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Lens Perspective

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  • Barry Lyndon (1975). Stanley Kubrick, director. The long-focal-length lens (85mm-500mm) makes subjects look closer together than they do in real life. Barry Lyndon, © 1975 Peregrine.
  • Sunset Boulevard (1950). Billy Wilder, director. The middle-focal-length lens (35mm-50mm) makes images correspond to our normal depth and perspective. Sunset Boulevard, © 1950 Paramount Pictures.
  • Transcript

    • 1. LENSPERSPECTIVE
    • 2. “Lens perspective refers to the way lensesrepresent space. Different kinds of lenseshave different effects on the way weperceive depth and dimensionality within animage. . . . Lenses are usually chosen forhow they represent space.” - Bruce Mamer, Film Production Technique: Creating the Accomplished Image (2008)
    • 3. WIDE - ANGLELENS
    • 4. The wide-angle lens elongates spaceand exaggerates distance. Days of Heaven (Malick, 1978)
    • 5. The wide-angle lens can make peopleseem dwarfed by their environment. The Piano (Campion, 1993)
    • 6. The wide-angle lens stretchesperspective. The Shining (Kubrick, 1980)
    • 7. The wide-angle lens can maintaindeep focus. Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941)
    • 8. The wide-angle lens can create afeeling of vast space. The Conversation (Coppola, 1974)
    • 9. The wide-angle lens at a low anglecreates a sense of cavernous space. Citizen Kane (Welles, 1941)
    • 10. The wide-angle lens distorts facesclose to the camera. Do the Right Thing (Lee, 1989)
    • 11. TELEPHOTOLENS
    • 12. The telephoto lens squashes spaceand compresses distance. Barry Lyndon (Kubrick, 1975)
    • 13. The telephoto lens brings people closerto the camera. The Conversation (Coppola, 1974)
    • 14. The telephoto lens can create a shallowdepth of field. Days of Heaven (Malick, 1978)
    • 15. The telephoto lens distorts movementtoward the camera. The Graduate (Nichols, 1967)
    • 16. NORMALLENS
    • 17. A normal lens represents space anddistance as they normally appear. Sunset Boulevard (Wilder, 1950)
    • 18. . . . Changing lenses for the amount ofinformation the lens gathers (its “field”) is only apartial use of a lens. Lenses have differentfeelings about them. Different lenses will tell astory differently. -Sidney Lumet, Making Movies (1996)