Social Media & Your Career: Realities?

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Are social media websites now essential for job hunters to master? What\’s the balance between "sizzle" and "substance" in terms of what these new tools offer from a career advancement and job hunting perspective?

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  • Let’s do this last one as a group.Nobody ever wants to talk about this, I’ve found. They’re just so damn overjoyed to be working again they basically throw their “project documentation” out the window and hope to never see it again!I talk in my blog and workbook, however, about the importance of this. It’s very easy to just let the project cease the moment you’ve got a job offer. Why is it important to spend at least a few hours formally “closing” the project out, however? Why is this important in a corporate setting?Not to bum you out, but statistically, you’ll go through this process again. So the knowledge capture you do now can definitely pay dividends down the road. What proactive steps can you take to position yourself for more success later on, should you need to go through a career transition again?
  • Let’s do this last one as a group.Nobody ever wants to talk about this, I’ve found. They’re just so damn overjoyed to be working again they basically throw their “project documentation” out the window and hope to never see it again!I talk in my blog and workbook, however, about the importance of this. It’s very easy to just let the project cease the moment you’ve got a job offer. Why is it important to spend at least a few hours formally “closing” the project out, however? Why is this important in a corporate setting?Not to bum you out, but statistically, you’ll go through this process again. So the knowledge capture you do now can definitely pay dividends down the road. What proactive steps can you take to position yourself for more success later on, should you need to go through a career transition again?
  • Let’s do this last one as a group.Nobody ever wants to talk about this, I’ve found. They’re just so damn overjoyed to be working again they basically throw their “project documentation” out the window and hope to never see it again!I talk in my blog and workbook, however, about the importance of this. It’s very easy to just let the project cease the moment you’ve got a job offer. Why is it important to spend at least a few hours formally “closing” the project out, however? Why is this important in a corporate setting?Not to bum you out, but statistically, you’ll go through this process again. So the knowledge capture you do now can definitely pay dividends down the road. What proactive steps can you take to position yourself for more success later on, should you need to go through a career transition again?
  • Let’s do this last one as a group.Nobody ever wants to talk about this, I’ve found. They’re just so damn overjoyed to be working again they basically throw their “project documentation” out the window and hope to never see it again!I talk in my blog and workbook, however, about the importance of this. It’s very easy to just let the project cease the moment you’ve got a job offer. Why is it important to spend at least a few hours formally “closing” the project out, however? Why is this important in a corporate setting?Not to bum you out, but statistically, you’ll go through this process again. So the knowledge capture you do now can definitely pay dividends down the road. What proactive steps can you take to position yourself for more success later on, should you need to go through a career transition again?
  • Planning is extremely important in job hunting, because breaking your plan down into steps will help you make progress incrementally, versus getting overwhelmed by the big picture. Any marathon runners or triathletes out there? If so, would you recommend I just go out and start running 26 miles a day? Project Managers call this WBS (work breakdown structure)Debrief:What steps did you come up with? (hand out my one-page Plan) This is a list of things I usually suggest job hunters do and am comfortable sharing, since the “devil is in the details” and those folks who work with me formally get much more instruction on how to conduct each stepTime management is huge; we all have the same number of hours in the way, so success might come down to how wisely you invest them. Should looking for a job be a full-time job? Or will that be counterproductive?Will you need to obtain any subscriptions, office equipment, or special tools or software to conduct your search? Make arrangements to work outside of the house?How much money will it take to run your job search? Lattes are expensive? How much are some you spending now? Do you have a budget and are you tracking your expenses for tax purposes?Risks involved is a tricky one. Could take much longer than you think. Could get a mediocre job right away and have to make a decision. Unemployment benefits could be extended or not. Your spouse could lose his/her job. A medical issue could come up. The economy could get worse. You could get depressed. You could have to tap into your 401k if your search takes a while. Do you have a contingency plan? Had one client and wife agree to sell their house if didn’t get a job in 90 days. Ended up doing so; luckily got two offers! Opportunity costs need to be considered, too.
  • While I’m sure most of you are familiar with this credential, the market is crying out for credentialed project managersPMI has done a stellar job creating perceived value around this credentialHere’s a graph from Indeed showing the steep progression of demand for candidates with PMP credentials; clearly , companies are looking for people who know how to grab a project by the horns and ride it to completionHow many of you here have a PMP? Anybody with a CAPM?
  • Of the five phases, this one may seem the most simplistic, on the surface, but the more I thought about it, I think it contains some profound pearls of wisdom if you really play the scenario out. Get in a small group and take 10 minutes to talk about it.Debrief:Should the objective be to “get a job” or something more tactical and controllable like “generate at least $80K a year” or “achieve dialogue with every biotech company in town” or “make 100 outbound contact efforts this month?” If it is “get a job” do we need to put parameters around it in terms of timelines and salary level? For example, most of us could probably get a job tomorrow at Target, if we really felt like it…To be fair, if the objective is to obtain certain outputs, like money, should we always assume that getting a job is the only way to accomplish this? What other possibilities are there? (buying a business, starting a business, investing wisely, cutting jobs, marrying rich, robbing a bank…)You’ll obviously have to decide this for yourself, but if you truly are torn between different possibilities, there are plenty of people you could consult to help make your decisionYou might assume the project stakeholder is you and you alone, but is it? Does your job search success (or lack thereof) have an impact on your family , friends, and network, too?Have you TRULY made a go / no-go decision in the sense of making your job search a priority? Are you still begrudging the process or second-guessing yourself? I question this because statistics still frequently show that many people only invest a few hours per week iin finding work – and that the unemployment rate drops precipitously when benefits get cut off! Would a formal decision or ceremonial commitment help at all?
  • While I’m sure most of you are familiar with this credential, the market is crying out for credentialed project managersPMI has done a stellar job creating perceived value around this credentialHere’s a graph from Indeed showing the steep progression of demand for candidates with PMP credentials; clearly , companies are looking for people who know how to grab a project by the horns and ride it to completionHow many of you here have a PMP? Anybody with a CAPM?
  • This is definitely “the hump” and the hardest part. It’s put up or shut up time!Debrief:Seems silly, I know, but some people engage their family in the process, or if you’re working with a career coach or outplacement firm you might need to be clear about who’s doing what. Otherwise, you’re going to be a team of one!Again, may not be an issue if you’re flying soloThis step, however, is critical. Just like most corporate projects, I don’t think you can ever have enough communication. People get distracted. Or flake out. Or forget what you’re looking for. How do you keep all of your allies and friends in the loop? What are the options? You’ll want to keep your family from worrying about you, while keeping your network as positive as possible about your progress. If the project drags on, they’re going to lose steam. Plan for this.Unless you’re wired in a very unusual way, job hunting isn’t a lot of fun. You’re going to get frustrated. Bored. Distracted. Angry. How will you maintain a consistent pace of action and progress, despite these predictable challenges?Ah, this is a big one. Let’s turn the page.
  • What gets measured gets managed, as the old saying goes. I’m big on this. If we view this properly as a marketing project, what information would we want/need to track to maximize our success – and be able to make intelligent decisions, going forward, about potential course corrections or strategy changes?Debrief:What metrics did you come up with?What tools do you all currently use, if any, to track this information?Are you measuring your daily/weekly/monthly progress through the plan? If so, in what ways? Have you enlisted somebody else to hold you accountable?Have you set up rewards or consequences for your performance?Insanity, as the old saying goes, is “doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different ending to this cliché.” Seriously, though, have you made a very aggressive effort but experienced limited results, suggesting that some radical change in approach might be worth a try?
  • While I’m sure most of you are familiar with this credential, the market is crying out for credentialed project managersPMI has done a stellar job creating perceived value around this credentialHere’s a graph from Indeed showing the steep progression of demand for candidates with PMP credentials; clearly , companies are looking for people who know how to grab a project by the horns and ride it to completionHow many of you here have a PMP? Anybody with a CAPM?
  • What gets measured gets managed, as the old saying goes. I’m big on this. If we view this properly as a marketing project, what information would we want/need to track to maximize our success – and be able to make intelligent decisions, going forward, about potential course corrections or strategy changes?Debrief:What metrics did you come up with?What tools do you all currently use, if any, to track this information?Are you measuring your daily/weekly/monthly progress through the plan? If so, in what ways? Have you enlisted somebody else to hold you accountable?Have you set up rewards or consequences for your performance?Insanity, as the old saying goes, is “doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different ending to this cliché.” Seriously, though, have you made a very aggressive effort but experienced limited results, suggesting that some radical change in approach might be worth a try?
  • Let’s do this last one as a group.Nobody ever wants to talk about this, I’ve found. They’re just so damn overjoyed to be working again they basically throw their “project documentation” out the window and hope to never see it again!I talk in my blog and workbook, however, about the importance of this. It’s very easy to just let the project cease the moment you’ve got a job offer. Why is it important to spend at least a few hours formally “closing” the project out, however? Why is this important in a corporate setting?Not to bum you out, but statistically, you’ll go through this process again. So the knowledge capture you do now can definitely pay dividends down the road. What proactive steps can you take to position yourself for more success later on, should you need to go through a career transition again?
  • Here’s the final plug and what I’m all about, for those who don’t already knowAny final question or thoughts?
  • Social Media & Your Career: Realities?

    1. 1. Social Media & Your Career: What’s the Real Deal?<br />Presented by Matt Youngquist, Career Horizons<br />
    2. 2. If you’re attending this webinar, there’s a pretty good chance you’re not a social media expert. In which case, you’re probably wondering:<br />“Is it high time I jumped on this bandwagon?”<br />
    3. 3. “These social media sites are all just a bunch of hooey. I’m an experienced professional and I don’t have time to mess around with this stuff. I build relationships the old-fashioned way!” <br />
    4. 4. “You’re crazy! Social media is the new way everybody’s communicating, and if you’re not on the train, you’re under it. Get with the times or your career will suffer!” <br />
    5. 5. Five Practical Questions<br />Are social media sites…<br />Critical to learn as a marketable job skill?<br />Key to “being found” by employers/recruiters?<br />Useful for tracking down available job leads?<br />A great way to brand and differentiate yourself?<br />Essential to building and maintaining relationships?<br />
    6. 6. Question #1:Are social media sites criticalto learn as a marketable job skill?<br />
    7. 7. Answer: It depends on what you do for a living!<br /><ul><li>If you’re in sales, marketing, PR, media, or the HR/recruiting field, these sites are going to be (already are?) an essential job competency
    8. 8. If you’re in any other field, it’s probably not mandatoryyetfor you to master these tools
    9. 9. One great way to evaluate the importance of social media to your specific career field is to search the Trends section on Indeed.com using the formula: title:“your job title” AND (“social media” OR “social networking”)</li></ul>e.g. title:accountant AND (“social media” OR “social networking”)<br />
    10. 10. Do You Need to Know This Stuff?<br />Five years ago, there were almost no jobs that required social media experience; today, as you can see above, we’ve passed the 1% mark – and it’s unlikely this trend will be slowing down!<br />
    11. 11. Question #2:Are social media sites key to“being found” by employers/recruiters?<br />
    12. 12. Answer: Yes, and this is only going to grow!<br /><ul><li>A recent WSJ article says 80% employers are planning more social media usage in recruiting; 24% will decrease use of traditional job boards
    13. 13. Creating profiles on social media sites is a “fire and forget” strategy offering high potential return for a fairly minimal time investment
    14. 14. I recommend you create keyword-rich profiles on LinkedIn, Twitter, Google Profiles, Zoominfo, and individual job boards specific to your field
    15. 15. Facebook? Used mostly for informal reference checks, not direct sourcing. So it’s not essential to be on Facebook, but if you are, keep it clean!</li></li></ul><li>There are roughly 5,350<br />Sales Managers in the Seattle area who are on LinkedIn<br />Keywords are King!<br />Yet only 51 of them mention “contract negotiation” anywhere in their profile<br />Have you thought hard about the language, keywords, and terminology an eager recruiter would use to find you?<br />
    16. 16. Other top social networking sites to consider...<br /><ul><li>Myspace: Still big, but dwarfed by Facebook
    17. 17. Biznik: Focused on small businesses / consultants
    18. 18. Plaxo: Combines networking w/ address book
    19. 19. Bebo: Strong site in the UK, but might shut down
    20. 20. Orkut: Used heavily throughout India and Brazil
    21. 21. Xing: Big in Europe, especially Germany
    22. 22. Ning: Allows users to create own communities
    23. 23. Ecademy: Lots of users in the UK and India
    24. 24. Meetup: Facilitates group meetings and interaction</li></ul>Looking for a master list of all social networking sites? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_social_networking_websites<br />
    25. 25. Question #3:Are social media sites usefulfor finding published job leads?<br />
    26. 26. Answer: Not as much as you would think!<br /><ul><li>While the networking aspect of social media is huge, you won’t find many actual job leads
    27. 27. The vast majority of leads are much more easily findable via Indeed.com and Simplyhired.com
    28. 28. LinkedIn: Don’t be fooled; all leads in the “Jobs” section are immediately listed on SimplyHired
    29. 29. Facebook: BranchOut.com is the hot new career application, but mainly reposts Indeed ads
    30. 30. Twitter: Very limited pool of jobs; try searching on a job title followed by #job (e.g. CFO #job) or using Tweetmyjobs.com or Twitjobsearch.com</li></li></ul><li>Question #4:Are social media sites a great way to “brand” and differentiate yourself?<br />
    31. 31. Answer: Yes (but they can hurt your brand, too!)<br /><ul><li>Social media sites allow you to become known as a thought leader, influencer, and expert
    32. 32. Many professionals today, across all industries, showcase their expertise by frequently sharing their thoughts with others via social media
    33. 33. You might blog, tweet, create your own website, conduct podcasts, or form a LinkedIn group
    34. 34. TweetDeck.com and Hootsuite.com are two top tools for managing social networking activity
    35. 35. Reputation management is a growing concern; avoid bad press by Googling yourself and using social media search sites like SocialMention.com</li></li></ul><li>My friend Jeff is a master of<br />personal branding!<br />
    36. 36. Question #5:Are social media sites essential forbuilding/maintaining relationships?<br />
    37. 37. Answer: They’re the best thing ever invented!<br /><ul><li>In my eyes, this is unquestionably the #1 benefit of these sites from a career standpoint
    38. 38. They offer revolutionary ways to identify specific people and organizations relevant to your goals
    39. 39. The casual, quick nature of these sites allows you to maintain hundreds―or even thousands―of global relationships with minimal effort
    40. 40. Social media is perfect for introverts; allows for safe, thoughtful, meaningful dialogue
    41. 41. You’ll find, though, people tend to rally around their favorite tool, so you may have to commit to communicating via multiple channels</li></li></ul><li>Great for maintaining healthy relationships…<br />Social media sites make it a snap to keep in touch with numerous contacts. For example, you can:<br /><ul><li>Invite people you know to connect
    42. 42. Forward profiles from one person to another
    43. 43. Join on-line groups and communities
    44. 44. “Like” the comments a person makes
    45. 45. Route relevant articles or job leads along
    46. 46. Submit testimonials or recommendations
    47. 47. Share and tag photos/videos of a person
    48. 48. Ask questions; or answer them from others
    49. 49. Update people on your current status and goals</li></li></ul><li>Tips for finding people on the top three sites…<br />Facebook:Ironically, Google is the best place to search for people on Facebook, using a search phrase such as:site:facebook.com (investment advisor) (Seattle, WA) Twitter:Use the Twellow.com directory to find specific users (make sure to read the “advanced search tips” link); also pay attention to who other people followLinkedIn:The “Advanced People Search” page offers amazing ways to track down the exact types of people you want to locate; blows everything else away<br />
    50. 50. Also, social media users like their egos stroked!<br />Another secret? Most of the people who tweet, blog, and use social media to promote themselves LOVE feedback on their work. So don’t be afraid to contact them, apply a bit of flattery, and ask some pertinent questions. The results may surprise you!<br />“Peter: We haven’t met, but I was doing some research on Conenzia and stumbled across your blog posting about the company. Great stuff! I’m currently preparing for an upcoming interview with them and trying to learn more about their corporate culture. Any chance I could give you a quick call or drop you an e-mail to get your thoughts?”<br />
    51. 51. Final Thoughts<br />Social media is going to be<br />the mainstream way that people<br />communicate with other<br />just a few short years from now.<br />So while these sites are not yet mandatory for career success, outside of a few specific fields, taking a few small steps to learn these tools today is a smart idea – and agreat insurance policy.<br />Any questions?<br />
    52. 52. www.career-horizons.com<br />[free blog]<br />[free newsletter]<br />[professional career coaching]<br />[resume writing]<br />[corporate outplacement]<br />

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