<ul><ul><li>In my Father's footsteps to the Western Front... </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trip of a lifetime, and the role o...
Some background on Canadian Operations in the Western Front... <ul><li>Canadian Corps: </li></ul><ul><li>commander in 1916...
Background - Notes <ul><li>let me just take a slight pause at this point, so that I can bring you up to speed on the Canad...
 
 
 
 
Battle  for Regina Trench 28 September – 1 October, 1916
Battle  for Regina Trench 28 September – 1 October, 1916
Battle for Regina Trench - Notes
Stuck in for Winter 1916-17...
Stuck in for winter - Notes
 
<ul><li>Now we come to  Vimy Ridge  – where perhaps the most well-known of Canadian Corps battles took place  </li></ul><u...
Battle of Vimy Ridge   April 9-12 1917
Battle of Vimy Ridge - Notes
Battle of Vimy Ridge...
Battle of Vimy Ridge - Notes
 
 
To be continued... in Part 3
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

In My Father's Footsteps to the Western Front - Part 2

1,202 views

Published on

A presentation (in 5 parts) about my Father's experiences as an officer in the 26th Battalion (New Brunswick), Canadian Expeditionary Force, during WW1 and my attempt to follow in his footsteps 90 years later, Some spooky things happened along the way, as I learned about the battalion's activities and where he, and it, had been in those years between 1916 and 1919.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,202
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
15
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • In My Father's Footsteps to the Western Front - Part 2

    1. 1. <ul><ul><li>In my Father's footsteps to the Western Front... </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trip of a lifetime, and the role of serendipity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Part 2 of 5 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mary Anne Sharpe </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>November 2007 </li></ul></ul>
    2. 2. Some background on Canadian Operations in the Western Front... <ul><li>Canadian Corps: </li></ul><ul><li>commander in 1916 was Lt-General Sir Julian Byng, a British regular with service in South Africa </li></ul><ul><li>four Infantry Divisions (5 Brigades each) commanded by three Canadians who had served with the Non-Permanent Active Militia (i.e. they were civilians), and one British regular; also brigades of artillery, cavalry,engineers, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>had been in the field between 2 years and 8 months </li></ul><ul><li>26 th Battalion (New Brunswick): </li></ul><ul><li>one of 4 battalions in the 5 th Brigade of the 2 nd Division; others were 22 nd (VanDoos), 24 th (Victoria Rifles, Montreal), and 25 th (Nova Scotia)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>roughly 1000 men at full strength; by mid-September, 1916 at less than 2/3 strength </li></ul><ul><li>had been in the field for one year </li></ul>
    3. 3. Background - Notes <ul><li>let me just take a slight pause at this point, so that I can bring you up to speed on the Canadian Operations in the Western Front up to the point that my father arrived there... </li></ul><ul><li>- the Canadian Corps had been fighting as a unit within the British Army since the beginning of the war </li></ul><ul><li>- by 1916, it had become largely a &quot;citizens' army&quot;, and had been handed to Sir Julian Byng to command (he was heard to remark something like &quot;Why me?! I don't even know any Canadians!&quot; ) - by mid-1917 & to war's end in 1919, it would be commanded by Sir Arthur Currie – a Canadian </li></ul><ul><li>- the Canadian Corps had already a reputation as tenacious fighters </li></ul><ul><li>- Byng expected that every man would be prepared for whatever upcoming assault, and encouraged discussion of proposed plans among his officers </li></ul><ul><li>- this all suited the Canadians' somewhat independent way... </li></ul><ul><li>- the 26 th Battalion had by then earned the title &quot;the fighting 26 th &quot;, having a whole year's experience in the field, although they had suffered the loss of more than 1/3 of their number </li></ul>
    4. 8. Battle for Regina Trench 28 September – 1 October, 1916
    5. 9. Battle for Regina Trench 28 September – 1 October, 1916
    6. 10. Battle for Regina Trench - Notes
    7. 11. Stuck in for Winter 1916-17...
    8. 12. Stuck in for winter - Notes
    9. 14. <ul><li>Now we come to Vimy Ridge – where perhaps the most well-known of Canadian Corps battles took place </li></ul><ul><li>- the Ridge was an important geographical feature that had been held by the Germans since 1915 </li></ul><ul><li>- it's a steep whaleback running roughly northwest-to-southeast, its highest point being at Hill 145 at a height of about 270 feet above the Douai Plain lying to the northeast </li></ul><ul><li>these modern-day photographs show the Ridge and help illustrate its importance as a feature that dominates the area: </li></ul><ul><li>the top photograph shows the ridge from the East with the monument on top of Hill 145 </li></ul><ul><li>the bottom photograph -- is the Douai Plain, looking Northeastward and down from Hill 145 towards the city of Lens and the Double Crassier , the twin slag heaps that have been a feature of this landscape for more than 90 years... </li></ul>
    10. 15. Battle of Vimy Ridge April 9-12 1917
    11. 16. Battle of Vimy Ridge - Notes
    12. 17. Battle of Vimy Ridge...
    13. 18. Battle of Vimy Ridge - Notes
    14. 21. To be continued... in Part 3

    ×