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Esomar Fragrance
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Esomar Fragrance

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  • Good Morning Everyone My name is Andrew Needham and I’m the Founding Partner of Face and I’m here with Ana Medeiros the Global CMI Director for Skip/Surf our presentation is going to start with a balloon; it’s going to end with a massive bang and in between we’re going to talking to you about the chemistry of co-creation. So I would like you all to pick up your balloon; I want you to muster up as much creativity as possible and then blow it into your balloon. Tie up the balloon and put it by your feet as we shall be returning to it later.
  • A quick summary of what we are going to cover in the next 25 minutes….and we have tried to put what we have learnt about Co-creation in the context of an important debate that is taking place around innovation and the role consumers particularly empowered consumers can play in the innovation and marketing process.
  • At the MRS Annual Conference I attended a few months ago there was still a cohort of researchers who see the idea of getting consumers involved in creating new products as extremely dangerous. Henry Ford’s comment has cropped up on a number of occasions – one that we all familiar with “If I had... This stems from a lack of trust that some researchers place in consumers and what they are capable of helping us to achieve as an organisation; some researchers clearly feel that they know best, and that customers do not really know what they want, so they need to be told. But does this really fit with the consumer world we live in today?
  • There is a growing army of academics, experts and companies who believe that this way of thinking is out of date and does not reflect the consumer landscape we live in today – they think more companies need to adopt a corporate mindset that is not just open to consumer ideas but places a strategic value on them. Eric von Hippel, a Professor of Management at MIT’s Sloan School is one such academic. He believes that if you could measure it, the amount of innovation driven by key consumers, or ‘leading-edge users’ as he calls them, is far greater than the volume of new ideas produced by corporations. He cites that the most effective and well-known user-centred innovation involves collaboration among, many, widely-distributed contributors via the internet. The rise of ‘open source’ software has shown how global communities of skilled and intelligent consumers collaborate to find better solutions and are prepared to reveal and share their innovations to achieve their goal. More and more companies and ousside the ones you would expect believe him - Procter & Gamble have launched its “Connect & Develop” division; Lego launched a whole new product area, called Mindstorms by co-creating with leading edge consumers
  • So what has changed? What are the big cultural changes taking place that mean co-creating with consumers has a big role to play not just in innovation but strategy and activation?
  • Web 2.0 has empowered consumers to take a much greater control of the relationship they have with brands – they create, share, mash up and play with and upload their content when they want and how they want. This has given them much more belief in their own voice, creativity and self expression. It has given rise to the term “empowered consumers”. The youth demographic create more of their own content than any other demographic. Pew Internet & American Life Project shows that in its recent reports Teen content creation continues to grow. But it is not just young consumers...add stats about women and Facebook and over 55s .
  • More and more people are and will be donating their leisure hours; their excess capacity to indulge in something they love to do. Jeff Howe, in his recent book “How the Power of the Crowd is Driving the Future of Business believes that the notion that only experts, professionals or specifically gifted people can have good ideas is no longer the case. He has coined the phrase “Crowd sourcing” that turns on the presumption that we are all creators – artists, scientists, architects and designers in any combination or any order. People don’t want to consume passively; they’d rather participate in the development and creation of products meaningful to them”. As a result the balance of power between the “professionals”, the “experts” and consumers, ordinary people, the mass market has fundamentally changed. Not just the internet that has caused this but also according to Charles Leadbeater so has the over education of the middle classes – more and more of us are going to university and then graduating with degrees that are not used in the work place. At the same time the market place requires ever greater degrees of specialization. This leaves people feeling over educated and under fulfilled, forcing many to perform their most meaningful, rewarding work outside of the office and in their free time. We have unwittingly trained the unprofessional to compete on an almost equal footing with the experts. He calls them the Pro-Ams – amateurs who work to professional standards
  • So if there is a greater role for particular consumers to get involved in the brand marketing process then how easy is it, what is the best way to achieve this and what are the benefits of doing so?
  • As a first step to helping us answer these questions we set up our own co-creation and collaboration communities for 5,000 16-25 year olds namely Headbox and for 5,000 25-50 year old women, namely Mindbubble ; it allows them to collaborate...
  • Through Headbox we then developed our thinking further. It became clear that if brands are to find the right type of consumers who want to co-create with them then they have to make a fundamental shift in the way they think about their consumers – worry less about how they can influence them and spend more time thinking about how they can let leading edge consumers influence the brand. To help us find those young people who can influence us as brands we developed our own Influencer Index which gives each Headbox member an Influence score based on a combination of different attributes – their passion areas; the skills they bring to those passion areas and the size of their network. We over lay these attributes with the affinity they have for your brand to help find the sweetspot of passionate; skilled and networked consumers who are willing to play a role in influencing your brand – we call this group “The Adfluentials”
  • It’s through this process of understanding a brand’s adfluentials that we have come to look at consumers not just as potential customers who want to buy something from you but as people who want to have a relationship with you. And depending on the relationship and how they want to engage with the brand, you decide the type of co-creation approach to use. There are two main types. Open co-creation = Passive; barriers to entry are low; not time consuming; quick and simple; making it fun Intimate co-creation = Active; barriers to entry much higher; get them to do things that are more challenging requires more skill, time and thought… It is only the top 1% who are willing and able to jump through some serious hoops (including signing up to NDA and IP agreements) that end up working with Unilever in our ‘co-creation’ sessions.
  • Unfortunately I can’t go into our process in too much detail here - you going to have to come and work with us to find out more.. but there are several general points to make. The first is bringing 16 consumers together with stakeholders and experts requires a coherent/structured process in order to get the most out of consumer creativity in way that delivers products that go on to test well. And the second is the importance of integrating on-line and offline methodologies within that process because it produces more ideas of higher quality Role of the consumer – treating them as active equals in this process; giving them as much responsibility with direct involvement throughout the entire process separates Co-creation apart from more traditional research methods. As a result it is proving a more robust process than other approaches clients have been using.
  • Show rather than tell It’s not about handing over the brief to your consumers – stakeholders and experts play a vital role in providing the context in which co-creation can take place – have an important leadership role to play as well . Outputs are name, tagline, product design what it looks like, smells like, where it sits on the shelf, price , big campaign idea and how it is activated across different channels. Present in teams back to senior stakeholders
  • I’m now going to hand over to Ana who is going to take you through some of the projects we have delivered at Unilever using Co-creation.
  • From its launch, the yearly fragrance variant of has played a key part in the success of the brand, by offering something new each year. The type of fragrance variants have evolved over time. From 1983 until about 1989, the variant names were descriptions of the fragrances and included Musk , Spice, Amber , Marine and Oriental. [ citation needed ] From 1990 until 1996 geographic names were used such as Africa , Alaska , Java , Nevada and Inca . From 1996 to 2002 Axe took inspiration from Calvin Klein fragrances (also owned by Unilever at that time), using the same perfumer, Anne Gottlieb, to develop the fragrances to launch variants such as Dimension, Apollo, Dark Temptation, Gravity, and Phoenix. [ citation needed ] From 2003 Axe advertisements portrayed various ways the products supposedly helped men attract women. In 2003 the advertising for the Pulse fragrance showed how it supposedly gave geeky men the confidence to dance to get women. This was followed by Touch, Unlimited, [4] Clix [5] and in 2007 Vice [5] was marketed on a theme of making "nice" women become "naughty".
  • From its launch, the yearly fragrance variant of has played a key part in the success of the brand, by offering something new each year. The type of fragrance variants have evolved over time. From 1983 until about 1989, the variant names were descriptions of the fragrances and included Musk , Spice, Amber , Marine and Oriental. [ citation needed ] From 1990 until 1996 geographic names were used such as Africa , Alaska , Java , Nevada and Inca . From 1996 to 2002 Axe took inspiration from Calvin Klein fragrances (also owned by Unilever at that time), using the same perfumer, Anne Gottlieb, to develop the fragrances to launch variants such as Dimension, Apollo, Dark Temptation, Gravity, and Phoenix. [ citation needed ] From 2003 Axe advertisements portrayed various ways the products supposedly helped men attract women. In 2003 the advertising for the Pulse fragrance showed how it supposedly gave geeky men the confidence to dance to get women. This was followed by Touch, Unlimited, [4] Clix [5] and in 2007 Vice [5] was marketed on a theme of making "nice" women become "naughty".
  • We can play the video on this so can keep what you say fairly brief – just to setting up the case study – put in contect how important this is for Axe – the annual varaint
  • First quote about speed is from Josh Dean the second quote is from YOU!
  • The first quote about results is from Catriona Ferris and the 2 nd is from David Cousino
  • So I’m just going to wrap things up - we’ve seen the importance of a less top down more bottom up approach – making things more fluid and interactive – treat ing consumers as equal participants in the brand marketing process not passive respondents – do things with them not at them We have also highlighted that the role of us the experts in this process is critical – there is a “co” in Co-creation. We also understand that to get the best out of consumers’ creativity there needs to be a coherent structure/process I hope also that we have seen the importance for leadership and ambition not just in this project but in wider context .Co-creation can empower researchers to become the real champions of consumer involvement, as well as the key drivers for it within an company. This will undoubtedly mean taking on the responsibility of not just encouraging companies to open up to consumers but also generating new ideas, methodologies and tools to helping make this happen. But I want to finish with the 1%ers and our lovely balloons . It’s vital as brands that you embrace your 1%ers into your business and let them influence you BECAUSE if you do this then the energy and the impact they can have on your brand could be as much if not more than the energy and impact we’re going to create by bursting all our balloons at once . So after the count of 3 i want us all to sit on our balloons – no half heartedness now - - really sit on your balloons and show your commitment to the 1%ers!! Don’t underestimate how far young consumers are prepared to go

Esomar Fragrance Esomar Fragrance Presentation Transcript

  • Fragrance Insights: The Role of Research “ Fragrance Co-creation” Andrew Needham, Founding Partner, Face
  • the debate
    • fragrance co-creation: the Axe story
    • what we learned
    • changing consumer landscape
    the fragrance co-creation process
  • “ if I had asked people what they wanted they would have said a faster horse” can consumers be trusted?
  • democratisation of innovation big companies like LEGO, P&G, Volvo are embracing co-creation
  • the debate
    • fragrance co-creation: the Axe story
    • what we learned
    • changing consumer landscape
    the fragrance co-creation process
  • empowered consumers content creators ? ?
  • the rise of pro-ams? “ the death of the respondent” “ the rise of Pro-Ams”
  • the debate
    • fragrance co-creation: the Axe story
    • what we learned
    • changing consumer landscape
    the fragrance co-creation process
  • profile and project based web 2.0 tools such as multi-media diaries and whiteboards; blogs; chat and on-line focus groups separate co-creation communities for youth & women; allowing them to collaborate with each other and brands on-line in real time
    • this is a group we call the “ adfluentials” – people who have the passion, skills & brand connection to work with you and influence what you do
    • and who have the networks to offer greatest potential for spread of positive word of mouth when they do work with you
    sweet spot of passionate, skilled & networked consumers who are willing to play a role in influencing your brand targeting your “adfluentials” brand relationship passionate, skilled & networked
  • 1% types of co-creation active passive consumption comment conversation collaboration c o-creation intimate open 1% 10% not just looking at consumers who want to buy from you
  • download explore co-create refine advance our co-creation process
  • show rather than tell the “co” in co-creation
  • the debate
    • fragrance co-creation: the Axe story
    • measurement & what we learned
    • changing consumer landscape
    the co-creation process
  • main focus of Axe variants had been on €1BN global brand Biggest male deodorant brand 2nd deodorant brand in the world Axe – the brand
  • new variants will keep the core fresh and drive our fragrance credentials… Axe variants keep the brand fresh and deliver new news recruit new users through alternative fragrance offering re-inforce quality Axe fragrance credentials
    • balanced range across the fragrance families; high quality ingredients; follow fine fragrance trends …
  • Dark Temptation making you as irresistible to women as chocolate or good enough to eat launched with the chocolate man advert – really made him famous most successful selling variant to date first time Axe focused on fragrance and a particular ingredient as the way to get the girl
    • following successful testing product is launching next year
    Face cracked a brief to develop the 2010 Axe variant and THE FRAGRANCE in just 8 weeks co-creating Axe variant 2010
  • “ in Co-creation we started in July and by the middle of August we had the chosen concept – that’s the difference in speed” Axe/Lynx CMI Team, Unilever "the quality of the output is outstanding versus most of the processes I have been working on” Surf/Skip CMI Team, Unilever
  • “ you will see from the results, the scores are really good” Comfort CMI Team Unilever “ the best testing results for an Axe variant”, Axe/Lynx CMI Team Unilever
  • co-creation trends
    • practical examples
    • what we learned
    • engaging youth in co-creation
    the co-creation process
  • let consumers influence you the importance of the 1%ers the co in co-creation the need for a coherent process the importance of leadership