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48 Figure 41: Planned Private Cloud Offerings
49...
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Art Wittmann
InformationWeek Reports

2014 Private Cloud Survey

Art Wittmann ...
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SUMMARY

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EXECUTIVE

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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Th...
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InformationWeek Reports’
analysts arm business technology
decision-makers with real-wor...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

(Nearly) Zero To Private Cloud In Two Years
It’s be...
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FAST FACT

23%
of respondents to our
2014 Private Cloud
Survey say they’re not
pursuing...
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For most enterprises, DR can be done across
company-owned or blue-ch...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

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tions not supporting a cloud model, lack of
budget,...
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No Fear, No Loathing
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3.6
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Better average application performanc...
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FAST FACT

65%
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VMware products as part
of their private clouds...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

bringing IT staff skills up to snuff, and updating ...
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Figure 11

Private Cloud Issues
What are the main p...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Which technologies needed to be updated or replaced...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

in particular is being used less as part of a priva...
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19% have OpenStack in their plans. We suspect
that there are two groups in thi...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

vate cloud technology, you should feel assured that...
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APPENDIX

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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 15

T...
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Figure 16

Private Cloud Across Multiple Data Cente...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 17

Movement Among Data Center Locations
Doe...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 18

Private Cloud Requirement for New Applic...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 19

Required App-Level Features and Function...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 20

Dealing With Legacy Applications
How did...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 21

Approach Taken to Build a Private Cloud
...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 22

Acquiring Knowledgeable Staff
How did yo...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 23

Build vs. Bundle
Did your organization b...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 24

Private Cloud Vendors Used
Which vendors...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 25

Budget to Build a Private Cloud
Approxim...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 26

Budget to Maintain a Private Cloud
What ...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 27

Impact of Industry Standards on Product ...
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Figure 28

Use of Public Cloud Services
Does your o...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 29

Use of Hybrid Cloud Model
Does your orga...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 30

Reasons for Not Using a Public Cloud
Wha...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 31

Stage of Private Cloud Deployment
At wha...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 32

Steps Taken to Build a Private Cloud
Wha...
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Figure 33

Expected Private Cloud Timeline
How long...
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Figure 34

Expected Success of IT Goals
How success...
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Figure 35

Expected Success of Business and Process...
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Figure 36

Expected Challenges of Launching a Priva...
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R
45%

29%

21%

22%

Note: Three responses allowed
Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and...
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Figure 38

Necessary Tech Updates to Build a Privat...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 39

Importance of Private Cloud Features
Ple...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 40

Plans for Chargeback Use
Will your organ...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 41

Planned Private Cloud Offerings
Which ty...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 42

Planned Private Cloud Scope
Will your pr...
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2014 Private Cloud Survey

Figure 43

Planned Movement Among Data Center Locat...
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Figure 44

Planned Private Cloud Requirement for Ne...
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Figure 45

App-Level Feature and Function Requireme...
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Figure 46

Plan for Handling Legacy Applications
Ho...
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Figure 47

Planned Approach for Building a Private ...
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Figure 48

Strategy for Acquiring Knowledgeable Sta...
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Figure 49

Planned Approach for Private Cloud Purch...
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Figure 50

Planned Private Cloud Vendor Use
Which v...
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Figure 51

Estimated Budget to Build a Private Clou...
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Figure 52

Estimated Budget to Maintain a Private C...
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Figure 53

Impact of Industry Standards on Product ...
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Figure 54

Public Cloud Use
Does your organization ...
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Figure 55

Hybrid Cloud Use
Does your organization ...
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Figure 56

Reasons for Not Using or Phasing Out Pub...
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Figure 57

Job Title
Which of the following best de...
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Figure 58

Company Revenue
Which of the following d...
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2%

2%

5%

3%

Data: InformationWeek 2014 Private Cloud Survey of 242 business technology pr...
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  1. 1. Next reports rep or ts.informat ionweek.com Januar y 2014 $99 2014 Private Cloud Survey 53% brought their private clouds from concept to production in less than one year, and 60% extend Respondents are on a roll: their clouds across multiple data centers. But expertise is scarce, with 51% saying acquiring skilled employees is a roadblock. By Art Wittmann Report ID: R7591213
  2. 2. Previous Next CONTENTS reports TABLE OF reports.informationweek.com 4 5 6 7 9 11 14 16 18 22 68 Author’s Bio Executive Summary Research Synopsis (Nearly) Zero To Private Cloud In Two Years Resistance Is Futile? No Fear, No Loathing Private Cloud: The Last Nail In APM’s Coffin? Not All Smooth Sailing Vendor Blanket Bingo Appendix Related Reports Figures 7 Figure 1: Private Cloud Strategy 8 Figure 2: Approach to New Technology Adoption 9 Figure 3: Reasons for Not Adopting a Private Cloud 10 Figure 4: Reasons to Consider a Private Cloud 11 Figure 5: Perceived Private Cloud Issues 12 Figure 6: Success of Private Cloud 13 Figure 7: Private Cloud Timeline 14 Figure 8: Success in Meeting IT Goals 15 Figure 9: Success in Meeting Business and Process Goals 16 Figure 10: Challenges Encountered When Launching a Private Cloud 2014 Private Cloud Survey 17 Figure 11: Private Cloud Issues 18 Figure 12: Tech Updates Needed to Build a Private Cloud 19 Figure 13: Importance of Private Cloud Features 20 Figure 14: Use of Chargeback 22 Figure 15: Types of Private Clouds Offered 23 Figure 16: Private Cloud Across Multiple Data Centers 24 Figure 17: Movement Among Data Center Locations 25 Figure 18: Private Cloud Requirement for New Applications 26 Figure 19: Required App-Level Features and Functions 27 Figure 20: Dealing With Legacy Applications 28 Figure 21: Approach Taken to Build a Private Cloud 29 Figure 22: Acquiring Knowledgeable Staff 30 Figure 23: Build vs. Bundle 31 Figure 24: Private Cloud Vendors Used 32 Figure 25: Budget to Build a Private Cloud 33 Figure 26: Budget to Maintain a Private Cloud 34 Figure 27: Impact of Industry Standards on Product Selection 35 Figure 28: Use of Public Cloud Services 36 Figure 29: Use of Hybrid Cloud Model 37 Figure 30: Reasons for Not Using a Public Cloud 38 Figure 31: Stage of Private Cloud Deployment 39 Figure 32: Steps Taken to Build a Private Cloud 40 Figure 33: Expected Private Cloud Timeline 41 Figure 34: Expected Success of IT Goals 42 Figure 35: Expected Success of Business and Process Goals 43 Figure 36: Expected Challenges of Launching a Private Cloud 44 Figure 37: Potential Private Cloud Problems 45 Figure 38: Necessary Tech Updates to Build a Private Cloud 46 Figure 39: Importance of Private Cloud Features 47 Figure 40: Plans for Chargeback Use January 2014 2
  3. 3. Previous Next CONTENTS reports TABLE OF reports.informationweek.com 48 Figure 41: Planned Private Cloud Offerings 49 Figure 42: Planned Private Cloud Scope 50 Figure 43: Planned Movement Among Data Center Locations 51 Figure 44: Planned Private Cloud Requirement for New Apps 52 Figure 45: App-Level Feature and Function Requirements 53 Figure 46: Plan for Handling Legacy Applications 54 Figure 47: Planned Approach for Building a Private Cloud 55 Figure 48: Strategy for Acquiring Knowledgeable Staff 56 Figure 49: Planned Approach for Private Cloud Purchase 57 Figure 50: Planned Private Cloud Vendor Use 58 Figure 51: Estimated Budget to Build a Private Cloud 59 Figure 52: Estimated Budget to Maintain a Private Cloud 60 Figure 53: Impact of Industry Standards on Product Selection 61 Figure 54: Public Cloud Use 2014 Private Cloud Survey 62 Figure 55: Hybrid Cloud Use 63 Figure 56: Reasons for Not Using or Phasing Out Public Cloud 64 Figure 57: Job Title 65 Figure 58: Company Revenue 66 Figure 59: Industry 67 Figure 60: Company Size January 2014 3
  4. 4. Previous Next Table of Contents reports Art Wittmann InformationWeek Reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Art Wittmann is an independent IT analyst and writer with 30 years of experience in IT and IT journalism. Formerly, he was VP of InformationWeek Reports, and has served as editor of InformationWeek and editor in chief of Network Computing and IT Architect magazines. Prior to his time in business technology journalism, he worked as an IT director for a major university. Want More? Never Miss a Report! Follow reports.informationweek.com Follow © 2014 InformationWeek, Reproduction Prohibited January 2014 4
  5. 5. Previous Next Table of Contents SUMMARY reports EXECUTIVE reports.informationweek.com 2014 Private Cloud Survey The results of our InformationWeek 2014 Private Cloud Survey are eye-opening. All 242 respondents hail from organizations with 50 or more employees and screened into the survey by indicating involvement with managing, purchasing, advising on, or implementing datacenter technologies, and we were able to trend from our April 2012 poll. So what’s so surprising? The percentage reporting that they have functional private clouds more than doubled, from 21% to 47%. And we saw very little falloff of those who told us in 2012 that they were on the private cloud path. Other stats: >> 36% of private cloud users rate their projects as somewhat successful versus 64% saying they’ve achieved complete (17%) or very good (47%) success. There were zero failures in the bunch. >> 33% of cloud adopters used internal expertise to build their systems, and 76% have invested in training employees in private cloud technologies. >> 26% of those not using private clouds blame applications that won’t work in the model, yet 61% of nonadopters say a private cloud could yield significant operational cost savings. >> 19% purchased a preconfigured bundle, like Vblocks, while 55% built their clouds from individual products and suites. Our advice: Get a private cloud plan in place, and vet all technology purchases, from storage to public cloud services to networked applications, based on how well they support your plan. In this report we: >> Examine the business and technology trends pushing the move to private cloud >> Provide recommendations on building, and more effectively using, a private cloud that can adapt to explosive growth, changing infrastructure technology, and a dynamic mix of public and private services Respondent breakdown: 31% have 5,000 or more employees; 24% are over 10,000. Financial services, government, education, and healthcare/medical are well-represented, and 47% are IT director/manager or IT executive management (C-level/VP) level. January 2014 5
  6. 6. Previous Next Table of Contents InformationWeek Reports’ analysts arm business technology decision-makers with real-world perspective based on qualitative and quantitative research, business and technology assessment and planning tools, and adoption best practices gleaned from experience. OUR STAFF Lorna Garey, content director; lorna.garey@ubm.com Heather Vallis, managing editor, research; heather.vallis@ubm.com Elizabeth Chodak, copy chief; elizabeth.chodak@ ubm.com Tara DeFilippo, associate art director; tara.defilippo@ubm.com Find all of our reports at reports.informationweek.com. reports.informationweek.com SYNOPSIS ABOUT US reports RESEARCH 2014 Private Cloud Survey Survey Name InformationWeek 2014 Private Cloud Survey Survey Date November 2013 Region North America Number of Respondents 242 at organizations with 50 or more employees Purpose To examine private cloud adoption and strategies in the enterprise Methodology InformationWeek surveyed business technology decision-makers at North American companies with 50 or more employees. The survey was conducted online, and respondents were recruited via an email invitation containing an embedded link to the survey. The email invitation was sent to qualified InformationWeek subscribers. January 2014 6
  7. 7. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey (Nearly) Zero To Private Cloud In Two Years It’s been 20 months since our last InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey, and boy, have things changed. Now, 20 months happens to be just shy of the gestation period for an African elephant. In less time than it takes to make an elephant, the percentage of enterprises reporting functional private clouds more than doubled, from 21% to 47%. That’s pretty phenomenal. What’s equally amazing is that, in April 2012, 30% of respondents were starting cloud projects. A 26-percentage-point increase in shops with functional clouds means that most of those schemes, on the drawing board two years ago, made it into production. We almost never see that happen. The top-level message: Private clouds are achievable, are being done in the real world, and are highly popular. Elephants should have it so good. In fact, it would be difficult to overstate the success of the private cloud vision as reported by our respondents. By every metric in the surreports.informationweek.com vey, more people are building their own clouds, and the results are almost universally better than anyone anticipated, us included. If this tech did go through a “trough of disillusionment,” it was short-lived. And it’s not like we didn’t catch private cloud at the start of what should have been its hype cycle. The OpenStack foundation wasn’t incorporated until six months after our 2012 survey, and arguably a fully functional version of vSphere had been on the scene for only about a year, since early 2011, when VMware added sup- Figure 1 Private Cloud Strategy Which best describes your state of private cloud adoption? Never considered it, no interest Considered it and decided not to build a private cloud Have a private cloud in production for most or all of our apps 7% 17% 13% Built a test version and found it wasn’t worth pursuing 3% 30% 30% Are testing various parts of a private cloud or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek 2014 Private Cloud Survey of 242 business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees, November 2013 Have a private cloud in production for some of our apps R7591213/1 January 2014 7
  8. 8. Previous Next Table of Contents FAST FACT 23% of respondents to our 2014 Private Cloud Survey say they’re not pursuing private clouds. reports.informationweek.com reports port for Windows Server 2008, RHEL 6, SLES 11, Ubuntu, and Solaris. Essentially, the stars lined up for private cloud. To wit, vSphere 5 hit the market just after our first survey and brought to bear some very useful capabilities, including storage virtualization, data protection, and replication. CloudStack, an open source private cloud suite that’s been battling out with Eucalyptus and OpenStack, was released to the public a few months before OpenStack was formed; though it figures less prominently in our data, having platform choice makes IT comfortable. While our survey shows some winners and losers among vendors providing the software and systems for private clouds — we’ll get into that later — what’s more interesting is an apparent swing in thinking about which technologies are most important for building a successful cloud. The takeaway here is that what was important to early adopters didn’t necessarily stay important to mainstream users. This too is unusual. It indicates either that unique needs drove early adopters, or that the technology itself has evolved in 2014 Private Cloud Survey terms of how it tackles the problems of the modern datacenter, even as users were happily moving from project to production. We think both are true. Early adopters likely realized they were spending too much time on the plate-spinning that typified datacenter operations before pervasive virtualization and the automation that comes with private Figure 2 clouds. However, two years ago, the technology was far from baked. Heck, it’s still not completely baked if you want to pursue the darlings of the trade press, OpenStack and its offshoots. VMware, meanwhile, has (fairly quietly) built up its private cloud arsenal; for most private cloud adherents, this is the way to go. VMware’s software isn’t inexpensive, but the Approach to New Technology Adoption Which of the following best describes your organization’s IT practices and outlook when adopting new technology? 2014 2012 Bleeding edge; new features can’t come fast enough 3% 2% Leading edge; we adopt faster than others in our industry 21% 20% Current; we keep up with others in our industry 59% 56% Old school; we don’t adopt new technology until we have to 17% 22% Base: 242 respondents in November 2013 and 389 in April 2012 Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees R7591213/2 January 2014 8
  9. 9. Previous Next Download reports.informationweek.com For most enterprises, DR can be done across company-owned or blue-chip colocation sites. That tactic lets old-guard IT pros sleep better. Resistance Is Futile? Before we get into the whys and hows of private cloud adoption, let’s look at why today’s Figure 3 Reasons for Not Adopting a Private Cloud What are your main reasons for not pursuing a private cloud strategy? 2012 Note: Three responses allowed Base: 56 respondents in November 2013 and 189 in April 2012 not using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees R 11% 8% 20% Other 9% Haven’t considered it 12% 6% Investigated and found it too new and untested 14% 13% Need different staffing 14% 14% Investigated and found we are not prepared 18% 8% Investigated and found it too complex and expensive 32% 26% Applications don't support the cloud model 28% No budget for new initiatives Other IT projects take priority 32% 32% 17% 33% 41% 51% 2014 Investigated and found it’s not a fit at this time Buying power and influence are rapidly shifting to service providers. Where does that leave enterprise IT? Not at the cutting edge, that’s for sure: Only 19% are increasing both the number and capability of servers, budgets are level or down for 60%, and just 12% are using new microserver technology. only way IT gets to work on new initiatives is by automating the old stuff, and that makes the cost worthwhile. It’s interesting that satisfaction with private clouds seems to come at the expense of public and hybrid models. We saw a five-point increase in the percentage of respondents saying they’re phasing out their public cloud use — though similar to 2012, 21% say they will eventually use the public cloud but aren’t today. Of those using or planning to use the public cloud in 2012, 11% said “no” to the hybrid cloud model; that’s increased to 19% now. This is likely due to the nature of private cloud users today (the majority of IT shops) compared with then (early adopters who like to experiment). The public cloud can be a great place for testing and business continuity, but tools capable of duplicating and deploying internal systems into the public cloud are just now coming to market. VMware has its own public cloud offering, but costs are not yet in line with Amazon and its ilk — and likely won’t be if the Google-driven price wars keep up. We’re talking a 60% slash in block storage costs. 2014 Private Cloud Survey 29% 2014 State of Server Technology reports Don’t see a need Table of Contents R7591213/3 January 2014 9
  10. 10. Next reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey reports.informationweek.com tions not supporting a cloud model, lack of budget, no perceived need, and 20% who just hadn’t considered it. Today, the top answer is no need, followed by “investigated it and found it not a fit.” The percentage saying they haven’t considered private cloud fell from 20% to just 9%. Those respondents who say they did investigate but found it too untested has doubled, from 6% in 2012 to 12% now. So whereas in 2012 many dismissed private clouds out of hand, today, the eschewers are classic — well, laggards. They’ll do it when and if the technology they’re using runs out of steam or simply no longer supports the business. What would persuade them to consider moving faster? Then, as now, significant operational and capital R7591213/4 expense savings. Other 4% 5% 11% 15% More mature products and services 22% 16% Successes at other organizations like ours 16% 20% Industry standards for product integration and management 25% 23% Lower cost to entry A compelling technical advantage Significant capital cost savings Significant operational cost savings 47% 48% 45% 54% 61% 62% abstainers are holding back and how their rea- most common case with this group. Back in soning differs from two years ago. The first thing 2012, the biggest reason for not pursing a prito note is that private cloud eschewers are in vate cloud was that other projects took priorthe laggard camp. Today, 23% say they’re not ity; that justification was followed by applicapursuing the technology, and Figure 4 the Rogers Innovation AdopReasons to Consider a Private Cloud tion Curve pockets the last What factors would compel you to consider a private cloud? 16% of adopters as laggards. 2014 2012 We will admit that the term “laggard” is pejorative, and that there are good reasons these shops aren’t on the bandwagon. Typically, they don’t have a need pressing enough to justify the disruption of a private cloud. Remember all those small businesses that happily chugged along on their AS/400s in the ’90s while the rest of us where in the midst of the clientserver revolution? Sometimes when things aren’t broke, you don’t fix them. Note: Three responses allowed And that appears to be the Base: 56 respondents in November 2013 and 189 in April 2012 not using a private cloud 4% 6% Table of Contents Nothing Previous January 2014 10
  11. 11. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey No Fear, No Loathing We offered non-cloud-user respondents a list of 13 complications that could sink a pri- vate cloud, from orphaned applications to an inability to hire and keep staff with the necessary skills. In 2012, most of the fears on this list Figure 5 Perceived Private Cloud Issues What are the main problems you would envision with a private cloud? Note: Three responses allowed Base: 56 respondents in November 2013 and 189 in April 2012 not using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com 9% Other 5% 7% 3% Runaway automated processes 13% 9% Orchestrating new application and VM deployments 25% 11% Vendor lock-in to a private cloud product set or partner program 19% 13% Orphaned applications 13% 16% Managing software and VM OS licensing 16% 16% Integrating new hardware and software 18% 19% Maintaining private cloud software 18% 17% Controlling VM sprawl Lack of standards Increased capital costs 21% 20% 24% 27% 32% 24% 23% Increased troubleshooting difficulty 34% 38% Increased operational cost and complexity Inability to hire and maintain staff with the necessary skills 2012 43% 2014 R7591213/5 garnered between 15% and 25% of responses, meaning worries ranged across the board. The only exception was increased cost — that was cited by 38% in 2012 and still leads the list with 43% today. Other fears exceeding the 25% mark in this year’s survey, besides cost: increased troubleshooting issues, inability to find qualified staff, and increased capital costs. Interestingly, vendor lock-in, which was picked by 25% in 2012, is down to just 11% now; see Figure 5. Our take is that nonadopters simply don’t wrestle with the management challenges most enterprises face today — much as the AS/400 crowd simply brought their systems up and let them run, sometimes for years, without much intervention. On the flip side, those who have private clouds in production seem delighted with the results. On our five-point scale, where 1 is “completely unsuccessful” and 5 is “completely successful,” any rating that exceeds 4.0 implies a very happy user community. Responses in the 3.0 to 4.0 range are typical for mainstream technology. In 2012, early January 2014 11
  12. 12. Previous Next Table of Contents Like This Report? Rate It! Something we could do better? Let us know. Rate reports.informationweek.com reports adopters loved their clouds; when asked about success in meeting IT goals, no response drew lower than a 3.6 in 2012, and four of the 10 goals were rated between 4.0 and 4.2. The top responses — more efficient use of hardware and better scalability — were no surprise. Those were prime private cloud selling points from the get go. Somewhat more surprising: Reliability and better use of IT’s time also rated 4.0. And it’s this better use of time that you should be striving for. You aren’t going to get much in the way of new staffing, so if you can free up half or more of your operations team to do other things, you’ve made a huge win. Now that the early majority has joined early adopters, you might expect the exuberance level to moderate. You’d be wrong. Again, all IT goals were rated 3.6 or higher, but this year, six were rated 4.0 and above, and top responses were up a tenth of a point, to 4.3. It’s remarkable — even the “business-user selfservice portal” aspect of private cloud gets a 3.6 rating. We expected this to be at the bottom of the list because, frankly, the idea 2014 Private Cloud Survey sounds better in vendor PowerPoints than it works in practice. Moreover, some recent adopters aren’t necessarily what you’d call classic technology leaders. One IT manager at a natural gas distribution company says his organization deFigure 6 cided to outsource its entire datacenter to an IBM private cloud. His reasoning? IBM could do a better job than his team, and private cloud technology made it a cost-effective option. The project started two years ago and is now in full production. He expects to see Success of Private Cloud How would you describe the overall success of your private cloud? 2014 2012 A complete success 17% 14% Very successful 47% 57% Somewhat successful 36% 28% Somewhat unsuccessful 0% 1% A complete failure 0% 0% Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees R7591213/6 January 2014 12
  13. 13. Previous Next Table of Contents Like This Report? Share it! Tweet Like Share reports.informationweek.com reports some cost savings in the next one to two years — and by any measure, he’s delighted with the results. This is in marked contrast to those who are in the planning phase. For that group, just as in 2012, most IT goals were rated in the midto high threes on our scale, which we characterize as cautious optimism. These people are essentially late adopters, always a wary, even skeptical group, so those findings aren’t surprising. It’s likely that they’ll be fairly delighted with the results — if they acquire or develop the expertise they need to succeed in what’s becoming a fairly competitive market for private cloud skills. That’s a big “if.” As is usually the case with a new technology, even when IT loves it, translating success from the datacenter to the business is tricky. When we asked those using private clouds about success in meeting business goals, in 2012, the responses that got the best marks (3.9 or 3.8) had to do with budgetary savings. While CXOs love to see IT costs held in check, at the time we thought, “Hopefully there are other business successes to celebrate be- 2014 Private Cloud Survey yond just saving a buck.” And so it is this year. Every single metric we offered but one got a score of 3.9. Joining the three cost-saving criteria were meeting ser vice-level agreements, better alignment with business needs, and improved quality control. The only metric that didn’t get a 3.9 was the same one at the bottom of the pile in 2012: the ability to charge back or track expenses to business units. Let’s face it — CIOs will do al- Figure 7 Private Cloud Timeline How long did it take to bring your private cloud from concept to production? 2014 2012 Less than six months 19% 26% More than six months but less than one year 34% 29% 12 to 18 months 26% 27% More than 18 months 11% 13% Don’t know 10% 5% Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees R7591213/7 January 2014 13
  14. 14. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey 3.6 3.7 3.6 Better average application performance Business user self-service portal for select IT services 3.8 3.9 Better peak application performance 3.6 3.9 3.9 Shorten time to deliver applications to the business 4.0 3.9 Better disaster recovery More efficient use of IT's time Standardized OS builds 3.9 4.1 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.0 Better overall reliability Better scalability 4.3 4.2 More efficient use of hardware 1 Completely unsuccessful 4.3 4.2 will perceive their technology line items as big, fat costs they can’t control. It’s ingrained in the American psyche to abhor such costs (think taxes). We almost never see a Figure 8 chargeback plan, IT or otherwise, that’s popular with the business, so it Success in Meeting IT Goals How successful is your private cloud in meeting the following IT goals? Please use a scale of 1 to 5, where makes sense for CIOs to resist. 1 is “completely unsuccessful” and 5 is “extremely successful.” If you’re in this rut, don’t panic. Busi2014 2012 ness benefit will by necessity lag IT benefit. If your private cloud has freed up staff time, that’s half a win. The other half is to be smart about getting those freed-up people working on things that directly, and visibly, benefit the business. Extremely successful 5 most anything to avoid being a chargeback cost. It’s a recipe for unpopularity. No matter how good a job IT does, business managers R7591213/8 Note: Mean average ratings Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com Private Cloud: The Last Nail In APM’s Coffin? One IT discipline that was completely broken by the private cloud is classic application performance management. Virtualization made life hard for APM tools, which typically rely on fully understanding the static application deployment model and then re- porting on the performance of various pieces. Still, we were surprised when our 2013 APM Survey showed the use of these tools in serious retreat, even as a new breed of APM vendor tried to fill the void with predictive systems. The problem? Filling the void wasn’t what IT needed. After all, we’ve complained for years about an inability to align operations with the needs of the business, and APM alone wasn’t doing the job. Static tools might tell you about impending problems, but without the mobility and control inherent in a private cloud, there just wasn’t a lot IT could do about them — at least not quickly. Products seeking to replace old-guard APM tools have evolved in two directions. Either they attempt to maintain maps of what was running where by observing and then tracking an application’s dependencies, or they’re outcome-based and use synthetic transactions to show what users are experiencing. The idea: Understand what components of your apps aren’t running well, and then use synthetic transactions to tell you what that means to users. Together the two can help IT January 2014 14
  15. 15. Previous Next Table of Contents FAST FACT 65% of respondents are using VMware products as part of their private clouds. reports.informationweek.com reports tune the system to meet needs in near real time. Will it be inexpensive? No, but it may be worthwhile. We discuss APM in much more depth in our report. The upshot: Whether by using new APM products or, more likely, the APM capabilities built into private cloud software itself along with some ad hoc, internally built monitoring tools, IT has become significantly more responsive because of the private cloud, and that alone is a reason for celebration. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t still challenges. The biggest is one that’s been top of mind from the advent of cloud computing: integration. IT pros read about startups that live in the cloud and hear line-of-business managers who’ve purchased their own softwareas-a-service apps brag about the efficiency and cost effectiveness of these one-off uses, and they start to get that sick-in-the-pit-ofthe-stomach feeling about the integration mess that will soon land in their laps. In that light, it’s not surprising that the three challenges that top the list for new private clouds are integrating existing IT products, 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 9 Success in Meeting Business and Process Goals How successful is your private cloud in meeting the following business and process goals? Please use a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 is "completely unsuccessful" and 5 is "extremely successful." 2014 2012 1 Completely unsuccessful Extremely successful 5 Ability to meet service-level agreements 3.9 3.6 Lower capital costs over time 3.9 3.9 Improved alignment between IT costs and business needs 3.9 3.6 Lower total cost of ownership 3.9 3.8 Improved quality control 3.9 3.7 Lower operational costs over time 3.9 3.8 Ability to charge back to track expenses to business units 3.4 3.3 Note: Mean average ratings Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees R7591213/9 January 2014 15
  16. 16. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey bringing IT staff skills up to snuff, and updating the infrastructure (see Figure 10). As the early majority of IT shops move into Figure 10 Challenges Encountered When Launching a What were the main hurdles you overcame to launch your private cloud? 2012 Note: Three responses allowed Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com 15% 1% Other 5% 6% Creating runbooks Employee resistance 16% 19% 27% 19% Inventorying existing applications and services 17% Managing automation 25% 26% 30% Acquiring cloud software and hardware 27% 23% Making the business case for private cloud Updating our infrastructure Acquiring employee skill sets Integrating existing IT products 43% 51% 51% 52% 56% 59% 2014 the private cloud, issues like making the business case for the technology become more pronounced. So does managing automation, as these are organizations that likely had Private Cloud found ways to be happy with old-school APM systems that could report on problems, even if IT did need days to weeks to do anything about the issues uncovered. R7591213/10 Not All Smooth Sailing Even the most successful private clouds aren’t without operational problems. Overall, these systems still use immature technology that requires admins with skill and determination. In 2012, respondents worried about software licensing, a lack of stan- dards, virtual machine sprawl, and troubleshooting. This year, top issues are increased operational costs, VM sprawl, keeping skilled staff, and, again, software licensing. Vendors should take heed: These concerns point to where private cloud technology needs to go. Take licensing. Even just two years ago, some vendors were hesitant to let their software run in virtual machines. That problem has mostly been addressed; now at issue is the number of instances and how to bill for software that runs in a private cloud. This becomes even touchier as more shops use their private clouds for disaster recovery, which can come with big new software licensing bills (see Figure 11). One big change is the type of services offered from private clouds. In 2012, SaaS and infrastructure-as-a-service were the most popular services delivered; that’s changed to Saas and platform-as-a-service this year, with IaaS falling behind by 14 points. This, too, makes a lot of sense. Early adopters were likely to be companies that could immediately benefit January 2014 16
  17. 17. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 11 Private Cloud Issues What are the main problems you've encountered with your private cloud? 7% 4% Runaway automated processes 12% 7% Maintaining private cloud software 14% 7% Vendor lock-in to a private cloud product set or partner program 27% 17% Increased troubleshooting difficulty 15% Increased capital costs Orphaned applications Note: Three responses allowed Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com 20% 20% 20% 22% 22% Orchestrating new application and VM deployments 23% Integrating new hardware and software 24% Lack of standards 28% 31% 31% Managing software and VM OS licensing 27% 27% 15% 27% 28% Controlling VM sprawl 26% Increased operational cost and complexity Inability to hire and maintain staff with the necessary skills 2012 34% 2014 pect will be the dominant service for IT shops. Other unexpected moves? A decrease in the percentage of organizations that upgraded their apps to run in a private cloud and an increase in the number of shops building their own clouds rather than bringing in consultants or vendor professional services. That’s in contrast to those now in the planning stages. Forty-one percent of late adopters expect to upgrade their enterprise apps — never a simple, politically popular, or inexpensive process, as we saw in our 2014 Application Consolidation Survey. This alone is likely a leading reason why late adopters are late. Again, it may be that as late adopters get their private clouds going, they’ll be happily surprised about their ability to keep the apps they have. In some cases, the upgrades will just be to current verR7591213/11 sions of the same application — 4% 5% business compared with typical enterprises. If anything, we’re surprised that PaaS managed even such a close second to SaaS, which we ex- Other from cloud technology, even if it wasn’t fully baked, because they were more likely to be providing infrastructure services to lines of January 2014 17
  18. 18. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Which technologies needed to be updated or replaced to build your organization's private cloud? 2012 Note: Multiple responses allowed Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com 29% Identity management 17% Application modeling Performance management 24% 24% 28% 24% Systems management Operating systems Enterprise applications 29% 28% 31% 34% 42% 33% 33% 34% Virtualization technology Networking equipment Storage equipment Network design Security products 33% 32% 36% 37% 40% 37% 38% 33% Configuration and service provisioning software Storage design Server hardware 32% 39% 40% 45% 2014 9% Tech Updates Needed to Build a Private Cloud 5% Figure 12 private clouds. It’s fair to say that the glowing results revealed by this survey are largely attributable to one vendor: VMware. Now almost 20 points ahead of Microsoft and Cisco, VMware dominates the list of vendors used in deployments. We offered 19 options, and 65% of respondents are using VMware products as part of their private clouds, and that even with open source options in consideration. While VMware was the big winner, Citrix and NetApp gained some ground, up four and five points, respectively. Dell and EMC were big losers, with sevenand eight-point drops. Cisco and Microsoft were small losers, each with a three-point drop. That may R7591213/12 not mean that Cisco gear Programming languages and environments Vendor Blanket Bingo We saw some interesting movement in the list of vendors respondents use to implement 14% 17% sooner or later, software vendors will stop supporting that decade-old version of your software, even if it suits your needs just fine. January 2014 18
  19. 19. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey in particular is being used less as part of a private cloud; it’s fair to say that its engagements seem to be with large businesses, while VMware’s is across the board. Particularly for those in the planning stages, VMware is dominant. A large airline now in the design phase Figure 13 Importance of Private Cloud Features Chargeback billing or tracking Runbook automation Bare-metal provisioning 2.8 2.8 2.8 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.0 Service catalogue Self-service portal Note: Mean average ratings Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.1 Support hybrid mode (public and private cloud) Delegated administration 3.0 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.4 3.3 Demand-based auto-scaling Application deployment templates 3.5 3.4 Audit logs Application mobility 3.7 3.5 3.8 3.8 VM mobility 3.5 3.5 2012 4.0 3.9 Application performance management 1 Not important Very important 5 2014 Capacity rights management, i.e., permission to not only spin up a VM, but how many, how much storage, etc. Please rate the importance of the following features when selecting private cloud technology, using a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 is “not important” and 5 is “very important.” R7591213/13 cites a good number of blue-chip players as critical to its private cloud plan, including Cisco, EMC, Microsoft, NetApp, and of course VMware. In contrast, a major player in the hospitality industry has partnered with BMC, EMC, IBM, Oracle, Red Hat — and VMware. Overall we see a focus on upgrading servers and reworking storage systems rather than virtualizing networks. We think it’s likely that the software-defined networking movement, which is new since late 2011, has most IT shops taking a wait-and-see approach. In the meantime, they’re busily implementing private clouds as envisioned by VMware in its vSphere product line. The same is true for those in the planning stages. VMware will be used by 69% of these respondents, with Microsoft named by 57% — both saw seven-point bumps over 2012. Oracle is a surprise winner here too: 30% say it will be part of the plan, up 10 points for a 50% increase over 2012. That likely means adoption of Fusion middleware, finally. But the biggest gain of all was for OpenStack. In 2012, just 4% thought they’d use it. Now January 2014 19
  20. 20. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 19% have OpenStack in their plans. We suspect that there are two groups in this late-adopter set. The larger, we believe, comprises smaller, single-datacenter shops for whom business is not strictly dependent on a leading-edge IT infrastructure. The other is highly complex environments and probably governmental entities. These shops, we believe, are more likely to find the OpenStack offering appealing than products from VMware, Microsoft, or others. CA and BMC did well in our vendor list, too, which tends to confirm our belief that these late adopters are not strictly small companies. One vendor that ceded significant ground among planners is Hewlett-Packard, which lost more than half of its support with a 15point drop. This is very bad news for a company that’s put a lot of emphasis on its public and private cloud capabilities. We didn’t ask about white-box vendors for networking, servers, or storage — but we wish we had. What seems to be clear is that the private cloud is shaping up to be a software play, with the software largely coming from established players, and from OpenStack and its reports.informationweek.com 2014 Private Cloud Survey constituents. Specialty players like Eucalyptus, RightScale, VCE, Nimbula, and Piston Cloud remain within the margin of error for our survey, among both private cloud users and planners; none was cited by more than 3% in our survey (see Figure 50). Private cloud builders aren’t completely turning on vendors of higher-priced gear, but it does appear that VMware has convinced IT that the choice of underlying hardware is not as important as it once was. The result: a slow movement away from the usual hardware vendors as the providers of infrastructural direction. We saw some of that in our 2014 State of Servers poll. If you’re worried about the efficacy of pri- Figure 14 Use of Chargeback Does your organization use chargeback within your private cloud? 2014 2012 Yes, we charge departments and projects for resources 22% 22% Yes, but for monitoring and cost awareness only 24% 18% No 49% 51% Don’t know 5% 9% Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees R7591213/14 January 2014 20
  21. 21. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey vate cloud technology, you should feel assured that it’s worth the commitment. Once in place, unless you’ve done it wrong, you will see lower operational costs and be able to reclaim some of your existing staff’s valuable time. It’s easy to take away from the typical trade press the message that you really need to wait and see how software-defined networking turns out, or whether open source products like CloudStack and OpenStack are solid enough for the mainstream. Don’t listen, and don’t stay on the sidelines too long or you’ll never get the expertise you need. Get your technology where you feel comfortable, whether from VMware or a longterm strategic partner like IBM or Oracle. All the big vendors have plays. The bottom line is that private cloud technology is a boon for most IT shops. If you’re not sure whether you should worry about SDN, or private cloud, the answer is that you probably don’t need to. Those who do know exactly who they are and can believe our survey respondents — private cloud is no passing hype. reports.informationweek.com January 2014 21
  22. 22. Previous Next Table of Contents APPENDIX reports reports.informationweek.com 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 15 Types of Private Clouds Offered Which types of private clouds do you offer your organization? 2014 2012 SaaS 40% 39% PaaS 38% 31% IaaS 23% 37% All of the above 26% 24% Note: Multiple responses allowed Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees R7591213/15 January 2014 22
  23. 23. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 16 Private Cloud Across Multiple Data Centers Does your private cloud extend across multiple data centers? 2014 2012 Yes 60% 59% No 35% 36% Don’t know 5% 5% Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/16 January 2014 23
  24. 24. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 17 Movement Among Data Center Locations Does IT move VMs, applications, and data among data center locations? 2014 2012 Yes 71% 70% No 26% 26% Don’t know 3% 4% Base: 68 respondents in November 2013 and 49 respondents at organizations with a private cloud extending across multiple data centers Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/17 January 2014 24
  25. 25. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 18 Private Cloud Requirement for New Applications Does your organization require that all new applications be able to take advantage of your private cloud? 2014 2012 Yes; no exceptions 6% 3% Yes, with some exceptions 42% 34% Only for server applications destined for our private cloud 18% 28% No 32% 29% Don't know 2% 6% Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/18 January 2014 25
  26. 26. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 19 Required App-Level Features and Functions What features and functions are required at the application level? 2014 2012 Application performance management 70% 78% Dynamic scaling of services 68% 72% Lossless session failover 55% 48% Note: Multiple responses allowed Base: 75 respondents in November 2013 and 50 in April 2012 with private cloud requirements for new applications Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/19 January 2014 26
  27. 27. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 20 Dealing With Legacy Applications How did your organization handle legacy applications? 2014 2012 Replaced them with newer applications 35% 36% Upgraded to cloud-ready applications 28% 43% Rewrote them to support our private cloud 21% 19% Other 4% 5% No change 35% 29% Note: Multiple responses allowed Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/20 January 2014 27
  28. 28. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 21 Approach Taken to Build a Private Cloud Which of the following best describes your approach to building your private cloud? 2014 2012 Used internal expertise 33% 24% Used consultants 10% 15% Used vendor professional services 8% 11% Mix of internal expertise and consultants 28% 26% Mix of internal expertise and vendor professional services 19% 22% Other 2% 2% Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/21 January 2014 28
  29. 29. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 22 Acquiring Knowledgeable Staff How did your organization acquire staff knowledgeable in private cloud technologies? 2014 2012 Trained existing staff 76% 89% Augmented existing staff with consultants 41% 32% Hired new staff 28% 16% Outsourced the management 5% 5% Other 2% 1% Note: Multiple responses allowed Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/22 January 2014 29
  30. 30. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 23 Build vs. Bundle Did your organization buy a private cloud via a preconfigured bundle, like Vblocks, or build from individual products and product suites? 2014 2012 Individual products 55% 69% Open source and commercial management software 21% 6% Bundle 19% 17% Other 5% 8% Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/23 January 2014 30
  31. 31. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 24 Private Cloud Vendors Used Which vendors did you use for your private cloud? 2012 25% Note: Multiple responses allowed Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R 10% 6% Other 0% 1% Nimbula 0% 1% Eucalyptus 2% 4% VCE 3% 4% CloudStack 4% 6% CA BMC 6% 6% 7% 5% OpenStack 17% EMC Red Hat 18% 17% 20% 15% NetApp Oracle 21% 20% 24% 25% IBM Citrix 24% 20% 27% 28% HP Dell Cisco Microsoft VMware 31% 38% 46% 49% 46% 49% 56% 65% 2014 R7591213/24 January 2014 31
  32. 32. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 25 Budget to Build a Private Cloud Approximately what percentage of your overall IT budget was devoted to building your private cloud? 2014 2012 Less than 10% 21% 26% 11% to 20% 18% 20% 21% to 30% 18% 20% 31% to 40% 10% 7% 41% to 50% 7% 6% More than 50% 9% 10% Don’t know 17% 11% Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/25 January 2014 32
  33. 33. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 26 Budget to Maintain a Private Cloud What percentage of your overall IT budget is devoted to maintaining your private cloud? 2014 2012 Less than 10% 31% 33% 11% to 20% 28% 26% 21% to 30% 12% 16% 31% to 40% 5% 5% 41% to 50% 2% 4% More than 50% 4% 4% Don't know 18% 12% Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/26 January 2014 33
  34. 34. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 27 Impact of Industry Standards on Product Selection To what degree did industry standards play a role in product selection? 2014 2012 A lot 35% 44% Some 46% 43% None 12% 12% Don’t know 7% 1% Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/27 January 2014 34
  35. 35. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 28 Use of Public Cloud Services Does your organization use public cloud services? 2014 2012 Yes 39% 45% Yes, but we are phasing them out 13% 8% Not yet, but we will 21% 22% No, and no plans 27% 25% Base: 113 respondents in November 2013 and 83 in April 2012 using a private cloud Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/28 January 2014 35
  36. 36. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 29 Use of Hybrid Cloud Model Does your organization use or plan to use a hybrid cloud model, where applications may run, in whole or in part, in both the public and private cloud? 2014 2012 Yes; we’re using a hybrid cloud model 35% 40% Yes; we plan to use a hybrid cloud model 37% 36% No 19% 11% Don’t know 9% 13% Base: 68 respondents in November 2013 and 55 in April 2012 using a private cloud and using or planning to use public cloud services Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/29 January 2014 36
  37. 37. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 30 Reasons for Not Using a Public Cloud What are the main reasons your organization is phasing out, or has decided to not use, public cloud? 2014 2012 Security and privacy concerns 73% 68% Regulatory compliance or legal restrictions 33% 39% Peak loads could wipe out cost savings 29% 11% Inability to ensure SLA commitments 27% 21% Inability to ensure application availability 22% 25% Other 9% 11% Note: Three responses allowed Base: 45 respondents in November 2013 and 28 in April 2012 phasing out or not using public cloud services Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/30 January 2014 37
  38. 38. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 31 Stage of Private Cloud Deployment At what stage is your organization in deploying your private cloud? 2014 2012 Research and planning 42% 24% Making the business case 18% 18% Evaluating products 23% 22% Running a pilot project 12% 24% Moving from pilot to production 5% 12% Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/31 January 2014 38
  39. 39. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 32 Steps Taken to Build a Private Cloud What steps has your organization taken to build a private cloud? Completed In progress Not started Built the underlying server, storage, and networking infrastructure 18% 49% 33% Deployed hypervisors and management framework 17% 49% 34% Built a self-service portal 14% 40% 46% Automated subsystems 8% 33% 59% Inventoried applications and workflows 8% 44% 48% Created required services like runbooks and CMDBs 8% 25% 67% Created application templates 6% 31% 63% Integrated subsystems 5% 30% 65% Orchestrated automation across multiple subsystems 30% 70% R7591213/32 Base: 73 respondents testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek 2014 Private Cloud Survey of 242 business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees, November 2013 reports.informationweek.com R January 2014 39
  40. 40. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 33 Expected Private Cloud Timeline How long do you expect it will take to bring your private cloud from concept to production? 2014 2012 Less than six months 3% 9% More than six months but less than one year 30% 33% 12 to 18 months 27% 30% More than 18 months 27% 17% Don’t know 13% 11% Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/33 January 2014 40
  41. 41. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 34 Expected Success of IT Goals How successful do you predict your private cloud will be in meeting the following IT goals? Please use a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 is “completely unsuccessful” and 5 is “extremely successful.” 3.7 3.8 3.4 Better average application performance Better peak application performance 3.5 3.8 3.8 Shorten time to deliver applications to the business 4.0 3.8 More efficient use of IT's time 3.8 3.7 3.8 3.9 Better disaster recovery Standardized OS builds Better overall reliability 3.8 3.9 3.8 3.9 4.1 3.9 Better scalability Business user self-service portal for select IT services 2012 4.0 4.1 More efficient use of hardware 1 Completely unsuccessful Extremely successful 5 2014 R7591213/34 Note: Mean average ratings Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R January 2014 41
  42. 42. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 35 Expected Success of Business and Process Goals How successful do you predict your private cloud will be in meeting the following business and process goals? Please use a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 is “completely unsuccessful” and 5 is “extremely successful.” 2014 2012 Extremely successful 5 1 Completely unsuccessful Lower total cost of ownership 3.7 3.8 Lower operational costs over time 3.7 3.8 Improved quality control 3.7 3.8 Lower capital costs over time 3.7 3.8 Improved alignment between IT costs and business needs 3.7 3.7 Ability to meet service-level agreements 3.6 3.8 Ability to charge back to track expenses to business units 3.1 3.5 Note: Mean average ratings Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/35 January 2014 42
  43. 43. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 36 Expected Challenges of Launching a Private Cloud What are the main hurdles you believe you will need to overcome to launch your private cloud? 2012 22% Other 4% 4% 15% 15% 17% Creating runbooks Inventorying existing applications and services 34% 19% Acquiring cloud software and hardware 27% 23% Making the business case for private cloud 29% 29% Managing automation 24% Employee resistance Acquiring employee skill sets Updating our infrastructure Integrating existing IT products 33% 36% 41% 41% 44% 55% 58% 2014 R7591213/36 Note: Three responses allowed Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R January 2014 43
  44. 44. reports.informationweek.com R 45% 29% 21% 22% Note: Three responses allowed Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees 18% 23% 27% Other 4% 3% 6% 10% Runaway automated processes 12% 16% Orchestrating new application and VM deployments 16% 17% Managing software and VM OS licensing Orphaned applications 19% 17% Maintaining private cloud software 19% 30% 27% Integrating new hardware and software Increased capital costs Lack of standards 22% 24% Increased troubleshooting difficulty 23% 21% Inability to hire and maintain staff with the necessary skills 22% Table of Contents Vendor lock-in to a private cloud product set or partner program 24% 33% 30% 2014 Increased operational cost and complexity Controlling VM sprawl Previous Next reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 37 Potential Private Cloud Problems What are the main problems you foresee with your private cloud? 2012 R7591213/37 January 2014 44
  45. 45. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 38 Necessary Tech Updates to Build a Private Cloud Which technologies will you need to update or replace to build your private cloud? 15% 23% 21% Operating systems Storage equipment 6% 27% 30% 27% 25% Application modeling Programming languages and environments 39% Note: Multiple responses allowed Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees Server hardware Performance management Networking equipment Identity management Virtualization technology Systems management Network design Security products Storage design 27% 29% 32% 33% 31% 33% 31% 34% 35% 30% 37% 33% 38% 38% 43% 45% 48% 35% Configuration and service provisioning software 27% Enterprise applications 43% 2012 49% 2014 R7591213/38 January 2014 45 reports.informationweek.com R
  46. 46. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 39 Importance of Private Cloud Features Please rate the importance of the following features when selecting private cloud technology, using a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 is “not important” and 5 is “very important.” 2014 Note: Mean average ratings Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com 3.3 2.8 3.0 Chargeback billing or tracking Runbook automation 3.0 3.1 3.2 Bare-metal provisioning Service catalogue 3.3 3.4 3.3 3.4 Delegated administration 3.3 3.4 3.4 Application deployment templates Support hybrid mode (public and private cloud) 3.6 3.6 3.4 Demand-based auto-scaling Self-service portal 3.5 3.5 3.6 3.6 Audit logs Application mobility 3.6 3.6 3.6 3.7 Capacity rights management, i.e., permission to not only spin up a VM, but how many, how much storage, etc. 3.7 3.7 VM mobility Application performance management 1 Not importnat 3.7 3.8 Very important 5 2012 R7591213/39 January 2014 46
  47. 47. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 40 Plans for Chargeback Use Will your organization use chargeback within your private cloud? 2014 2012 Yes, we will charge departments and projects for resources 14% 20% Yes, but for monitoring and cost awareness only 27% 38% No 32% 27% Don’t know 27% 15% Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/40 January 2014 47
  48. 48. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 41 Planned Private Cloud Offerings Which types of private clouds will IT offer your organization? 2014 2012 SaaS 36% 43% PaaS 36% 25% IaaS 30% 22% All of the above 27% 34% Note: Multiple responses allowed Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/41 January 2014 48
  49. 49. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 42 Planned Private Cloud Scope Will your private cloud extend across multiple data centers? 2014 2012 Yes 42% 58% No 29% 32% Don’t know 29% 10% Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/42 January 2014 49
  50. 50. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 43 Planned Movement Among Data Center Locations Will IT move VMs, applications, and data among data center locations? 2014 2012 Yes 87% 84% No 3% 4% Don’t know 10% 12% Base: 31 respondents in November 2013 and 68 in April 2012 at organizations with plans to extend a private cloud across multiple data centers Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/43 January 2014 50
  51. 51. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 44 Planned Private Cloud Requirement for New Apps Will your organization require that all new applications be able to take advantage of your private cloud? 2014 2012 Yes; no exceptions 1% 2% Yes, with some exceptions 36% 41% Only for server applications destined for our private cloud 36% 29% No 15% 14% Don’t know 12% 14% Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/44 January 2014 51
  52. 52. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 45 App-Level Feature and Function Requirements What features or functions will be required at the application level? 2014 2012 Dynamic scaling of services 73% 70% Application performance management 67% 67% Lossless session failover 50% 60% Note: Multiple responses allowed R7591213/45 Base: 53 respondents in November 2013 and 85 in April 2012 at organizations planning to have private cloud requirements for new applications Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com January 2014 52
  53. 53. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 46 Plan for Handling Legacy Applications How do you plan to handle legacy applications? 2014 2012 Upgrade to cloud-ready applications 41% 44% Replace them with newer applications 36% 51% Rewrite to support our private cloud 21% 28% Other 3% 4% No change 27% 20% Note: Multiple responses allowed Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R R7591213/46 January 2014 53
  54. 54. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 47 Planned Approach for Building a Private Cloud Which of the following best describes your planned approach for building a private cloud? 2014 2012 Will use internal expertise 19% 19% Will use consultants 11% 15% Will use vendor professional services 6% 9% Mix of internal expertise and consultants 34% 27% Mix of internal expertise and vendor professional services 30% 30% Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/47 January 2014 54
  55. 55. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 48 Strategy for Acquiring Knowledgeable Staff How will your organization acquire staff knowledgeable in private cloud technologies? 2014 2012 Train existing staff 88% 81% Augment existing staff with consultants 43% 50% Hire new staff 16% 22% Outsource the management 8% 9% Note: Multiple responses allowed Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/48 January 2014 55
  56. 56. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 49 Planned Approach for Private Cloud Purchase Will your organization buy a private cloud via a preconfigured bundle, like Vblocks, or build from individual products and product suites? 2014 2012 Individual products 36% 38% Bundle 16% 16% Open source and commercial management software 16% 15% Don’t know yet 32% 31% Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R R7591213/49 January 2014 56
  57. 57. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 50 Planned Private Cloud Vendor Use Which vendors do you plan to use for your private cloud? 2012 Note: Multiple responses allowed Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com 10% 5% Other 1% 1% Piston Cloud 1% 0% Nimbula 3% 4% VCE 3% 4% RightScale 3% 3% Eucalyptus 7% 4% CloudStack 7% 1% CA 7% 4% BMC NetApp 14% 12% 19% 4% OpenStack EMC 19% 24% 20% Red Hat HP 26% 39% 24% 29% 34% IBM Dell Oracle Citrix Cisco Microsoft VMware 20% 29% 29% 30% 34% 38% 44% 50% 51% 57% 62% 69% 2014 R7591213/50 January 2014 57
  58. 58. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 51 Estimated Budget to Build a Private Cloud Approximately what percentage of your overall IT budget do you expect to devote to building your private cloud? 2014 2012 Less than 10% 23% 15% 11% to 20% 25% 24% 21% to 30% 14% 25% 31% to 40% 8% 9% 41% to 50% 1% 3% More than 50% 1% 2% Don’t know 28% 22% Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/51 January 2014 58
  59. 59. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 52 Estimated Budget to Maintain a Private Cloud What percentage of your overall IT budget do you expect to devote to maintaining your private cloud? 2014 2012 Less than 10% 36% 29% 11% to 20% 28% 23% 21% to 30% 8% 16% 31% to 40% 1% 6% 41% to 50% 1% 2% More than 50% 1% 1% Don’t know 25% 23% Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/52 January 2014 59
  60. 60. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 53 Impact of Industry Standards on Product Selection To what degree will industry standards play a role in product selection? 2014 2012 A lot 41% 42% Some 47% 54% None 3% 1% Don’t know 9% 3% Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/53 January 2014 60
  61. 61. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 54 Public Cloud Use Does your organization use public cloud services? 2014 2012 Yes 27% 28% Yes, but we are phasing them out 10% 14% Not yet, but we will 41% 30% No, and no plans 22% 28% Base: 73 respondents in November 2013 and 117 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/54 January 2014 61
  62. 62. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 55 Hybrid Cloud Use Does your organization use or plan to use a hybrid cloud model, where applications may run, in whole or in part, in both the public and private cloud? 2014 2012 Yes; we’re using a hybrid cloud model 6% 6% Yes; we plan to use a hybrid cloud model 56% 61% No 14% 13% Don’t know 24% 20% Base: 50 respondents in November 2013 and 68 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project and using or planning to use public cloud services Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com R7591213/55 January 2014 62
  63. 63. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 56 Reasons for Not Using or Phasing Out Public Cloud What are the main reasons your organization is phasing out, or has decided to not use, public cloud? 2014 2012 Security and privacy concerns 78% 82% Regulatory compliance or legal restrictions 57% 45% Inability to ensure SLA commitments 39% 27% Inability to ensure application availability 26% 31% Peak loads could wipe out cost savings 17% 18% Other 13% 4% Note: Three responses allowed R7591213/56 Base: 23 respondents in November 2013 and 49 in April 2012 testing or starting a private cloud project and phasing out or not using public cloud services Data: InformationWeek Private Cloud Survey of business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees reports.informationweek.com January 2014 63
  64. 64. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 57 Job Title Which of the following best describes your job title? Other Consultant Line-of-business management Non-IT executive management (C-level/VP) 2%5% 1 IT executive management (C-level/VP) 3% 19% 14% 28% 29% IT director/manager IT/IS staff Data: InformationWeek 2014 Private Cloud Survey of 242 business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees, November 2013 reports.informationweek.com R7591213/57 January 2014 64
  65. 65. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 58 Company Revenue Which of the following dollar ranges includes the annual revenue of your entire organization? Don’t know/decline to say 1 Less than $6 million 11% 11% $6 million to $49.9 million Government/nonprofit 10% 17% $5 billion or more 10% 9% 14% $1 billion to $4.9 billion 6% 12% $500 million to $999.9 million Data: InformationWeek 2014 Private Cloud Survey of 242 business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees, November 2013 reports.informationweek.com $50 million to $99.9 million $100 million to $499.9 million R7591213/58 January 2014 65
  66. 66. reports.informationweek.com 2% 2% 5% 3% Data: InformationWeek 2014 Private Cloud Survey of 242 business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees, November 2013 Other Utilities 3% 4% Telecommunications/ISPs 2% Retail/e-commerce Nonprofit 2% Media/entertainment 6% Manufacturing/industrial, noncomputer 2% Logistics/transportation IT vendors 3% Insurance/HMOs Healthcare/medical Government Financial services Energy Electronics 9% 10% 10% 12% 13% Table of Contents Education 2% Consumer goods 6% Consulting and business services 4% Construction/engineering Previous Next reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 59 Industry What is your organization’s primary industry? R7591213/59 January 2014 66
  67. 67. Previous Next Table of Contents reports 2014 Private Cloud Survey Figure 60 Company Size Approximately how many employees are in your organization? 1 50-99 10,000 or more 16% 24% 100-499 21% 5,000-9,999 7% 22% 10% 1,000-4,999 500-999 Data: InformationWeek 2014 Private Cloud Survey of 242 business technology professionals at organizations with 50 or more employees, November 2013 reports.informationweek.com R7591213/60 January 2014 67
  68. 68. Previous Table of Contents MORE reports LIKE THIS Newsletter Want to stay current on all new InformationWeek Reports? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter and never miss a beat. 2014 Private Cloud Survey Want More Like This? InformationWeek creates more than 150 reports like this each year, and they’re all free to registered users. We’ll help you sort through vendor claims, justify IT projects and implement new systems by providing analysis and advice from IT professionals. Right now on our site you’ll find: 2013 SDN Survey: Growing Pains: While vendors map software-defined networking strategies and roll products out the door, IT is wary; 33% have no plans to test SDN technologies, and 47% cite product immaturity as a barrier to adoption. Cloud Control: Think private clouds offer all the flexibility and none of the risk? IT is missing out if it doesn’t prepare for public cloud use. Private Cloud Automation: Next up for private cloud initiatives: automation. Is your organization ready to take that plunge? We’ll explore the fundamentals of preparing, deploying, testing — and eventually letting automation systems run without human intervention in production environments. We’ll also examine integration and performanceoptimization issues involved with promising new automation technologies. PLUS: Find signature reports, such as the InformationWeek Salary Survey, InformationWeek 500 and the annual State of Security report; full issues; and much more. Subscribe reports.informationweek.com January 2014 68
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