, desire to maintain competitiveness, and dislike of surgical and nonsurgical facial enhancement categories a specific feature. In addition, relationships played a (see following). This age group constitutes the current significant role with reasons for cosmetic surgery includ- age span of the ‘‘baby boomer’’ generation, which includes ing younger spouse, divorce, dating, remarriage, and individuals born between 1946 and 1964. The baby single status. In this chapter we review data from several boomer generation has been described as having signifi- organizations (American Academy of Facial Plastic and
    • AESTHETIC FACIAL SURGERY OFMALE PATIENTS/HOLCOMB, GENTILE 225Reconstructive Surgery [AAFPRS] and American Soci-ety for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery [ASAPS]) regardingdelivery of surgical and nonsurgical facial enhancementprocedures. Data from the AAFPRS and ASAPS mem-ber surveys were used to generate gender-specific 5-yearretrospective trend information for numerous surgical andnonsurgical facial enhancement procedures. In addition,data from the AAFPRS member surveys were used todetermine surgical and nonsurgical facial enhancementprocedure utilization by age group. Finally, United StatesCensus Bureau data were used to plot likely populationtrends as the youngest of the baby boomer generation nearretirement age. Data from the American Academy of CosmeticSurgery (AACS) and the American Society of PlasticSurgeons (ASPS) were excluded because of potentialsignificant overlap with other specialty society data.Certain data from ASPS and ASAPS were excludedbecause of inaccuracies inherent in the data collectionand extrapolation process. The extrapolated data at-tempted to estimate gross numbers of various proceduresperformed by more than 23,000 physicians across threespecialties (dermatology, plastic surgery, and otolaryng- Figure 2 Cheek implant 5-year trend. Average annual cheekology–head and neck surgery). When reviewing these implant procedures performed in male and female patients bydata, it became apparent that meaningful comparisons of ASAPS and AAFPRS member physicians (subtotals by genderprocedures performed per physician from these extrapo- and physician group).lated data would not be possible because large numbersof physicians in each specialty surveyed obviously do notperform certain procedures.FACIAL ENHANCEMENT TRENDSCheek AugmentationReview of AAFPRS and ASAPS member survey dataindicates that significantly more females than malesunderwent cheek implant procedures for each year be-ginning with 2000 and ending with 2004 (Fig. 2). Inaddition, a trend toward decreased cheek implant pro-cedures was apparent for both males and females. On acase per physician basis, AAFPRS physicians performedsignificantly more cheek implant procedures for bothmales and females for every year evaluated (no cheekimplant data for 2003 from AAFPRS).Chin AugmentationReview of AAFPRS and ASAPS member survey dataindicates that significantly more females than malesunderwent chin implant procedures for each year begin-ning with 2000 and ending with 2004 (Fig. 3). Inaddition, a trend toward decreased chin implant proce-dures was apparent for both males and females. On a case Figure 3 Chin implant 5-year trend. Average annual chin im-per physician basis, AAFPRS physicians performed plant procedures performed in male and female patients bysignificantly more chin implant procedures for both ASAPS and AAFPRS member physicians (subtotals by gendermales and females for every year evaluated. and physician group).
    • 226 FACIAL PLASTIC SURGERY/VOLUME 21, NUMBER 4 2005 Figure 4 Eyelid surgery 5-year trend. Average annual eyelid Figure 5 Facelift 5-year trend. Average annual facelift proce- surgery procedures performed in male and female patients by dures performed in male and female patients by ASAPS and ASAPS and AAFPRS member physicians (subtotals by gender AAFPRS member physicians (subtotals by gender and physician and physician group). group). (Fig. 6). In addition, the number of forehead lift Blepharoplasty procedures varied slightly in 2002 and 2003 while Review of AAFPRS and ASAPS member survey data otherwise exhibiting very little change (less than 10%) indicates that significantly more females than males underwent eyelid surgery procedures for each year beginning with 2000 and ending with 2004 (Fig. 4). In addition, a trend toward decreased eyelid surgery proce- dures was apparent for both males and females. On a case per physician basis, AAFPRS physicians performed significantly more eyelid surgery procedures for both males and females for every year evaluated. Rhytidectomy Review of AAFPRS and ASAPS member survey data indicates that significantly more females than males underwent facelift procedures for each year beginning with 2000 and ending with 2004 (Fig. 5). In addition, the number of facelift procedures varied very little except for a moderate decrease among females in 2002. On a case per physician basis, AAFPRS physicians performed significantly more facelift procedures for both males and females for every year evaluated. Forehead Lift Review of AAFPRS and ASAPS member survey data Figure 6 Forehead lift 5-year trend. Average annual forehead lift indicates that significantly more females than males procedures performed in male and female patients by ASAPS underwent forehead lift surgery procedures for each and AAFPRS member physicians (subtotals by gender and physi- year beginning with 2000 and ending with 2004 cian group).
    • AESTHETIC FACIAL SURGERY OFMALE PATIENTS/HOLCOMB, GENTILE 227Figure 7 Hair restoration surgery 5-year trend. Average annualsurgical hair restoration procedures performed in male and Figure 8 Laser resurfacing 5-year trend. Average annual laserfemale patients by ASAPS and AAFPRS member physicians resurfacing procedures performed in male and female patients by(subtotals by gender and physician group). ASAPS and AAFPRS member physicians (subtotals by gender and physician group).in other years. On a case per physician basis, AAFPRS cians performed significantly more laser skinphysicians performed significantly more forehead lift resurfacing procedures for both males and females forprocedures for both males and females for every year every year evaluated.evaluated. Surgical Lip EnhancementSurgical Hair Restoration Review of AAFPRS and ASAPS member survey dataReview of AAFPRS and ASAPS member survey data indicates that significantly more females than malesindicates that significantly more males than females underwent surgical lip enhancement procedures forunderwent hair restoration surgery procedures for each year beginning with 2000 and ending with 2004each year beginning with 2000 and ending with (Fig. 9). In addition, a trend toward increased surgical lip2004 (Fig. 7). In addition, a trend toward decreased enhancement procedures was evident in females whilehair restoration surgery procedures in males and fe- the opposite was true in males. On a case per physicianmales is evident following sharp increases in 2001. On basis, AAFPRS physicians performed significantly morea case per physician basis, AAFPRS physicians per- surgical lip enhancement procedures for both males andformed significantly more hair restoration surgery females for every year evaluated.procedures for both males and females for every yearevaluated. Otoplasty Review of AAFPRS and ASAPS member survey dataLaser Skin Resurfacing indicates that similar numbers of females and malesReview of AAFPRS and ASAPS member survey data underwent otoplasty procedures for each year beginningindicates that significantly more females than males with 2000 and ending with 2004 (Fig. 10). In addition,underwent laser skin resurfacing procedures for each no clear upward or downward trend for proceduresyear beginning with 2000 and ending with 2004 performed was evident in males or in females. On a(Fig. 8). In addition, a slight trend toward increase case per physician basis, AAFPRS physicians performedlaser skin resurfacing procedures was evident in fe- significantly more otoplasty procedures for both malesmales. On a case per physician basis, AAFPRS physi- and females for every year evaluated.
    • 228 FACIAL PLASTIC SURGERY/VOLUME 21, NUMBER 4 2005 Figure 9 Surgical lip enhancement 5-year trend. Average an- Figure 11 Rhinoplasty 5-year trend. Average annual rhinoplasty nual surgical lip enhancement procedures performed in male and procedures performed in male and female patients by ASAPS female patients by ASAPS and AAFPRS member physicians and AAFPRS member physicians (subtotals by gender and physi- (subtotals by gender and physician group). cian group). Rhinoplasty Review of AAFPRS and ASAPS member survey data indicates that greater numbers of females than males underwent rhinoplasty procedures for each year begin- ning with 2000 and ending with 2004 (Fig. 11). In addition, a trend toward decreased rhinoplasty proce- dures was more evident in males than in females. On a case per physician basis, AAFPRS physicians performed significantly more rhinoplasty procedures for both males and females for every year evaluated. Chemical Peels Review of AAFPRS and ASAPS member survey data indicates that greater numbers of females than males underwent chemical peel procedures for each year begin- ning with 2000 and ending with 2004 (Fig. 12). In addition, an upward trend was evident for females but no clear trend was evident for males. On a case per physician basis, AAFPRS physicians performed significantly more chemical peel procedures for both males and females for every year evaluated. Botox Cosmetic Injection Review of AAFPRS and ASAPS member survey data Figure 10 Otoplasty 5-year trend. Average annual otoplasty procedures performed in male and female patients by ASAPS indicates that greater numbers of females than males and AAFPRS member physicians (subtotals by gender and physi- underwent Botox Cosmetic injection for each year be- cian group). ginning with 2000 and ending with 2004 (Fig. 13). In
    • AESTHETIC FACIAL SURGERY OFMALE PATIENTS/HOLCOMB, GENTILE 229Figure 12 Chemical peel 5-year trend. Average annual chemical Figure 14 Procedure growth (contraction) 2004 versus 2000.peel procedures performed in male and female patients by Percent change in procedures performed in male and femaleASAPS and AAFPRS member physicians (subtotals by gender patients, respectively, in 2004 vs 2000 by AAFPRS and ASAPSand physician group). member physicians.addition, an upward trend was evident for both males procedures for both males and females for every yearand females. On a case per physician basis, AAFPRS evaluated.physicians performed significantly more Botox Cosmetic PROCEDURE GROWTH (CONTRACTION) 2004 VERSUS 2000 Data from the AAFPRS and ASAPS member surveys indicate an upward trend for males seeking hair restora- tion procedures and Botox Cosmetic treatments while the trend for the remainder of the procedures reviewed is either flat or downward (Fig. 14). The current trend analysis suggests that numbers of surgical procedures may be declining as a result of greater utilization of noninvasive alternatives. However, certain surgical pro- cedures may decline as other more modern techniques begin to take hold, for example, decrease in cheek augmentation procedures as more physicians perform midface lifts or increase use of filler materials, or both. It is again noteworthy that during the same period, non- facial aesthetic plastic surgery procedures have seen significant upward trends. UTILIZATION OF SURGICAL VERSUS NONSURGICAL FACIAL ENHANCEMENT SERVICES BY AGEFigure 13 Botox Cosmetic 5-year trend. Average annual BotoxCosmetic procedures performed in male and female patients by Patients’ age is certainly another significant factor withASAPS and AAFPRS member physicians (subtotals by gender regard to utilization of surgical and nonsurgical facialand physician group). enhancement services. The 40- to 59-year-old age group
    • 230 FACIAL PLASTIC SURGERY/VOLUME 21, NUMBER 4 2005 Figure 15 Utilization of surgical versus nonsurgical facial en- Figure 16 U.S. (anticipated) population growth by age group. hancement services by age group. Percent of surgical or non- Millions of persons for age groups 20–39, 40–59, 60–79, and surgical services rendered for age groups 20–39, 40–59, 60–79, 80þ. Data from the United States Census Bureau. and 80þ. Data from AAFPRS member surveys from 2000 through 2004 were used to arrive at average percent utilization by age group for surgical and nonsurgical services. Surgical procedures for this analysis included eyelid surgery, cheek im- contract slightly and the 20- to 39-year-old age group plant, chin implant, fat transfer, forehead lift, laser resurfacing, lip augmentation, and facelift. Nonsurgical procedures for this anal- will grow by about 10 million persons. The 80 þ -year- ysis included chemical peel, microdermabrasion, filler, and Botox old age group will also expand by nearly 50% during this Cosmetic injections. time period. Because the 40- to 59- and 60- to 79-year- old age groups account for utilization of approximately 80% of surgical facial enhancement services, it is clear that also currently represents the baby boomer genera- that demand for aesthetic facial surgery should remain tion exhibits the highest utilization of both surgical and high for many years. non surgical facial enhancement services among adults older than 20 years (Fig. 15). The 60- to 79-year-old age group is the second most likely to pursue surgical and CONCLUSIONS third most likely to pursue nonsurgical forms of facial The implications of this review extend beyond mere enhancement. The 20- to 39-year-old age group is the benchmarking among individual physicians or physician second most likely to pursue nonsurgical and third most groups. Nonetheless, the results of this very simple likely to pursue surgical forms of facial enhancement. comparison of procedures performed by two groups of The 80þ-year-old age group is the least likely to utilize physicians that provide aesthetic facial surgery services surgical or nonsurgical facial enhancement services cannot be ignored. Based on published data from both among adults older than 20 years. AAFPRS and ASAPS member surveys for the past 5 years, it is clear that AAFPRS physicians typically perform significantly more aesthetic facial plastic surgery U.S. (ANTICIPATED) POPULATION procedures in both males and females for all procedures GROWTH BY AGE GROUP evaluated. This overwhelming trend indicates that Understanding population trends can provide further AAFPRS member physicians are highly sought after insight into the future of aesthetic surgery and, in for their expertise and focused approach to delivery of particular, aging face surgery. As the last of the baby aesthetic plastic surgery services of the face, head, and boomer generation approaches retirement age over the neck. next 20 years, there will be a massive expansion of the If numbers of many of the typical facial en- 60- to 79-year-old age group (Fig. 16). During the same hancement procedures have seemingly peaked, market time period, the 40- to 59-year-old age group will share may become an increasing concern for individual
    • AESTHETIC FACIAL SURGERY OFMALE PATIENTS/HOLCOMB, GENTILE 231physicians. Population data from the United States to the paucity of detailed data regarding surgical andCensus Bureau, however, forecast a stable base of nonsurgical treatments and the corresponding need for40- to 59-year-olds and continuous expansion of enhanced collection of data to help identify emerging60- to 79-year-olds, the two age groups that have trends. This expanded data pool can then also be used torecently accounted for the majority of aesthetic facial improve benchmarking as well as to facilitate educationsurgery requests, over the next 20 years. If the number of patients regarding various procedures.of providers also increases, physicians may need toimprove marketing efforts to maintain status quo. Inaddition, delivery of nonsurgical forms of aesthetic REFERENCESenhancement is likely to play an increasingly importantrole because many nonsurgical aesthetic enhancement 1. American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructivepatients may ultimately elect to undergo aesthetic Surgery. 2000. Membership Survey: Trends in Facial Plasticsurgery. Surgery, June 2001Q1 Q1 Men and women do not exhibit identical trends 2. American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructivewith regard to utilization of aesthetic surgical facial Surgery. 2001 Membership Survey: Trends in Facial Plastic Q2 Surgery, April 2002Q2enhancement services. In 2005, AAFPRS member sur- 3. American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructivevey data indicated that the top five surgical procedures Surgery. 2002 Membership Survey: Trends in Facial Plasticfor men included hair transplantation, rhinoplasty, eye- Surgery, April 2003Q3 Q3lid surgery, scar revision, and facelift, whereas the top 4. American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructivefive surgical procedures for women included eyelid Surgery. 2003 Membership Survey: Trends in Facial Plasticsurgery, rhinoplasty, facelift, laser skin resurfacing, and Surgery, March 2004Q4 Q4forehead lift. Each year, more men than women undergo 5. American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2004 Membership Survey: Trends in Facial Plastichair restoration surgery and similar numbers of men and Surgery, March 2005 (online)Available at: http://www.aafprs.women undergo otoplasty procedures while more org/media/stats_polls/AAFPRSMEDIA2005.pdf. Accessedwomen than men undergo all other surgical and non- October 2005Q5 Q5surgical aesthetic facial enhancement procedures. Over 6. American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery ASAPS 2000the past 5 years, men and women have followed similar Statistics on Cosmetic Surgery (online). Available at: http://upward trends for Botox Cosmetic treatments and sim- www.surgery.org/download/2000stats.pdf. Accessed Octoberilar downward trends for eyelid surgery. Men have 2005Q6 Q6 7. American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery Cosmeticotherwise seen sharper decreases in several procedures Surgery National Data Bank, 2001 Statistics (online). Avail-including cheek implants, rhinoplasty, and surgical lip able at: http://www.surgery.org/download/2001stats.pdf.enhancement. For laser skin resurfacing, men exhibited a Accessed October 2005Q7 Q7slight downward trend while the opposite was true for 8. American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. Cosmetic Sur-women. gery National Data Bank, 2002 Statistics (online). Available at: Despite the recent downward trends, men are still http://www.surgery.org/download/2002%20stats_403.pdf.undergoing many facial enhancement procedures in Accessed October 2005Q8 Q8 9. American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. Cosmeticsignificant numbers. In addition, men are increasingly Surgery National Data Bank, 2003 Statistics (online). Avail-requesting nonsurgical facial enhancement procedures able at: http://www.surgery.org/download/2003-stats.pdf.such as Botox Cosmetic and filler injections. In our view, Accessed October 2005Q9 Q9the historical gender gap in delivery of aesthetic facial 10. American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. Cosmeticenhancement services means that men continue to rep- Surgery National Data Bank, 2004 Statistics (online). Avail-resent a largely untapped segment of this market. Draw- able at: http://www.surgery.org/download/2004-stats.pdf.ing further from this market segment may require Accessed October 2005Q10 Q10 11. U.S. Census Bureau. Population Division, Population Projec-continued evolution of men’s attitudes toward self- tions Branch. (NP-T3) Projections of the Total Residentimprovement and a more dedicated and targeted ap- Population by 5-Year Age Groups, and Sex with Special Ageproach to marketing these services to men. Categories: Middle Series, 1999 to 2100 (online). Available at: Although a helpful review that has further de- http://www.census.gov/population/www/projections/natsum-lineated market trends, this review also draws attention T3.htmlQ11 Q11
    • Author Query Form (FPS/00560)Special Instructions: Author please write responses to queries directly on proofs and thenreturn back.Q1: The reference 1 "American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2001" is not cited in the text. Please add an in-text citation or delete the reference.Q2: The reference 2 "American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2002" is not cited in the text. Please add an in-text citation or delete the reference.Q3: The reference 3 "American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2003" is not cited in the text. Please add an in-text citation or delete the reference.Q4: The reference 4 "American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2004" is not cited in the text. Please add an in-text citation or delete the reference.Q5: The reference 5 "American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 2004" is not cited in the text. Please add an in-text citation or delete the reference.Q6: The reference 6 "American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 2000" is not cited in the text. Please add an in-text citation or delete the reference.Q7: The reference 7 "American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Sugary, 2001" is not cited in the text. Please add an in-text citation or delete the reference.Q8: The reference 8 "American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Sugary, 2002" is not cited in the text. Please add an in-text citation or delete the reference.Q9: The reference 9 "American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Sugary, 2003" is not cited in the text. Please add an in-text citation or delete the reference.Q10: The reference 10 "American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Sugary, 2004" is not cited in the text. Please add an in-text citation or delete the reference.Q11: The reference 11 "U.S. Census Bureau, 1999" is not cited in the text. Please add an in-text citation or delete the reference.
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