Conceptions of Geospatial information:  Implications for Information Literacy Education Maryam Nazari  University of Sheff...
Overview  <ul><li>The study background </li></ul><ul><li>Methodology </li></ul><ul><li>Conceptions of Geospatial informati...
Information literacy <ul><li>A set of competencies which helps individuals: </li></ul><ul><li>to recognize when they have ...
Two big questions IL in  the GIS ODL What does IL mean in disciplinary areas? How can it  be illuminated? Competencies nee...
A rationale for this study Information  Literacy Education What does it mean in disciplinary areas? How can it  be illumin...
Methodology  Real  information and learning needs Perceptions, and  teaching  and learning experiences of,  GIS and geo/sp...
Exploration of  Geospatial information conceptions <ul><li>Data collection </li></ul><ul><li>In-depth, semi-structured int...
Conceptions of GI Spatial Temporal Spatially Technology-mediated Spatially  contextualised Geospatial  information
Conceptions of GI - 1 Spatial Geospatial  information Location  Attributes Locational (e.g. name of streets, postal codes)...
Conceptions of GI - 2 Temporal Geospatial  information It represents features of the earth in certain point(s) of  time It...
Conceptions of GI - 3 Spatially  contextualised  Geospatial  information needs to be spatially conceptualised and contextu...
Conceptions of GI - 4 Spatially  technology-mediated  Geospatial  information GI is readable and usable by GIS It needs to...
Forms of mediation Formation Manipulate Analysis Handle Communicate Map Apply  Display Overlay Transformation Organise To ...
User input
Forms of user input  and needed competencies Conception User input Competencies C1- Spatial Spatial way of thinking of GI ...
Forms of user input  and needed competencies Conception User input Competencies C3- Spatially- contextualised <ul><li>Cont...
Forms of user input  and needed competencies Conception User input Competencies C4- Spatially technology-mediated <ul><li>...
Implications <ul><li>Librarians and information literacy experts </li></ul><ul><li>To move from generic IL models (e.g. Bi...
<ul><li>GIS educators </li></ul><ul><li>The variation in the ways of perceiving GI calls for an IL approach that: </li></u...
<ul><li>Ms. Sheila Webber (my supervisor in Sheffield) </li></ul><ul><li>Dr. Robin S. Smith (my GIS advisor in the ICOSS) ...
Thank you very much     <ul><li>Questions?  </li></ul><ul><li>Please refer to: </li></ul><ul><li>Nazari, Maryam, and Shei...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Conceptions of geospatial information: implications for information literacy education

720

Published on

According to Nazari's contextual methodological model emerged from her PhD study, people's conceptions and experiences of information in real-life contexts play a key role in illuminating competencies they need to effectively make sense of, and use information.
In this presentation, Nazari presents four conceptions of geospatial information as emerged from the conceptions of a group of GIS educators and students in a joint online distance learning GIS partnership programme in the UK and US.
Drawing on the conceptions, she presents several competencies identified in the context of each conception and discusses their implications for information literacy education.
Hope you find it useful :)

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
720
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Conceptions of geospatial information: implications for information literacy education

  1. 1. Conceptions of Geospatial information: Implications for Information Literacy Education Maryam Nazari University of Sheffield Department of Information Studies Information Literacy: Research and Strategy Seminar, Centre for Information Literacy Research, University of Sheffield, March 2008
  2. 2. Overview <ul><li>The study background </li></ul><ul><li>Methodology </li></ul><ul><li>Conceptions of Geospatial information </li></ul><ul><li>Implications for information literacy education </li></ul>
  3. 3. Information literacy <ul><li>A set of competencies which helps individuals: </li></ul><ul><li>to recognize when they have a need for information </li></ul><ul><li>to determine their information need and their needed information </li></ul><ul><li>to find, evaluate, and use information effectively </li></ul>Learning how to learn  lifelong learning
  4. 4. Two big questions IL in the GIS ODL What does IL mean in disciplinary areas? How can it be illuminated? Competencies needed to accomplish GIS tasks Nature and characteristics of GIS discipline To explore real learning and teaching experiences Various meaning and conceptions Various meaning and conceptions To explore real learning and teaching experiences
  5. 5. A rationale for this study Information Literacy Education What does it mean in disciplinary areas? How can it be illuminated? Competencies needed to accomplish information and learning tasks Nature and characteristics of GIS Some other disciplines but NOT Geographic Information System/ Science (GIS) Phenomenography and Survey but NOT Exploratory Case Study Librarians but FEW Academics and educators Face to face but NOT Online Distance Learning (ODL) programs
  6. 6. Methodology Real information and learning needs Perceptions, and teaching and learning experiences of, GIS and geo/spatial information Real IL educational needs An embedded exploratory case study Identify Explore - Academics and students - 30 GIS ODL courses - 3 ODL programs - semi-structured interview - questionnaire - students’ reflection - document study - To identify competencies GIS students need: a) to be able to find, evaluate, and use geospatial information; b) to solve problems geo/spatially Explore
  7. 7. Exploration of Geospatial information conceptions <ul><li>Data collection </li></ul><ul><li>In-depth, semi-structured interviews with 27 academics and 7 students </li></ul><ul><li>Questions </li></ul><ul><li>How would you describe geospatial information (GI) and what makes it unique? </li></ul><ul><li>How would you describe the physical format of GI? </li></ul><ul><li>Data analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Grounded theory methods </li></ul>
  8. 8. Conceptions of GI Spatial Temporal Spatially Technology-mediated Spatially contextualised Geospatial information
  9. 9. Conceptions of GI - 1 Spatial Geospatial information Location Attributes Locational (e.g. name of streets, postal codes) Non-locational (e.g. diseases, pollution, sand, water etc) Represents the earth feature Information about the location Information about the target phenomenon in the location
  10. 10. Conceptions of GI - 2 Temporal Geospatial information It represents features of the earth in certain point(s) of time It is about a dynamic-temporal phenomenon i.e. the earth It has a life span e.g. census data
  11. 11. Conceptions of GI - 3 Spatially contextualised Geospatial information needs to be spatially conceptualised and contextualised socially and geographically constructed phenomenon
  12. 12. Conceptions of GI - 4 Spatially technology-mediated Geospatial information GI is readable and usable by GIS It needs to be formed and transformed - x,y,z coordinates; - latitude-longitude; - spatial identifier GI is originally in any format - Text ; e.g. names of streets, lakes etc - Number ; e.g. table of census data, columns of spreadsheet etc - Visual formats ; e.g. maps, graphs, digital maps and images, scanned aerial photographs etc. but readable and usable in certain formats
  13. 13. Forms of mediation Formation Manipulate Analysis Handle Communicate Map Apply Display Overlay Transformation Organise To make sense of GI To make use of GI With the involvement of spatially and non-spatially enabled technologies and tools
  14. 14. User input
  15. 15. Forms of user input and needed competencies Conception User input Competencies C1- Spatial Spatial way of thinking of GI - To conceptualise GI as a spatial phenomenon - To understand, visualise, represent GI as 3-D information C2- Temporal Spatial and temporal way of thinking of GI - To conceptualise GI as a dynamic and temporal phenomenon - To understand, visualise, represent GI as 4-D information
  16. 16. Forms of user input and needed competencies Conception User input Competencies C3- Spatially- contextualised <ul><li>Contribution to the formation and making sense of GI as socially and geographically constructed information </li></ul><ul><li>Contribution to the contextualisation of the data spatially </li></ul>- To have awareness of this feature of GI - To have knowledge of the contextual issues around the GI - To conceptualise and contextualise GI as a spatial and temporal phenomenon within its social and geographical context - To apply the GI as spatially-contextualised information for various purposes e.g. making plans, decisions etc
  17. 17. Forms of user input and needed competencies Conception User input Competencies C4- Spatially technology-mediated <ul><li>Contribution to the spatial formation and transformation of GI in the forms of various cognitive and operational activities </li></ul>- To understand the way that technology (GIS) perceives GI - To select appropriate operations to form and transform GI - To evaluate and select appropriate spatially and non-spatially enabled tools and technologies for certain operations and purposes - To use various spatially and non-spatially enabled tools and technologies
  18. 18. Implications <ul><li>Librarians and information literacy experts </li></ul><ul><li>To move from generic IL models (e.g. Big6, SCONUL, ACRL) toward a specified IL framework which meets the specific needs of GIS learners </li></ul><ul><li>To enable students to identify their information and learning needs by thinking and questioning critically </li></ul><ul><li>To re-think the construction of IL tutorials </li></ul>
  19. 19. <ul><li>GIS educators </li></ul><ul><li>The variation in the ways of perceiving GI calls for an IL approach that: </li></ul><ul><li>makes students aware of the user input element and enables them to diagnose their information and learning needs </li></ul><ul><li>enhances the GIS curriculum by integrating the competencies explicitly in the GIS course objectives </li></ul><ul><li>facilitates students learn how to interact with, and use, GI more effectively within technological environments (ODL) </li></ul>Implications – cont.
  20. 20. <ul><li>Ms. Sheila Webber (my supervisor in Sheffield) </li></ul><ul><li>Dr. Robin S. Smith (my GIS advisor in the ICOSS) </li></ul><ul><li>Mr. David DiBiase (my advisor in Penn State) </li></ul><ul><li>Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) - Global exchange program award </li></ul><ul><li>The John Campbell Trust – CILIP </li></ul><ul><li>GIS instructors and students in the Universities of Leeds and Southampton, and Pennsylvania State University </li></ul>University of Sheffield Department of Information Studies The John Campbell Trust Global Exchange Program Award
  21. 21. Thank you very much  <ul><li>Questions? </li></ul><ul><li>Please refer to: </li></ul><ul><li>Nazari, Maryam, and Sheila Webber. 2008. Conceptions of geospatial information: implications for information literacy education. Presented in: IADIS Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems 2008, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 22 – 27 July. </li></ul>
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×