Workplay: The gamified future of agile development (Agile India 2012)

  • 3,111 views
Uploaded on

Presentation slides for talk-workshop that I gave at Agile India 2012 conference, Feb. 17-19, 2012. http://agile2012.in/

Presentation slides for talk-workshop that I gave at Agile India 2012 conference, Feb. 17-19, 2012. http://agile2012.in/

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
3,111
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6

Actions

Shares
Downloads
125
Comments
0
Likes
10

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Jane McGonigal provoked an interesting discussion with her book "Reality Is Broken:. Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World" Agile teams experience many of the aspects of the gameplay benefits that McGonigal talks about: flow (from feedback), and happiness autotelic reward from working with others. This session explores the ways in Which agile development delivers to the four intrinsic rewards its Practitioners - satisfying work, experience of being successful, social connection and meaning - and looks into ways in Which We can design our work to further bridge the divide between games and reality.ChallengeHow do we "fix reality," as McGonigal Proposes? Agile teams are in a unique, leading position to do it, since they are already experiencing in many ways the characteristics of gameplay in everyday work. This talk will challenge the audience to consider how to leverage agile teams to make more successful and more satisfied workers.
  • Rajesh in Bangalorecomes into work and logs into his computer. He checks his Spacebook page, which looks a lot like Facebook, except that it contains people he works with, plus some other stuff, like missions his team went on yesterday and a list of missions that they might choose today. He grins proudly when he sees that SpiderEye, who is really Cornel from the Chicago-based part of his team, gave him – or rather Star Pilgrim, his avatar, the coveted golden helmet award from their mission yesterday in which they spanned two planets with a fuel-service pipeline, which was really and end-to-end continuous-deployment pipeline which will allow push-button releases for his real-life customer. Speaking of, he sees that Vladdix, that customer, has commissioned a raid on some rogue entities in another system, worth 5000 interplanetary dollars. He’ll join up with Larma at the Bangalore office in a few minutes to take care of things. In the course of their pairing, they encounter some crazy problems, so they bring in a teammate who is a level 5 pilot, who steers them in the right direction. They break a few things (tests), but ultimately prevail and both level up to 3 and share the 5000-dollar bounty with the team.
  • Continuous integrationContinuous delivery
  • GamificationAkaGamefulImmersive gamingfun= learning (RafKoster)Fun is just another word for learning.
  • This is not my unique idea.I am standing on the shoulders of others who have gone before.Sebastian DeterdingDoc ListLewis Chessmen 12th-century chess pieces
  • We are going to work together in guilds to …GOAL: Create and share our top ideas with the world (via twitter)Players work in teamsPlayers post ideasEveryone on team logs in as agileplay1 or on personal accountTo get past first round, you have to have at least one idea retweeted. Round two is two retweets...Players vote on ideas by retweetingTag with #agileplay
  • For Level, use retrospectives:0-4: 15-10: 211-25: 326-50: 450+: 5Anyone want to share:Pip (a.k.a. Matt Philip)Level-6 agile trainer-coachThoughtWorks Studios guild (Greatness by association: Jim Highsmith and Martin Fowler, two signers of manifesto, in my extended guild)- Role in organization?Favorite game? Why?Why you’re here?Now get together in new guildsYour guild needs to have at least one level-one person and one higherNeeds to have people from multiple guilds
  • QUESTION: What do you think the average age of your teams is?What is the average age of computer gamers? 35Increasingly, the younger population is going to be exceptionally good at gaming“#winning is the slogan of generation y” By age 21, average young american has more than 10,000 hours playing computer/video gamesThis means they are very good at collaborating (cooperating, coordinating, cocreating)Software development is fundamentally a generative, or creative, activityIncreasing salary and titling is exhaustible; intrinsic rewards are not.Play will enter workplace; choose to take control and purposefully construct play so it’s win-winGood game leaders: focused on executionDevelops employees: “Now I know what to do (next)”Teamwork/accountability: Anyone ever have people come late to their standups? How often have you been late to a raid with your guild? Play offers group members opportunity to persuade each other that they belong together.
  • Games allow us to Align the twoOpportunity to do something that matters right nowClear instructionsTuned to moment-by-moment capabilitiesExample of Halo lunchhour
  • Goal: Provides sense of purposeRules: limit ways to achieve goal > Unleash creativity and foster strategic thinkingFeedback system: Tells players how close they are to achieving goal (points, score, levels, progress bar); game is over when…Voluntary: all participants knowingly and willingly accepts goal, rules, feedback. Establishes common ground. So if you don’t want to play today, you can observe – no problem.Bernard Suits: “Playing a game is the voluntary attempt to overcome unnecessary obstacles.”Tom Grant, Forrester Research:Structured: Rules but often no winnersPurposeful: Definite outcomeTime-bound: By definition, a time-boxed exerciseParticipatory: Success depends on everyone participatingEgalitarian: Everyone has an equal opportunity to participate
  • Self-representation with avatars3D environmentsNarrative contextFeedback: Automate, make micro, “feedback changes behavior”Reputation, Ranks and Levels: Badges, digital reputations, like eBay sellers, hotels, Facebook devs’ karma pointsMarketplace and economics: transparency of interactions, virtual currency; story points take on new meaning in an economy (for team AND customer); facilitate decision-making under conditions of scarcity; today we have a disconnect between customer’s value and team’s cost/time/effort.Competition under explicit, enforced rules: Objective rules, no “political” stuff in office needed to get aheadTeams: I win when we winParallel, reconfigurable communication systems: Distributed teams can communicate like raiding guilds (headsets, IM, etc)Time pressure: Clocks create excitement
  • Play is substantial force in how people think, feel, learn and work in groupsScholarly and scientific work to reassess relationship between work and playConvergence of work and play through media technologyDistinction between work and play is increasingly going to blurAgile already has a headstart
  • This is to analyze parallel experiences in your personal worlds of work and playPair up within your guild.On a piece of paper, make a table with two columns: Play and WorkList as many of your experiences that are common to both (e.g., meeting new coworkers, meeting new guild members)
  • How many of you are typically bored at work? Typically anxious or frustrated?Flow is the happy state of mind and feeling of complete engagement in a creative or playful activityAn optimal experience in which our abilities are matched to the challengeEnjoyment comes not what you do but how you do itCsikszentmihalyi showed how, in order to achieve or be in flow, our skills need to align with the challenge. We might start at A1, then move either to A2 if our skills improve or A3 if the challenge increases too quickly. Goal is to get to A4.In doing so, both the challenge and our skills have increased. Even so, A4 is not a stable state either.Dynamic nature of flow ->> growth and discovery
  • Cheek-sent-me-highClear goals at every step: Obvious what needs to be done at each step. Opposite of contradictory or ambiguous demands at work.Immediate feedback: Every small behavior connects with a goal. Centers on corrective action.Balance between challenge and skill: not beneath or beyond a person’s abilityMerger of action and awareness: coupling between thinking and behaviorExclusion of distractions: Concentration on the momentNo worries about failure: Not dismissing failure as unimportant but not in immediate thinkingAbsence of self-consciousness: think avatarsTime becomes distorted: Real time is separate from flow of time in games.The experience is an end in itself: What we really seek is state of flow (think unwinnable games like tetris)
  • Csikszentmihalyi’s steps to flowYou don’t have to gamify to get benefits
  • As humans we crave these. Essential to our happinessScientifically provenContra: Salary and social statusGrant: Our brains are wired for intrinsic motivation- If (figure out puzzle), then (release pleasure-creating chemicals called opinoids)
  • Pick a simple, mundane task that you don’t experience flow with today and plot it on the flow diagram. E.g., time sheet entry. How might you gamify it?
  • Future of work is more about engaging workers than commanding them. Agile teams already do this.Manifesto:Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done.= autotelic = provides intrinsic rewardsHelps answer question of how to engage distributed workersAllows organizations to decentralizeGuild concept: roles and responsibilities are both assigned and assumedShared concentrationSynchronized engagementMutual regardCollective commitmentReciprocal rewardsCollaborating via whole-team approachRecruit and hire for collaborationTeams convert tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge through pairing and cross-functional boundary crossingWe vs. I mentalityComplimentary skills that work when people pair and work in cross-functional environment (game characters have their own specialities that benefit others when used for a common cause, like healers in a raid)You need all classes in your guild to accomplish a questParticipatory: Success depends on everyone participating
  • We already break our work into smaller, manageable pieces, that also have a narrative componentStories: Are satisfying work (clearly defined, demanding activities)Koster: We learn through stories, we become who we are through storiesTime-boxed, on the clock
  • Pep playing Dungeon: “It’s pleasant to see all of the RIP stones [work we accomplished] – I’m so proud of us!”Stories are already small. But some can take two days or more. We should help visualize the tedious steps in-between, like testsKanban has its own, tunable rules and explicit policiesCards, card wallBuild monitor/lightMake smaller bits of accomplishment visible (not just stories)Kanban has explict process rulesTDD has rulesSolving mental puzzles is one of the oldest forms of enjoyable activityvoluntary attempt to overcome unnecessary obstacles.
  • Flow depends on feedback:Customer: Demos, planningTeam: RetrospectivesSystem (tests, CI)(process): Kanban, visible workNeurochemicals released when:We accomplish something very difficultMake someone laugh or smile, or do it ourselvesCoordinate physical movements with othersExpose ourselves to ambiguous visual stimulus (like wrapped present or … tests!)Failure feedback should be fun (e.g., Rock Band)Realtime feedback -> learning environmentLearning -> Optimism -> Likelihood of seeking stronger relationshipsThink of this in reverse: Team with no optimism turns inward
  • quickly list as many forms of feedback as possible that they get on their teams.brainstorm ways to intensify those feedback momentsFailure feedback (Epic fail!)Success criteria (done)MicrorewardsTie success back to the actual users of the software (connect where there is disconnect)Use retrospectives to help failure (even spectacular) be rewarding and empoweringWe must learn from our mistakes for that to happen
  • Highly coordinated prosocial behaviorNo one forces gamers to play by the rules, concentrate, do their best, stay in the game, etc.As a result, we shouldn’t force pairing but entice itReseach: “Social rewards are intensified by things like eye contact and touch.”Asynchronous social interaction: Farmville, Lexulous are like how distributed teams work The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation.Total Engagement: “Game environments feel more social than a typical workplace. All aspects of planning, action, rehearsal and evaluation … involve conversations.”
  • For all the ways in which Agile makes work better, it hasn’t yet answered all our problems.Our challenge is to change things to avoid consequences of when:People don’t have control over their work, especially timeOrganizational purpose is not clear and inspiring Individual goals are uncertainFeedback is missing or confusingMismatch between skills and challenges (either too easy or too hard)
  • Halo’s “10 billion kills” campaignNeed to reward people/inspire beyond even team success -> organizational -> Kaizen eventWhy not have everyone in the company participate: Financial, HR, legal. See how we connect in the bigger pictureValue != meaningKey is to align value (as in organizational) and meaning“Every single kill in Halo campaign has meaning” What can we do to change our work environment so that everything we do has meaning in the bigger picture?We don’t need to contribute to something of value; just be able to contribute at allWe need to be able to see the impact of our actions: Does what I do matter at all?Customer connection is important here: Let dev team see how their software is being used in reality3 aspects of epic:Epic contexts for actionImmerse us in epic environmentsEngage us in epic projectsWe sometimes work on epic-sized projects, but why are so many often lame?Have to connect our individual actions with the bigger pictureEfforts with others are not connectedWhat if lots of people got to see demos?Demos that benefit others, like collaborative creation systems in which gamers create worlds to share with othersMembership in guilds
  • “What’s your story?”Divide into groups of 4-5.Decide what kind of game narrative suits your work.Prototype: Adventure, discoveryMaintenance: Search and destroy (bugs)Brainstorm practical ways you could gamify your work todayEach group will share
  • Gamify parts of what you already do, like inceptionDecide to design: Games are designed, not like many jobs, which are just left to happenMay need to add or change some roles:Game designerDKP (“dragon-kill points”) manager or flow experience managerGuild leaderIntroducing a synthetic currency and economy can also involve the customer in the game experienceHelps clarify successIdentify equipment for quest (special training, hardware)Come up with a narrative. Can be as simple as your company’s story and value proposition
  • Identify equipment for quest (special training, hardware)Additional activity at release planning: have team set goals and reward with pointsConvert points into both individual and team goodies , both real life and virtualGuild leader: “Change the game [environment], not the people” –Total Engagement, p. 138Guild leaders: both in-team, cross-functional guilds and function-based guildsGuild leader activities:Align mentors with protegesIdentify guild quests (possibly secret): Goal is to secretly automate some of the toughest functional test (test raid)Could be function-based, like QAs
  • See bugs as bosses, or things to jointly conquerShare experiences with other guildsRedo your intrant/wiki to be more like a guild web site: Dynamic, list of recent raids, rosters of avatars, tipsEnhance the media experience as much as possible (audio-video); prefer pictures to wordsHackathons: Structured like games, in which non-monetary prizes are awarded, objectives are clearHire people who play gamesReeves and Reed’s suggested sequence:Build your own conceptual map linking games and workStudy what others are doing with work+gamesExperiment with bite-sized use cases that address real pain pointsCommit to a focused application of principlesMeasure the impact (to enterprise and individuals)Evolve better an more comprehensive systems
  • Medals: Don’t need to represent big things:Pairing partnerMaster testerPipe layerStages of craftsmanshipMentoring lineageGuild membersPast guilds and memorable “raids”Some teams already do story mapping Jeff Patton suggests “detective approach”Rewards are key component of successful game activity (if activity doesn't give quantifiable reward, gamers will consider it irrelevant)
  • Flow experience supported by idea of sustainable pace: Idea of challenge aligning with skill (work that’s neither too easy nor too hard)Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely.Increase intrinsic rewardsUse Avatars and badges (Pair-partner, master tester, pipelayer)Move from flow (in-moment) to longer lastingWorld of Warcraft’s success: “Feeling of blissful productivity”Your primary job is self-improvementDo we as agilists see our job as getting better all the time?In WoW, players always have something to doE.g., always different ways to improve your avatarVirtuous cycle of productivity: the more challenging the work, the more motivated you are to do it, the more points you earn…Keeps balance between too easy and too hard tasksMicrorewardskaizen“Zero unemployment in WoW.” – Edward CastronovaDesigned so that there is always something to do – we should design our work that way, tooThe possibility of reaching the highest level is simply justification for what they love most: getting betterThe key then is to give people feedback – all the time – on their improvementIntersection with Software Craftsmanship movement – guild modelGradual enhancement of reputation, which can’t be gamed (or proven by certification)
  • Only through freely chosen discipline can life be enjoyed. This is partly why you should not force anyone to gamfy his team or be on a team that is gamified. It also points toward the kind of people you do want to form a gamified team: those who are at some level willng to improve their craft.Kvell+Naches: Positive emotions from interpersonal interactionsKvell: the emotion you get when you brag about someone that you mentor (signals that you are valuable)Naches: the feeling you get when someone you mentor succeedsMuch of technical excellence is essentially the discovery of “secrets” Craftsmanship manifesto emphasizes:well-crafted softwaresteadily adding valuecommunity of professionalsproductive partnerships
  • “In the corporate world, reattempting is hard”Like agile adoptions, you might do more harm than good if you poorly implementPotential for addictive behaviorsCould depersonalize rather than personalizeEthical violations (electtronic surveillance)Cultural barriers and differences: Some cultures may be less able to gamifyGender and personality preferences in games: No one game can please allMisusing metricsGame attitudes may not square with realities of businessCheating behaviors
  • “Slowly, carefully, iteratively”Let teams design their ownRetrospect and adaptHelps if you have someone who has designed a game beforeKeep it voluntary: Invite teams to play – do not mandate itSense of control over one's actions: empower teams to make their own meaningful decisions. Allow them to fail.“Meaning, autonomy, mastery”Peer-generated badges as reputationFocus on intrinsic: Craftsmanship approach (guilds, apprentice)Identify cultural obstacles to gamiification in your org.
  • Challenges - sustaining flow. E.g., shushwap native tribe that would move to new land every 25-30 years in conscious effort to provide challenge. If your team has been together so long that the domain is no longer a challenge, move.Activity: plot the different challenges in your team on cheek's skill-challenge matrix to identify tasks that provide flow and where others do not
  • Play: Catalyst for work, Serious concept – not: Opposite of workFlow: (different from Kanban flow) kind of happiness; “the satisfying, exhilarating feeling of creative accomplishment and heightened functioning.” “(Czikszentmihalyi)MMORPG: Massive multiplayer online role-playing gameFiero: Italian word for pride. Feeling when you triumph over adversityShared intentionality: the ability to participate with others in collaborative activities with shared goals and intentions (Tomasello)PQ: extraordinary collaborators have no qualms about reaching out to others to ask for participation and are likely to reply to others (form of social capital).These are the people we want/need in future teamsCollaboration radar: 6th sense, peripheral awareness of what others are doing and who would be good for a particular missionEnhanced by ambient information systems, like TwitterEmergensight: ability to thrive in a chaotic, complex collaborative environment
  • Failure feedback (Epic fail!)Success criteria (done)MicrorewardsFailure feedback should be fun (e.g., Rock Band)Realtime feedback -> learning environmentLearning -> Optimism -> Likelihood of seeking stronger relationshipsThink of this in reverse: Team with no optimism turns inwardTie success back to the actual users of the software (connect where there is disconnect)Use retrospectives to help failure (even spectacular) be rewarding and empoweringWe must learn from our mistakes for that to happenAnyone ever celebrate failure at a retrospective?Ball-catch-fail game (pretend to throw and catch imaginary ball, fail horribly, cheer massively)EXAMPLETeam task is to built end-to-end deployment pipeline with automated toolsFor every stage of the pipeline, the team members get points or visible progressAfter it’s built, they get points for each amount of material that flows through it
  • Marketplace dynamics: Planning poker, planning with scarce resourcesFace-to-face communication, Pairing: interactions with others (literally happier), social connection (shared experiences)Software development is a “chaotic story”Self-organizing = autotelic = provides intrinsic rewards3 kinds of feedback (Provides “flow”)Stories: Are satisfying work (clearly defined, demanding activities)Experience of being successful (feels like we’re improving, through retros, kaizen)Provides meaning (something bigger than ourselves)Visible progressChaotic story: no single means of consuming the game story; more like jigsaw puzzle, which forces players to actively make sense of the game content for themselves and for each other, using collective intelligence skills and collaborative authoring platforms: piece together the final storyFlow depends on feedback:System (tests, CI)Customer: Demos, planningTeam: Retrospectives(process): Kanban, visible workAutotelic: self-goal, self-motivated, self-rewarding activityNeurochemicals released when:We accomplish something very difficultMake someone laugh or smile, or do it ourselvesCoordinate physical movements with othersExpose ourselves to ambiguous visual stimulous (like wrapped present or … tests!)

Transcript

  • 1. Workplay: The gamified future of agile development #agileindia2012 #agileplay
  • 2. WHAT IF WORK WERE MORE LIKE A GAME?Gamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 3. What’s next for agile?2001-2012 2012+ Continuous integration, Continuous play delivery, design, feedbackGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 4. So what is gamification? Gamification is integrating game thinking and design into activities to increase engagement, learning and fun.Gamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 5. Where did it come from?Gamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 6. So what is this talk about (and not about)? Applying gameGamified services thinking to daily work(e.g., Foursquare) Experience report Thinking about how we can gamify agile teams Using games solely for Marketing training or planning and loyalty Discussing how (a.k.a. serious games) programs agile teams have a head start A mission of our own!Gamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 7. Our mission (if youchoose to accept it!)Gamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 8. Our mission today Make it through without falling asleep (mm, lunch…) Explore the new world of gamification Overcome some obstacles along the way Conquer this quest with experience and ideas to take on our next questGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 9. Create a characterGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 10. Create a character Player name (you) Character name (made up) Class (Java Warrior, Product Wizard, etc.) Level (agile experience) Guild (organization) Spells and special skills (exploratory-testing magic, analysis spell)Gamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 11. Why should we gamify work? Adapt work for incoming, younger workforce Intrinsic rewards are renewable resource Develop leadership in teams More-satisfying work = better productivity Develops people by pointing them forward to clear goals Fosters teamwork and accountability Key to greater innovation (through imagination)Gamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 12. Gamification aligns personal and organizational Personal OrganizationalGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 13. Defining traits of a gameGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 14. Reeves and Reed’s 10 ingredients for games1. Self-representation with 6. Marketplace and avatars economics2. 3D environments 7. Competition under3. Narrative context explicit, enforced rules4. Feedback 8. Teams5. Reputation, Ranks and 9. Parallel, reconfigurable Levels communication systems 10. Time pressureGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 15. Is agile the key intersection? play work agileGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 16. Work-play mirrorGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 17. Csikszentmihalyi’s “flow channel”Gamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 18. Csikszentmihalyi’s 9 features of flow1. Clear goals at every step2. Immediate feedback3. Balance between challenge and skill4. Merger of action and awareness5. Exclusion of distractions6. No worries about failure7. Absence of self-consciousness8. Time becomes distorted9. The experience is an end in itselfGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 19. Steps to flow – and how agile can provide them Set an overall goal (and Business value < Release many realistic subgoals) < Feature < Story < Tests Find ways of measuring Tests, MMFs, cycle time progress of goals Concentrate on task and Refactor mercilessly, keep making finer incrementally develop, distinctions in challenges test-drive development Develop skills to meet Pair in everything (cross- challenge pair) Raise stakes if bored KaizenGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 20. Intrinsic rewards Satisfying work Experience (or at least the hope) of being successful Social connection MeaningGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 21. “Flow” chartGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 22. HOW AGILE IS LIKE A GAMEGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 23. Voluntary, participatory success Voluntary discipline Self-organizing teams Build teams around motivated individualsGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 24. Quest-like work Stories! Narratives SpikesGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 25. Visible progress and rules TDD (rules) Kanban (visual, limitations, explicit policies) Continuous-integration build monitors Card wall (visual)Gamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 26. Feedback Customer Team System ProcessGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 27. Intensify the feedbackGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 28. High levels of communication Realtime, face-to-face communication Pairing to solve problemsGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 29. Game dimensions “Get to the other side”: Complete the iteration, feature “Visit all the map”: Unlock “secrets” by technical discovery “time limits”: Velocity metrics, iteration time boxGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 30. CREATING CONTINUOUS PLAYGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 31. Something bigger than ourselves What is the organization about and where do we fit in? Working with distributed team membersGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 32. What’s your story?Gamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 33. Project inception Team members create characters, identify what they’ll need Game designer works with customer to create narrative Customer helps map out quests, assigns virtual monetary value Designer and customer determine what it means to win, rules, virtual currency and rewardsGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 34. Project initiation (iteration 0) Team members mini-quest for their equipment Game designer tells the team the narrative Team sets goals for first missions Guild leadershipGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 35. Develop and deliver Gamify small components to address pain points Hackathons and secret missions to destroy bug “bosses” Use retrospectives to “mod” the game Measure the impact Monitor flow experienceGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 36. Visualize progress Story mapping> quest maps Pairing charts > character profiles Build in clear rewardsGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 37. Leveling up as self-improvement Flow experience supported by sustainable pace Reflect recognition and reputation Encourage team members to view their job as self improvementGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 38. Software craftsmanship Craftsmanship over crap (Uncle Bob) Craftsmanship manifesto Apprentice > Journeyman > Master Kvell and nachesGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 39. ENDGAMEGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 40. Dangers You can’t just spawn a new project after failing Could depersonalize rather than personalize No one game can please all Gaming and misuse of metricsGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 41. How do we conquer this new quest? Take an agile approach (Increment, Iterate, Improve) Focus on the intrinsic first (extrinsic will come) Voluntary participation Give control and teams design their own games (and fail) Lightweight, both in implementation and tone (i.e., fun)Gamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 42. Final “boss”Gamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 43. Before your next quest…Books: Flow A Theory of Fun Total Engagement Reality is Broken GamestormingOther: http://www.delicious.com/matthew.philip/gamificationGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame
  • 44. gg mphilip@thoughtworks.com @mattphilipGamification > How agile is like a game > Creating continuous play > Endgame