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Make Your Voice Heard: A Beginner's Guide to Lobbying (Advocating) to Congress for your Medical Practice
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Make Your Voice Heard: A Beginner's Guide to Lobbying (Advocating) to Congress for your Medical Practice

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Learn how to lobby (advocate) Congress for your physician (pediatrician, internist, family practitioner, gynecologist, etc), nurse, medical practice (primary care, specialty, dental, etc), and …

Learn how to lobby (advocate) Congress for your physician (pediatrician, internist, family practitioner, gynecologist, etc), nurse, medical practice (primary care, specialty, dental, etc), and hospital. In this video, you will learn the following:

What is Lobbying (advocacy)
The make up of the U.S. Congress
Identification of Congressional Healthcare Committees
Identification of Nurses and Physicians in Congress
The Anatomy of a Congressional Office
The Anatomy of a Congressional Committee
The Lobbying (Advocacy) Process


Please visit http://medicalaccessusa.com or http://medicalaccessforamerica.com for more information

Published in: Health & Medicine

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Transcript

  • 1. Make Your Voice Heard! A Beginner’s Guide to Communicating With the People Who Impact Your Practice February 27, 2014
  • 2. What is Advocacy? • The act of pleading, supporting, or recommending. (dictionary.com) • Apolitical process by an individual or group which aims to influence public policy and resource allocation decisions within political, economic, social systems, and institutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • 3. What Should You Advocate For? What is affecting your practice?       SGR Repeal (“Doc Fix”) Telemedicine ICD-10 Repeal/Delay Trauma Care Newborn Screenings Long Term Care Insurance
  • 4. Places to Advocate  City Councils  State Legislatures  Congress  Federal Government
  • 5. U. S. Congress
  • 6. Congressional Healthcare Committees U.S. House Appropriations Ways and Means Energy and Commerce – http://energycommerce.house.gov/ U.S. Senate Appropriations Finance HELP http://www.help.senate.gov/
  • 7. Know the Healthcare Professionals in the House NURSES IN THE HOUSE Diane Black Karen Bass Ann Buerkle Lois Capps Renee Ellmers Berniece Johnson Carolyn McCarthy R D R R D D D TN CA NY CA NC TX NY
  • 8. Know the Healthcare Professionals in the House PHYSICIANS IN THE HOUSE Donna Christensen D VI Ami Bera D CA Jim McDermott D WA Charles Boustany R LA Paul Broun R GA Larry Buschon R IN Michael Burgess R TX Bill Cassidy R LA Emergency Med. Internal Medicine Psychiatry Cardiothoracic Surg. Family Practice Thoracic Surgery OB/GYN Gastroenterology
  • 9. Know the Healthcare Professionals in the House PHYSICIANS IN THE HOUSE Dan Benishek R MI Scott Desjarlais R TN John Fleming R LA Phil Gingrey R GA Andy Harris R MD Nan Hayworth R NY Joe Heck R NV Tom Price R GA Phil Roe R TN General Surgery Family Practice Family Practice OB/GYN Anesthesiology Ophthalmology Emergency Med. Orthopedic Surg. OB/GYN
  • 10. Know the Healthcare Professionals in the Senate Tom Coburn, MD Family Practice (R-OK) John Barrasso, MD Orthopedic Surgeon (R-WY) Rand Paul, MD halmologist (R-KY) Opht
  • 11. Anatomy of a Congressional Office  Chief of Staff  Legislative Director  Legislative Assistants  Legislative Correspondents  Communication Director  Staff Assistants
  • 12. Anatomy of a Congressional Committee Each committee has different staff position titles. Most common titles for all committees are: Staff Director, Legislative Director, Chief Counsel, Communications Director, Clerk, Director of IT Example - U.S. Senate HELP Committee  Staff Director for Health  Director of Health Policy  Health Counsel  Professional Staff  Research Assistant  Staff Assistant
  • 13. Key Staffers – People to Advocate In the Congressional Office Legislative Assistants – draft small bills, resolutions, amendments. Have ear of the person (representative or senator) they work for. In the Congressional Committee Research Assistant/ Professional Staff - draft legislation, amendments. Have ear of the Committee members.
  • 14. The Advocacy Process 1. Identify your issue 2. Research your issue does it have any current pending legislation associated with it? 3. Contact Congress
  • 15. Identifying Issues Committee websites -Energy and Commerce – http://energycommerce.house.gov/ -HELP http://www.help.senate.gov/ Professional organizations -AMA, MGMA, ACHE -Professional Societies Congress.gov
  • 16. The Advocacy Process – Research
  • 17. The Advocacy Process – Research
  • 18. The Advocacy Process – Research
  • 19. The Advocacy Process – Contacting Congress http://www.opencongress.org/people/zipcodelookup Step 1- Write letter and an e-mail to your congressman/senator. Wait 1-2 weeks for a response. Step 2- Call the office of your congressman/senator. The person who answers is a staff assistant. Tell the staff assistant you wish for congressman/senator to support or not support a certain piece of legislation.
  • 20. The Advocacy Process – Contacting Congress Step 3- Ask to have the voicemail of the legislative assistant who handles health policy. Be polite! When legislative assistant replies back to you, ask to set up a time to further speak with them. Step 4- When meeting with legislative assistant, get very specific about your issue.
  • 21. The Advocacy Process – Contacting Congress Step 5- If there is legislation regarding your issue, encourage legislative assistant to have congressman/senator support it. If no legislation, encourage legislative assistant to have congressman/senator introduce legislation on your issue. Step 6- Thank legislative assistant for their time. Hand write or e-mail a thank you letter.
  • 22. Successful Advocacy Example
  • 23. QUESTIONS?
  • 24. For More Information: Mary Pat Whaley, FACMPE, CPC Manage My Practice http://www.managemypractice.com Email: marypat@managemypractice.com (919) 370.0504 Matthew D. Taber, MS Medical Access Corporation of America http://www.medicalaccessusa.com/ E-mail: mdtaber@me.com (615) 669.8347