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Creative Commons for Tertiary Education
 

Creative Commons for Tertiary Education

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Given to Wintec in Hamilton, New Zealand on 5 February 2014, this presentation provides a simple introduction to Creative Commons licensing. It also introduces moves towards open access to scholarly ...

Given to Wintec in Hamilton, New Zealand on 5 February 2014, this presentation provides a simple introduction to Creative Commons licensing. It also introduces moves towards open access to scholarly research and open educational resources in New Zealand and around the world.

This presentation was accompanied by a broad discussion about how CC licensing could be used at New Zealand tertiary institutions.

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    Creative Commons for Tertiary Education Creative Commons for Tertiary Education Presentation Transcript

    • Creative Commons for Wintec 4 Feb 2014
    • Questions to mull over: 1. What kinds of copyright works are produced at Wintec? 2. What kinds of copyright works are used at Wintec?
    • 1 1. Licences More free More restrictive
    • 2. Advocacy Projects
    • Our goal: “Universal access to research and education, full participation in culture.”
    • First point: It’s becoming much easier to access and reuse works online.
    • Second point: It hasn't always been easy to build on other works.
    • Family watching television, c. 1958. National Archives and Records Administration. 1944 – 2006. No known copyright.
    • Third point: The technical barriers to access and reuse are dropping
    • Screenshot from ‘Lego Life Lessons - Safety Tips for Walking to School’ by the Manning Brothers. Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike licence.
    • Fourth point: Obvious potential to share items for reuse
    • Getty Museum Closed:121 Purchases p/m Open: 60,000 downloads p/m Claude-Joseph Vernet (French, 1714 - 1789) A Calm at a Mediterranean Port, 1770, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles
    • Fifth point: Taxpayers fund a great deal of New Zealand copyright works (many of which quickly fall from circulation).
    • Sixth point: The legal barriers to dissemination & reuse remain.
    • “Stop” by Brainware 3000. CC-BY. Via Flickr.
    • Copyright is: Bundle of rights Automatic Copy, distribute, perform, adapt *applies online* Lasts for 50 years after death
    • Copyright the opportunities and problems of print culture “Caxton Showing the First Specimen of His Printing to King Edward IV at the Almonry, Westminster,” by Daniel Maclise, 1851.
    • Heald, Paul J., How Copyright Makes Books and Music Disappear (and How Secondary Liability Rules Help Resurrect Old Songs) (July 5, 2013). Illinois Program in Law, Behavior and Social Science Paper No. LBSS14-07; Illinois Public Law Research Paper No. 13-54. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2290181 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2290181
    • What to do? “Grayson, Westley, Stanislaus County, Western San Joaquin Valley, California. Seventh and eighth grade class in Westley school after lesson in Geography” 1940, US National Archives 83G-41445, via Flickr. No known copyright.
    • Licence = Permission Creators retain copyright Standardised Internationally recognised & used (and free!)
    • Public Domain Few Restrictions
    • Public Domain Few Restrictions All Rights Reserved Few Freedoms
    • Public Domain Few Restrictions Some Rights Reserved Range of Licence Options All Rights Reserved Few Freedoms
    • Four Licence Elements
    • Attribution
    • Non Commercial
    • No Derivatives
    • Share Alike
    • Six Licences
    • More free More restrictive
    • More free More restrictive
    • More free More restrictive
    • More free More restrictive
    • More free More restrictive
    • More free More restrictive
    • More free More restrictive
    • Go to creativecommons.org/choose
    • CC Kiwi by Creative Commons Aotearoa New Zealand is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand Licence.
    • The Remix Kiwi by CCANZ is based on a work by Creative Commons Aotearoa New Zealand [LINK], which is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand Licence.
    • Layers Lawyer readable Human readable Licence symboll
    • More than 700 million works. “2500 Creative Commons Licences” by qthomasbower, via Flickr. Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 licence.
    • https://docs.google.com/document/d/1cIW mV5nCF8o97Nrb8wYZWfQ97FG4ylNuXezh2nlBBM/edit
    • Questions to mull over: 1. What kinds of copyright works are produced at Wintec? 2. What kinds of copyright works are used at Wintec?
    • 1. How can Wintec open copyright works it produces?
    • 1. How can Wintec open copyright works it produces? 2. What's being done to open up copyright works that Wintec uses?
    • Free, open-licensed research outputs – to be used by everyone in the world, because...
    • 1.Most publicly funded research cannot be accessed by the public
    • This restricts the dissemination of knowledge to the people who need it most.
    • “I am an independent researcher from a third world country not affiliated to any university or a company. Thus I neither have access to paid journals nor I can afford them” – independent research, Nepal. Source: MIT Library
    • “I don’t have access to many articles due to … sanctions. … I really appreciate this policy of MIT that helped me a lot.” – Researcher, Middle East Source: MIT Library
    • “I am an independent researcher, with no current academic affiliation. I am writing a book which involves researching topological quantum neural computing.... Thank you for making science freely available to all!” – Scientific journalist, US Source: MIT Library
    • 2. Libraries are struggling. From 1986-2007, subscription charges increased by 340%, four times the rate of inflation
    • “We write to communicate an untenable situation facing the Harvard Library. Many large journal publishers have made the scholarly communication environment fiscally unsustainable and academically restrictive.”
    • 3. Higher education is struggling to make the case for more public funding
    • 4. Most publicly funded research cannot be reused by the public
    • All Rights Reserved copyright What many common restrictsis Copyright? & essential uses of research
    • Distribution to students, colleagues, journalists, businesses. Reuse by other researchers, What is Copyright? bloggers, journalists, publishers. Republication to new audiences Translation to other languages
    • Also, without open licensing, your (publicly funded) work may not enter the commons for over 100 years (...)
    • …which makes life very hard for libraries and archives who want to give your work a second life. Exhibit A:
    • Solution: Open Access
    • Open Access policies from public funding bodies in all major English-speaking countries, EU & many Latin American & Asia countries
    • OK, but what does ‘open’ even mean?
    • 1. Access: 2. Technical: 3. Copyright:
    • 1. Access: Green and Gold 2. Technical: Open Formats 3. Copyright: Open Licensing
    • Access Green: Deposit post-print, peer-reviewed article in an institutional or disciplinary repository
    • Access Green: Deposit post-print, peer-reviewed article in an institutional or disciplinary repository Gold: Article is made freely available by publisher (sometimes after APC charge)
    • 2. Technical Use of open formats, to allow others to share, adapt and reuse research (including data)
    • 3. Copyright Use of open licensing, to allow others to share, adapt and reuse research (including data)
    • [We haven't mentioned open data, open science, open peer review]
    • Free, open-licensed teaching resources – to be used by everyone in the world, because...
    • 1. Textbooks, often publicly funded, are too expensive
    • Between 2002 and 2013, the price of college textbooks rose 82% — nearly three times the rate of inflation
    • Solution: Open Textbooks
    • Solution: Open Textbooks
    • Solution: Open Textbooks
    • Solution: Open Textbooks
    • 2. Too many teachers reinvent the wheel.
    • This is an enormous waste of time and money, across the entire New Zealand education system.
    • Solution: Online Sharing Portals
    • 3. We can't build enough universities to meet global demand
    • “Accommodating the additional 98 million students would require more than four major universities (30,000 students) to open every week for the next fifteen years.” Stamenka Uvalić-Trumbić of UNESCO Source: Brandenburg, U., Carr, D., Donauer, S., Berthold, C. (2008) Analysing the Future Market – Target Countries for German HEIs, Working paper No. 107, CHE Centre for Higher Education Development, Gütersloh, Germany, p. 13.
    • Solution: Open Higher Education.
    • What can you do?
    • QUESTIONS? creativecommons.org.nz @cc_Aotearoa admin@creativecommons.org.nz groups.creativecommons.org.nz This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 New Zealand License.