• Save
CAH Presentation @ PAX East
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

CAH Presentation @ PAX East

on

  • 1,305 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,305
Views on SlideShare
1,254
Embed Views
51

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

3 Embeds 51

http://maxistentialist.tumblr.com 31
http://safe.tumblr.com 19
http://www.slideshare.net 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    CAH Presentation @ PAX East CAH Presentation @ PAX East Document Transcript

    • Cards Against HumanityThursday, March 10, 2011I’m Max, one of the creators of Cards Against Humanity. Talk about our project, what we did well, whatmistakes we made, and how having a strong brand helped our project.Cards Against Humanity is a party game for horrible people.
    • Thursday, March 10, 2011We made the game a few years ago and offered it as a free download on our website. This first versionwas made at Kinkos for about five bucks and hours and hours of cutting.
    • Thursday, March 10, 2011To our surprise, the game caught on. It was translated into other languages, and people shared thelink on college campuses. We got a few thousand downloads, and some great feedback, and wedecided that we wanted to try to make a more professional version of the game.
    • Thursday, March 10, 2011This was the product we designed - we planned to print 500 copies of the game. This versionwas designed to be as cheap as possible, we figured that it would be an uphill battle to getthe game funded for any amount. Our fundraising goal was $4,000.
    • Thursday, March 10, 2011Going in to the project, we decided to keep Cards Against Humanity as a free DIY downloadon our website. For a few months before Kickstarter, we asked people for their email address,voluntarily.This is our Kickstarter funding graph. So you can see for the first few days there, we justpromoted the game personally - Facebook, personal websites, asking our parents to give us$15.• After about a week (once we had some momentum on the page), we sent an email to all ofour website subscribers telling them about the project.• About a week after that, Kickstarter featured our project on the front page, and we reallytook off.• The other huge bump we got was the 48 hours left notification Kickstarter sent out.
    • Thursday, March 10, 2011Going in to the project, we decided to keep Cards Against Humanity as a free DIY downloadon our website. For a few months before Kickstarter, we asked people for their email address,voluntarily.This is our Kickstarter funding graph. So you can see for the first few days there, we justpromoted the game personally - Facebook, personal websites, asking our parents to give us$15.• After about a week (once we had some momentum on the page), we sent an email to all ofour website subscribers telling them about the project.• About a week after that, Kickstarter featured our project on the front page, and we reallytook off.• The other huge bump we got was the 48 hours left notification Kickstarter sent out.
    • Thursday, March 10, 2011Going in to the project, we decided to keep Cards Against Humanity as a free DIY downloadon our website. For a few months before Kickstarter, we asked people for their email address,voluntarily.This is our Kickstarter funding graph. So you can see for the first few days there, we justpromoted the game personally - Facebook, personal websites, asking our parents to give us$15.• After about a week (once we had some momentum on the page), we sent an email to all ofour website subscribers telling them about the project.• About a week after that, Kickstarter featured our project on the front page, and we reallytook off.• The other huge bump we got was the 48 hours left notification Kickstarter sent out.
    • Thursday, March 10, 2011Going in to the project, we decided to keep Cards Against Humanity as a free DIY downloadon our website. For a few months before Kickstarter, we asked people for their email address,voluntarily.This is our Kickstarter funding graph. So you can see for the first few days there, we justpromoted the game personally - Facebook, personal websites, asking our parents to give us$15.• After about a week (once we had some momentum on the page), we sent an email to all ofour website subscribers telling them about the project.• About a week after that, Kickstarter featured our project on the front page, and we reallytook off.• The other huge bump we got was the 48 hours left notification Kickstarter sent out.
    • Thursday, March 10, 2011After our project took off, we wound up with nearly four times our original goal. We wentback to the drawing board and redesigned the entire product. It’s actually being printed at anindustrial printer in China as we speak.
    • What did we do well?Thursday, March 10, 2011First thing we did was put a lot of thought into how we were going to present the game. This is reallyimportant for us because we were pretty sure we had created something that nobody would want.
    • GamesThursday, March 10, 20111. It’s a board game.2. It’s a party game that you need to play with a bunch of other human beings.3. It’s thoroughly anti-social.
    • Games Other peopleThursday, March 10, 20111. It’s a board game.2. It’s a party game that you need to play with a bunch of other human beings.3. It’s thoroughly anti-social.
    • Games Other Anti-social people humorThursday, March 10, 20111. It’s a board game.2. It’s a party game that you need to play with a bunch of other human beings.3. It’s thoroughly anti-social.
    • Thursday, March 10, 2011Cards Against Humanity is not for everyone.
    • “A party game for horrible people.”Thursday, March 10, 2011First thing we did was admit upfront exactly what the game was. This became a great catch phrase thatour parents hated, so we knew it was just right for us.
    • Thursday, March 10, 2011But we couldn’t get too silly - at the end of the day, people on Kickstarter need to accept onfaith that when they back you, you’ll deliver on the project. So we used a very safe, corporatedesign - the black and white helvetica - (that wound up making the cards even morehilarious) and we incorporated Kickstarter’s branding into our own materials. Here the pre-order button on our website is co-branded with Kickstarter’s interface.
    • Thursday, March 10, 2011Second thing we did really well was keep our backers engaged.We had a two-month campaign, and we wanted to make sure that our early backers helpedus promote the project as we got towards the end. So we up the $10,000 challenge - we’dadd 10 cards - and the $15,000 challenge - we’d add 50 cards. As soon as we announcedthis, our backers started posting about us on BoardGameGeek, Reddit, Tumblr, SomethingAwful and Twitter.
    • What did we do wrong?Thursday, March 10, 2011Finally, a couple of things we did wrong.
    • Thursday, March 10, 2011Finally, a couple of things we did wrong.The first thing we did was make a $15 reward where backers needed to add $5 in shipping.This frightened and confused people and it was a horrible mistake. We’re still sorting thisout.STRONG ADVICE: For the love of god - build shipping into the reward cost.
    • Thursday, March 10, 2011Second, plan for every possibility. We thought a lot about what we would do if the projectfailed, but we didn’t even entertain the possibility that it would be really successful. As aresult, we lost weeks of time as we had to scramble to find new printers and improve thequality of the game.
    • is amazing.Thursday, March 10, 2011Our best guess is that about half of our backers found us through the Kickstarter ecosystem- that’s not something we planned for, and it was a great surprise.
    • www.CardsAgainstHumanity.comThursday, March 10, 2011Thanks, and you can learn more at www.CardsAgainstHumanity.com!