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Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction
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Colorado Science Conf - Differentiated Instruction

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The Rock Band video game is a great analogy for differentiated instruction. …

The Rock Band video game is a great analogy for differentiated instruction.

Presented by Matt Anthes-Washburn and Nate Grover.
October, 2009

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • NSTA ANAHEIM, APRIL 7, 2006 Matthew F. Anthes-Washburn www.awzone.com
  • NSTA ANAHEIM, APRIL 7, 2006 Matthew F. Anthes-Washburn www.awzone.com
  • Growth is valued in a DI classroom
  • NSTA ANAHEIM, APRIL 7, 2006 Matthew F. Anthes-Washburn www.awzone.com
  • Transcript

    • 1. Science for All:Differentiating instruction and assessmentin inclusive science classroomsMatthew Anthes-WashburnNathan GroverDenver East High School
    • 2. What do you think:What is differentiated instruction?
    • 3. Meeting the needs of all learners:Who are your learners?
    • 4. What is differentiatedinstruction?• Readiness• Interest• Learning style
    • 5. Traditional instruction: ALinear ModelBoredLostUnmotivatedConfusedTeacher and afew students
    • 6. Differentiated instructionEveryone has acommonexperienceLearners’explorationsdiffer
    • 7. An analogy: Rock Band!• Common experience, individualized access• Differentiated by readiness• Difficulty level• Differentiated by interest• Choose instrument• Choose songs• Differentiated by learning style• Practice mode• Group vs. solo• Online
    • 8. People LOVE Rock Band!• Rock Band and Guitar Hero have grossed over $3 Billion• No matter what your difficulty level, you get:• Lots of positive feedback• Goals and achievements• When you practice, you get better at it.• Share the experience with friendsWhat do you do in your classroom that is like Rock Band?
    • 9. Differentiating instruction in yourclassroom: practical examples• A inquiry investigation• A mini-lesson• A problem set• A unit project
    • 10. An inquiry investigation• Everyone: Learn theprotocol for the experimentand do one trial• 10 minutes: Do severaltreatments and multipletrials of a variable yourteam chooses.• Challenge for teams that are“cooking”
    • 11. A mini-lesson
    • 12. A problem set• Traffic signals:• Green: I understand and Ican help• Yellow: It’s challenging, butI’m with you• Red: I need help• Can be used for flexiblegrouping• Greens tutor reds• Teacher helps yellows• Traffic signals:• Green: I understand and Ican help• Yellow: It’s challenging, butI’m with you• Red: I need help• Can be used for flexiblegrouping• Greens tutor reds• Teacher helps yellows
    • 13. Sports on the Moon: a sampleunit
    • 14. Differentiation of a unit project• Readiness• Interest• Learning style
    • 15. Unit PlanningUnderstanding by Design,McTighe & Wiggins•A model for settingcurricular priorities•Three domains, enduringunderstanding at the core.•Reminds us what we reallywant students to know: “IfI saw a student again 10years later, I would behappy if they rememberedthis.”Important to know and doEnduringunderstandingWorth beingfamiliar with
    • 16. The Pyramid:Differentiation by readinessOur goals:• The pyramid has a strongfoundation: standards• Present challenginginstruction at each student’slevel.• Foster learning environmentwhere all parts of thepyramid are recognized, andprogress up the pyramid isvalued.All students shouldunderstand or doMost studentswillunderstand ordoSomestudents willunderstand ordo
    • 17. Assessment: a typicalrubricA B C DDefine 10 terms Define 8 terms Define 7 terms Define 6 termsStudent A•Diligent•Motivated because she doeswhat is asked of her•Gets an “A”•Doesn’t necessarily understanddeeplyStudent B•Finds all the work ahead of herdiscouraging.•Might do 7 just to pass•Might decide not to play thegame at all
    • 18. Assessment and thelayered curriculum• Kathie Nunley, www.help4teachers.com• “Layered” curriculum encourages students to progressat their own pace to higher orders of thinking.
    • 19. The Pyramid:Another look at readiness and orders ofthinking• Each step up the pyramidis an increase in the orderof thinking required.ExplainConnect to evidenceClarifyIntegrateApplyInnovate
    • 20. Sports on the Moon
    • 21. What to notice• “A,” “B,” and “C” levels are associated with orders of thinking• Start by planning the foundation: Proficiency (C level) is the minimumstandard for satisfactory completion• Meets your state standards• Meets your criterion: What do I want them to still know in 10 years?• To move up a grade, a student must change their mode ofthinking to deeper understanding.• Revision• Self-assessment• Progress on rubric
    • 22. What level would you rate thisexplanation?Pushing an object on the moon is different from lifting it,because pushing an object it would weight the same asit would on earth. It will feel the same using yourarms, and legs bends pushing an object on the moon,and on earth . When you lifting an object the objectattend to float upon gravity pulling away from themoon. No matter how heavy an object weight when itcomes to lifting it on the moon it has a less mass. Itsdifferent on earth gravity is pulling down when you liftand object, and it does not attend to float as on themoon. It add more more weight on your arms, youuse more of your muscles, and energy when you liftingan object on earth.
    • 23. Sports on the Moon
    • 24. What level would you rate this explanation?• Football is a contact sport that involves playerstackling each other to the ground. The problemwith this on the moon is that it is harder to push anobject than to lift an object. Because of this ourgroup decided to make the game a little interesting.Instead of playing by running on feet, the playerswill move on their knees. Instead of tackling theopponent (pushing) the players must pick theopponent up and throw them over their back. Thiseliminates the gravitational factors on the mooninvolving pushing a lifting.
    • 25. Rubrics, presentation availableonline:www.awzone.comfiles

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