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Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
Social Media Possibilities for Public Health
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Social Media Possibilities for Public Health

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  • 1. Social Media in Public Health
    By Maureen Donnellan
    Your Community Strategy
    Strategic Advisers LLC
    Healthcare IS Community.
  • 2. Social Media and Public Health
    Data and Trends
    Who’s Doing It
    Obstacles and Issues of Concern - Why Social Media Plans Fail
    Building the system that will give you the results you want.
    Weaving Your Social Network into Public Relations
    Audiences
    Advocating for your Constituents
    Healthcare Reform and Opportunities to Serve
    e.g., Immunizations
  • 3. In 2009, a total of 58% of Internet users reported searching for health information online.
    Although people may prefer to go to their clinicians first, they have reported that they actually go online first for health information because it is so convenient.
  • 4. Looking for health information is the third most popular online activity measured in Pew Internet surveys.
    In 2010, 8 in 10 internet users looked online for health information, making it the third most popular online pursuit among all those tracked by the Pew Internet Project, following email and using a search engine. 
  • 5.
  • 6. 64% of adults living with at least one chronic condition have internet access, compared with 81% of adults who report no chronic conditions. Yet once online, 83% of internet users living with chronic conditions say they look online for health information, compared with 77% of internet users living with no such conditions. Indeed, internet users living with chronic conditions are keen to gather health information online, particularly about specific diseases, treatments, health insurance, and drug safety or recalls. They outpace or match other internet users on nearly every topic.
  • 7.
  • 8.
  • 9.
  • 10.
  • 11.
  • 12.
  • 13.
  • 14.
  • 15.
  • 16.
  • 17.
  • 18. Issues of Concern
    Risk Management and Social Media Policy
    Why Aren’t More Primary Care Providers Using Social Media?
    “ I do not think social media, especially healthcare social media, is the best avenue to interact with patients. It’s simply too risky on too many levels.”Doctors And Social Media: To Interact With Colleagues Or Influence Patient Care?
    August 15th, 2010 by DrWes in Better Health
  • 19. Issues of Concern
    Risk Management and Social Media Policy
    What keeps medical executives up at night?
    1) transparency
    2) time
    3) HIPAA
    4) liability
    How to Address It
    Transparency is required for authenticity.
    Find people that do have the time.
    Clear Social networking policy
    Education and policy.
  • 20. Issues of Concern
    Risk Management and Social Media Policy
    Discussion of patient non-specific issues is encouraged. 
    Any attempt at patient-initiated discussion of specific medical issues is discouraged and immediately goes offline and onto the EMR for issues of record, liability and safety.
    Doctor-patient dialog surrounding individual care should be limited to HIPAA compliant networks that integrate with the EMR. 
  • 21. http://www.healthcareitnews.com
    Currently only 10.3% of hospitals are engaged in social media.
    Analysts say they will account for the greatest growth in social media by 2014.
  • 22. Data and Trends
    Who’s Doing It?
    Some of Greater Cincinnati’s Healthcare Organizations using Social Media as of Feb. 4, 2011
  • 23. “Patients with the strongest relationships to specific primary care physicians were also more likely to receive recommended tests and preventive care.”
    Massachusetts General Hospital Research Study
  • 24. Journal of Medical Internet Research
    Thomas J. Moore, MD, Boston University Medical Center
    “We have found that an online program that provides weekly educational information, motivational messages and convenient ways for self-monitoring can lead not just to significant weight loss but also to reduction in blood pressure and to healthier dietary habits.”
    Nielsen Online By Melissa Davies, Healthcare Research Director, Healthcare
    “39% of patients already use online support groups to discuss medications or treatments with other patients.”
  • 25. Coordinated care and population management
    September 08, 2010 | Peter A. McClenne
    Patient access to health information via social media channels is rising at a torrid pace – introducing an invaluable opportunity for providers to include patients as critical members of the care team.
    Michael Christopher Gibbons, MD, MPH
    The Ability of Health IT to connect patients to providers and healthcare systems may help them improve care processes and outcomes by learning from large groups of patients.
    Health IT may offer significant new promise for addressing healthcare disparities by improving the availability, appropriateness, and efficacy of patient health education.
  • 26. A PATIENT’S PERSPECTIVE ON SOCIAL MEDIA
    I can read thousands of blog posts written by people from all walks of life, all living with type 1 diabetes.
    I can find connections. I can find people who understand exactly what I’m going through.
    I don’t feel so alone or isolated. In fact I often feel inspired and empowered by what I’ve seen.
    Social media has helped me be a healthier person by showing me real-life examples of others living with diabetes.
    Unfiltered and unafraid, these people are sharing their stories. I hear first hand about situations they have experienced, and I can share in their successes and challenges.
    Blog Post by Scott Johnson
    September 24, 2010
    Type I Diabetes patient
    Mayo Clinic
  • 27. More access to Information
    Improved Compliance
    Deeper Relationships
    Reduced Disparity
    Better Outcomes
    Cost Effectiveness
    …Better Health
  • 28. Why Social Media Plans Fail
    In 2008, Adam Sarner, an analyst with market research firm Gartner, projected that over 75 percent of Fortune 1000 companies with Web sites had undertaken some kind of online social-networking initiative for marketing or customer relations purposes.
    He added in an interview with CNET News, 50 percent of those campaigns were classified as failures.
    http://news.cnet.com/8301-13577_3-10058509-36.html#ixzz112Vy7VuD
  • 29. Why Social Media Plans Fail
    HIPAA and concerns with privacy are not necessarily the reasons social media in healthcare fails:
    The most common reasons that social media fails to conjure up success in any industry:
    • Lack of a strategic plan- No clear objectives- Failure to Engage
    • 30. No measurement – no outcome
  • Why Social Media Plans Fail
    Lack of a Strategic Plan
    Create social media tactics that fit into your existing strategic plan and enhance your current marketing and customer relations strategies.
    Identify clear roles and responsibilities for new work that bridges across traditional divisions of labor, and account for interdepartmental workflows required for social media collaboration.
    Aim for simple objective, create clear targets and benchmarks, and choose the appropriate measuring tools that will allow you to effectively adapt.
    Build upfront consensus on the definition of success (and failure).
    Stay mindful of the industrial and competitive landscape.
    Engage the right people to execute.
  • 31. Build the system that will give you the results you want.
    Objectives - Start with the end in mind.
    1. Jeff Livingston, MD, who practices at MacArthur OB/GYN, in Irving, Tex, said initially his objective in using social media was to connect with teens in a way that they were familiar with in order to talk about preventing teen pregnancy. Now he says social media has helped the practice to better connect with the community.
     2. According to UNC Health Care, a not-for-profit integrated healthcare system owned by the State of North Carolina and based in Chapel Hill, their intention for using social media was "to create an open dialog with the community about UNC Health Care."
    Advocacy
    Support Groups
    Online Resources
    Combat Misinformation
    Disease Management
    Research
    Feedback
    Pubic Relations
  • 32. Build the system that will give you the results you want.
  • 33. Build the system that will give you the results you want.
    One Objective at a Time
  • 34. Build the system that will give you the results you want.
    Risk Management
    All policies in place before launch of social media campaign.
    Outcome-Based Strategic Planning
    Pick Your Targets
    Measure
    Follow the Successes
    Redefine
    Repeated cycles of failure AND success.
  • 35. With a good plan in place you can have the luxury of implementing three of my favorite,
    common, but oft-ignored,
    pieces of expert advice:
    Be Fearless.
    Change Your Mind.
    Learn from Failure.
  • 36. Common Points of Social Media Failure
    • Inadequate Organizational Structure
    • 37. Lack of Clear Purpose
    • 38. Lack of Authenticity
    • 39. Failure to Engage
    • 40. Weak Architecture
    • 41. Failure to Fail…
  • ing mavens , promoters and membership
    Reality Strikes!
    Social Community Networking may require:
    New Organizational Structure
    New work flow processes
    “Customer Service is the new Marketing”
  • 42. Lack of Clear Purpose…
    Social Network
    Building Community
    Enhancing Relationships
    Improving Communications
    Caring for your Constituents
    “Social support…is influenced by social structural imperatives and becomes more than the sum of the individual links of networks in terms of social cohesion.Social cohesion can have a powerful effect on health…and has implications for improving the health of communities. “
    Michael Marmot and Richard Wilkinson
    Social Determinants of Health
    International Centre for Health and Society
  • 43. Lack of Authenticity
    Complaints and negative comments can be a huge opportunity to demonstrate patient/client advocacy. Don’t erase them.
    Be Open.
    Ask people to get involved.
    Admit mistakes and how to remedy them.
    “You are not in control… your customers, partners and employees are.” Charlene Li, Author of “Open Leadership: How Social Technology can transform the way you lead.”
    Open Leadership
    Skills Assessment Test
  • 44. Failure to Engage = Social Media Failure
    • Failure to post compelling, relevant content- Failure to be constituent focused
    • 45. Failure to reach out and form relationships
    • 46. Failure to make sure community members know they are heard by responding and following through.
    • 47. Failure to identify the place where “the rubber meets the road”.
  • 48. Know where the rubber meets the road.
  • 49.
  • 50. Where does the rubber meet the road for Hamilton County Public Health?
  • 51. Managing HCPH
    Programs and “Brands”
  • 52.
  • 53.
  • 54. Architecture
    How you engage will be determined by who you want/need to engage with.
    Architecture is audience driven.
  • 55. 49
    Social Network
    Corporate Website
  • 56. 50
    Evolution of the Social Corporate Website
    8. Seamless integration
    7. Social log-in triggers sharing
    6. Users stay on site with social log-in
    5. Aggregate discussion on site
    4. Brand integrated in social channels
    3. Link away but encourage sharing
    2. Link away with no strategy
    1. No social integration
  • 57.
  • 58. 52
    Corporate Website
    +
    Social Network
    EMR
  • 59. 53
    Evolution of the Social Corporate Website
    8. Seamless integration
    7. Social log-in triggers sharing
    6. Users stay on site with social log-in
    5. Aggregate discussion on site
    4. Brand integrated in social channels
    3. Link away but encourage sharing
    2. Link away with no strategy
    1. No social integration
  • 60.
  • 61. 55
    Website/Social Media Assimilation
  • 62. 56
    Evolution of the Social Corporate Website
    8. Seamless integration
    7. Social log-in triggers sharing
    6. Users stay on site with social log-in
    5. Aggregate discussion on site
    4. Brand integrated in social channels
    3. Link away but encourage sharing
    2. Link away with no strategy
    1. No social integration
  • 63. 57
  • 64. 58
    Evolution of the Social Corporate Website
    8. Seamless integration
    7. Social log-in triggers sharing
    6. Users stay on site with social log-in
    5. Aggregate discussion on site
    4. Brand integrated in social channels
    3. Link away but encourage sharing
    2. Link away with no strategy
    1. No social integration
  • 65. Architecture will also be determined by access requirements to tools and information…
  • 66. 60
    Corporate Website
    +
    Social Network
    EMR
  • 67. HCPH Social Media Strategy (Architecture)
    EHR
    Physicians
    Hospitals
    General Public
    Schools
    Restaurants
    Programs
    HHS CDC NIH CMS
    Environmental constituents
    Other Agencies
    Emergency Preparedness
    Architecture
    How you engage will be determined by who you want/need to engage with.
    Architecture is audience driven.
  • 68. Social Media “Page”
    v.
    Social Community Network
  • 69. Bring All Partners to the Table
    …Who Are You Really Serving?
    Health District staff have always practiced education over enforcement. In addition to required inspections, the Health District offers food safety training for licensed food service operators and retail food establishments to ensure that food service staff understand and follow proper food handling procedures.
    HCPH Clean Kitchen Award
  • 70. Social Media “Page”
    v.
    Social Community Network
  • 71. Assessment of Current Efforts
    You’ve started!
    Huge potential to:
    • reach constituents
    • 72. propel program success
    • 73. Innovate public relations and communications in public health
    • 74. New universe of customer service.
    Many Opportunities in current Program Plan of Work
    Probable Effects of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
  • 75. What Happens Next?
    Approve HCPH Social Media Policy
    Create an initial organizational Social Media Strategy
    Clarify Program Brand Strategy
    Launch Survey to identify target audiences and potential pilot projects.
    Choose Pilot.
    Execute.
    Measure and Revise.
    Revise organizational strategy.
    Move onto next project.
  • 76. Pilot Project Proposals
    We Thrive
    Refocus marketing and promotion on PHYSICIANS and SCHOOLS.
    Immunizations/Tuberculosis
    Create a health bridge between public health agencies and PHYSICIANS about immunization compliance.
    Link EHR, Primary Care Physicians, and the Public through physician promotion, events and social media networking.
  • 77. The last point of social media failure…
    …failing to Fail.
    “The strength of a relationship is not how perfect it is but how resiliently it deals with the unavoidable downs. With the advent of social technologies, there are new ways to form those bonds and relationships – but also the potential to amplify mistakes.”
    Innovation requires failure. So embarking into new territory requires preparation and planning for failure.
    NEXT STEP – Pilot Project

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