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Integrated Curriculum
What is Integration? <ul><li>Problems, concerns real to the student and real in the community.  </li></ul><ul><li>Students...
What is Integration? <ul><li>Develop essential skills intrinsic to their learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Key skills may be for...
What is Integration? <ul><li>Programmes which are genuinely integrative: </li></ul><ul><li>Based on topics of substance an...
Principles of Curriculum Integration <ul><li>Making  connections and seeing real purposes for their learning. </li></ul><u...
Principles of Curriculum Integration <ul><li>Learning builds, extends and expands a student's personal knowledge and exper...
The Curriculum Continuum 3 Separate Subject Separate topics Traditional Separate subjects share a common theme. Multi-Disc...
How to integrate <ul><li>Two themes emerge from many reviews of curriculum design; </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Coherence </l...
Beane’s Planning Model <ul><li>1. Individuals list questions & concerns about self. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Small groups meet...
Role of the teacher <ul><li>Shift of the teacher from the ‘gatekeeper’ to ‘guide’ or ‘facilitator’ 2  or ‘sage on the stag...
Inquiry Method Brainstorm/Mind Map Question Generation Fertile Test Question Selection
Inquiry Method Hypothesis Sub-questions Research Conclusion
Last Word <ul><li>Curriculum integration is not a package that will work perfectly for every school. Rather it is a philos...
Bibliography <ul><li>Bean, J.,  Integrated Curriculum in the Middle School. ERIC Digest.  ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary...
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Integrated curriculum

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  • Discuss readings, Share key understandings, teachers jot key words or ideas and put up The process of experiencing and understanding connections and, because of this, seeing things whole. Students take problems and concerns real to the student and real in the community as the essential building blocks (topics for study) of the curriculum. Students and teachers work together to select the specific topic of interest to them and together they plan how, when, where and why they will pursue it. The focus is on active student participation and decision making. Together with their teacher and individually, the students explore or investigate the issue in order to understand it better and to perhaps propose a solution, suggest a new direction and report their results to a significant audience.
  • Teachers, as enablers and facilitators, focus on helping students to develop essential skills intrinsic to their study and learning. Key skills may be formulating questions, creating hypotheses, working out ways to collect data, and reporting on what has been learned. Subject content and knowledge comes into play after, rather than before, deciding what is to be studied and how.
  • Are based on topics of substance and significance; Place an emphasis on students seeing connections in and purposes for learning; Develop big ideas that excite the imagination of students and teachers alike; Develop desire for the learning process to be active and participatory; Develop skills and knowledge in contexts real to the students; Build on and extend a student’s personal knowledge and experience; and develop sustained programmes or work in contrast to one-off, unrelated lessons.
  • Curriculum Integration is about students making connections and seeing real purposes for their learning. Programmes of work are based in topics of substance and significance. Programmes of work are linked to problems and issues that are of personal and social concern to students. Learning experiences develop big ideas that excite and challenge the imagination of students and teachers alike. Students are actively involved in negotiating the content and direction of their learning within a framework developed with the teacher. Knowledge, skills, values and attitudes are all integrated within authentic contexts.
  • Learning builds, extends and expands a student&apos;s personal knowledge and experience. Learning experiences are open-ended and provide for a range of learning styles. The process of learning is as equally valued as the product of learning. Reflection is built into programmes of work, so that learners are encouraged to continually discuss and develop their thinking and planning. Curriculum Integration builds sustained programmes of work in contrast to one-off unrelated lessons. There are a range of possible approaches to Curriculum Integration, stretching from &apos;correlation between subjects&apos; to &apos;student centred inquiry and problem solving&apos;.
  • Discuss where individual teachers sit along the continuum
  • Teachers, as enablers and facilitators, focus on helping students to develop essential skills intrinsic to their study and learning. Key skills may be formulating questions, creating hypotheses, working out ways to collect data, and reporting on what has been learned. Subject content and knowledge comes into play after, rather than before, deciding what is to be studied and how.
  • Teachers follow model using context of (using context of ‘using Earth’s resources wisely’) NOTE: We do not follow this and cannot as the school determines the context DO WE INCLUDE??
  • Where do teachers sit on continuum?
  • Students brainstorm as many ideas as they can for the given learning context. This can be done as a whole class, group or independent exercise. Students generate open questions under each of the following headings: personal, family, community, national, international, cultural. Students test each of their questions to see if they are: Connected, Rich, Charged, Practical, Open, Undermining Students select the best question for their personal study using tournament prioritiser or venn diagrams or other graphic organisers.
  • Students complete the template in which they create and plan sub-questions using Bloom’s taxonomy. For each sub-question they think about different ways in which they can present their learning using different multiple intelligences. These become their learning experiences. Students carry out their research Students write their conclusion where they aim to answer their fertile question or take action on their ‘so what’ and reflect upon their learning. Paragraphs could be written about: Why I chose this study, what I wanted to find out, what I found out for each sub-question, what I did well, things I could improve on, my goals for next time etc.
  • Transcript of "Integrated curriculum"

    1. 1. Integrated Curriculum
    2. 2. What is Integration? <ul><li>Problems, concerns real to the student and real in the community. </li></ul><ul><li>Students and teachers work together to select the specific topic of interest to them and together they plan how, when, where and why they will pursue it. </li></ul><ul><li>Active student participation and decision making. </li></ul><ul><li>Explore issue to understand and to propose a solution, suggest a new direction and report their results. </li></ul>
    3. 3. What is Integration? <ul><li>Develop essential skills intrinsic to their learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Key skills may be formulating questions, creating hypotheses, working out ways to collect data, and reporting on what has been learned. </li></ul><ul><li>Subject content and knowledge comes into play after, rather than before, deciding what is to be studied and how. </li></ul>
    4. 4. What is Integration? <ul><li>Programmes which are genuinely integrative: </li></ul><ul><li>Based on topics of substance and significance; </li></ul><ul><li>Place an emphasis on seeing connections in and purposes for learning; </li></ul><ul><li>Develop big ideas that excite the imagination. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop desire for the learning process </li></ul><ul><li>Develop skills and knowledge that are real to the student. </li></ul><ul><li>Build on and extend knowledge and experience </li></ul><ul><li>Develop sustained programmes or work. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Principles of Curriculum Integration <ul><li>Making connections and seeing real purposes for their learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Based in topics of substance and significance. </li></ul><ul><li>Linked to problems and issues that are of personal and social concern to students. </li></ul><ul><li>Learning experiences develop big ideas that excite and challenge the imagination. </li></ul><ul><li>Actively involved in negotiating the content and direction of their learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge, skills, values and attitudes are all integrated. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Principles of Curriculum Integration <ul><li>Learning builds, extends and expands a student's personal knowledge and experience. </li></ul><ul><li>Open-ended and provide for a range of learning styles. </li></ul><ul><li>Process of learning valued as the product of learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Reflection is built into programmes of work </li></ul><ul><li>Sustained programmes of work in contrast to one-off unrelated lessons. </li></ul><ul><li>Range of possible approaches to Curriculum Integration </li></ul>
    7. 7. The Curriculum Continuum 3 Separate Subject Separate topics Traditional Separate subjects share a common theme. Multi-Disciplinary Inter-Disciplinary Team chooses common theme with some overlap of subjects No separate subjects, theme selected by teacher Integrated Integrative Beyond? No separate subject, students determine themes Interactive, Independent, Technology-based?
    8. 8. How to integrate <ul><li>Two themes emerge from many reviews of curriculum design; </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Coherence </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Permeability </li></ul></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Beane’s Planning Model <ul><li>1. Individuals list questions & concerns about self. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Small groups meet to list common questions & concerns about self. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Student lists questions & concerns about the world. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Small groups meet to record common questions & concerns about the world. </li></ul><ul><li>5. Small groups review both lists of common questions & concerns. Groups look for connections or similar ideas to brainstorm themes. </li></ul><ul><li>6. Small groups report out lists of themes. Common themes are recorded; using consensus, the class chooses a theme for the first unit. </li></ul>7. Discuss givens and expectations: what do students need to know and must be able to do? 8. Students plan projects and activities based on common theme and the “givens.”
    10. 10. Role of the teacher <ul><li>Shift of the teacher from the ‘gatekeeper’ to ‘guide’ or ‘facilitator’ 2 or ‘sage on the stage’ to ‘guide on the side’. </li></ul>Leader-centered - leader active - learner passive Content emphasis Exposition Inquiry Learner-centered - leader facilitates - learner active Process emphasis
    11. 11. Inquiry Method Brainstorm/Mind Map Question Generation Fertile Test Question Selection
    12. 12. Inquiry Method Hypothesis Sub-questions Research Conclusion
    13. 13. Last Word <ul><li>Curriculum integration is not a package that will work perfectly for every school. Rather it is a philosophy and ideal of true democracy that we should strive toward in our classrooms and schools. It is far from easy, and teachers have many legitimate questions about how to make such a program work. Instead of focusing on the nuts and bolts of the perfect model of curriculum integration, consider the goal: a democratic education that provides real learning opportunities and respect for the great diversity of human needs. – James Beane </li></ul>
    14. 14. Bibliography <ul><li>Bean, J., Integrated Curriculum in the Middle School. ERIC Digest. ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education Urbana IL,1991 </li></ul><ul><li>Bean, J., Curriculum Integration, Designing the Core of Democratic Education </li></ul><ul><li>Brazee, Ed & Capelluti, Jody. Dissolving Boundaries: Toward an Integrative Curriculum. Columbus, OH: National Middle School Association, 1995. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.tki.org.nz/r/integration/interact/communicate/faqs/faqs_e.php </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding Curriculum Integration, http://www.lea.co.nz/citest/whatis/robot/themovie.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Reflection of teaching processes http://www.lea.co.nz/citest/reflection4print.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Using a Variety of Teaching Methods and Strategies http://porkinfo.osu.edu/Word%20Documents/cantrel.continuum.teaching.methods.doc </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiating Curriculum to Build a Democratic Classroom http://coehd.umeedu.maine.edu/manila/gems/mlei/PlanningWithStudents.cwkPR.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Kordalewski, J., Incorporating Student Voice into Teaching Practice . ERIC Clearinghouse on Teaching and Teacher Education Washington DC., 1999 </li></ul><ul><li>Duerr, L., Interdisciplinary Insrtuction. h ttp://www.pilambda.org/horizons/v86-3/duerr.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>The Beane/Brodhagan Model of Negotiated Integrated Curriculum http://coe.winthrop.edu/blackburnb/EDCI%20600/Beane.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>TRANSDISCIPLINARY INQUIRY incorporating holistic principles. http://www.hent.org/transdisciplinary.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.ncsu.edu/chass/extension/ci/beaneonci.html </li></ul>

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