Parts of Speech Quiz
Inferencing – 2.1.a
OBJECTIVE: SWBAT demonstrate knowledge of
parts of speech on a matching and compo...
Inference:
• A judgment based on reasoning rather than on
direct or explicit statement,
• A conclusion based on facts or c...
INFERENCE FORMAT:
The evidence of
_____________________________________
suggests
____________________________________.
OBJ...
What can you infer based on this photo?
The evidence
__________________,
suggests that
__________________
________________...
What can you tell based on this
photo?
The evidence
____________
______,
suggests that
____________
____________
_________...
What can you tell based on this
photo?
The evidence
_____________
_____, suggests
that
_____________
_____________
_______...
What can you tell based on this
photo?
The evidence
______________
____, suggests
that
______________
______________
_____...
What can you tell based on this
photo?
The evidence
___________
_______,
suggests that
___________
___________
___________...
What can you tell based on this
photo?
The evidence
___________
_______,
suggests that
___________
___________
___________...
What can you tell based on this
photo?
The evidence
___________
_______,
suggests that
___________
___________
___________...
What can you tell based on this
photo?
The evidence
____________
______,
suggests that
____________
____________
_________...
What can you tell based on this
photo?
The evidence
__________________,
suggests that
____________________
_______________...
What are we supposed to
assume in this clip?
• And how is this inference then turned
around on us?
• Based on _____
• I as...
When you make inferences about a
text you should:
• Never lose sight of the available information
(base your inferences on...
There are two strong influences on the content of dreams. One influence is the
time of your dream. When you are closest to...
Explanations
a) The statement in answer a is not supported at all. The passage discusses when and
what people dream not ho...
(1) A twenty-eight-year-old woman named Catherine Genovese was
returning home from work one day. (2) Kitty, as she was cal...
(1) A twenty-eight-year-old woman named Catherine Genovese was
returning home from work one day. (2) Kitty, as she was cal...
(1) A twenty-eight-year-old woman named Catherine Genovese was
returning home from work one day. (2) Kitty, as she was cal...
“The Hawk and the Buzzard” (African American Folk Tale)
You know de hawk and de buzzard was settin' up in a pine tree one ...
“The Manner in Which We Eat”
Just as people’s taste in food differs from one part of the globe to another, people’s table ...
We all have prior experiences to
connect our reading to
• http://youtu.be/ho6DCYggFKo
OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences fro...
Open your books to “102 Minutes:
The Untold Story of the Fight to
Survive Inside the Twin Towers”
As we read, we will be w...
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Inferencing Lesson

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Students make inferences using a sentence stem to guide. Mostly visual inferences using photographs

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  • The answer to the first question is b. We have solid evidence that Genovese was attacked in her neighborhood; she was returning home from work and had parked her car. Because she was returning home from work, she was not on vacation. Also, we know she had just parked her car after coming home from work. So the attack could not have taken place before she got into the car to go home.
  • The answer to the second question is b. We can conclude that Genovese’s attacker wanted to kill her. If his goal was to rob or rape her, he could have doe so long before the last time he stabbed her. And no evidence in the passage indicated that Genovese knew her attacker. Finally, although we cannot be sure the attacker was ever convicted of a crime, there is absolutely no evidence in the passage to support that conclusion – his past in not referred to at all.
  • The answer to the third question is a. The crime took at least a half hour; thus we can conclude that if the police had been called, there is a chance they would have arrived in time to save Genovese. However, we have no reason to believe the witnesses actually wanted the man to kill Genovese. Most people, in fact, would be horrified to see someone stabbed to death. And on the basis of our knowledge of human nature, we can be pretty sure the witnesses would have wanted others to get involved if they were victims.
  • Transcript of "Inferencing Lesson"

    1. 1. Parts of Speech Quiz Inferencing – 2.1.a OBJECTIVE: SWBAT demonstrate knowledge of parts of speech on a matching and composition quiz. DOL: Given a 30 question parts of speech quiz, the students will answer a minimum of 80% of questions correctly. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    2. 2. Inference: • A judgment based on reasoning rather than on direct or explicit statement, • A conclusion based on facts or circumstances, • Understandings gained by “reading between the lines.” OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    3. 3. INFERENCE FORMAT: The evidence of _____________________________________ suggests ____________________________________. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT demonstrate knowledge of parts of speech on a matching and composition quiz. DOL: Given a 30 question parts of speech quiz, the students will answer a minimum of 80% of questions correctly. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    4. 4. What can you infer based on this photo? The evidence __________________, suggests that __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    5. 5. What can you tell based on this photo? The evidence ____________ ______, suggests that ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    6. 6. What can you tell based on this photo? The evidence _____________ _____, suggests that _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _____________ _______. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    7. 7. What can you tell based on this photo? The evidence ______________ ____, suggests that ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________ ______________ __. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    8. 8. What can you tell based on this photo? The evidence ___________ _______, suggests that ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ______. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    9. 9. What can you tell based on this photo? The evidence ___________ _______, suggests that ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ______.OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    10. 10. What can you tell based on this photo? The evidence ___________ _______, suggests that ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ______.OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    11. 11. What can you tell based on this photo? The evidence ____________ ______, suggests that ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________ ____________. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    12. 12. What can you tell based on this photo? The evidence __________________, suggests that ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    13. 13. What are we supposed to assume in this clip? • And how is this inference then turned around on us? • Based on _____ • I assume _______ http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=ESicykvHUyk OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    14. 14. When you make inferences about a text you should: • Never lose sight of the available information (base your inferences on the facts) • Use your background knowledge, experience, and common sense to help you, & • Consider the alternatives (don’t simply accept the first inference that some to mind). OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    15. 15. There are two strong influences on the content of dreams. One influence is the time of your dream. When you are closest to waking, your dreams are apt to be about more recent events. In the middle of the night, however, your dreams are more likely to involve childhood or past events. The other influence on the content of dreams is presleep conditions. In one study, subjects who had six hours of active exercise before sleep tended to have dream with little physical activity. The researcher concluded that dream content may offset waking experiences to some extent. Other research supports that conclusion. For instance, subjects who had experienced a day of social isolation had dreams with a great amount of social interaction. Also, subjects who had been water-deprived dreamed of drinking. Which of the following inferences is most soundly supported by the evidence in the passage? a) Some people rarely dream. b) People don’t dream during daytime naps. c) A student studying for finals will probably dream about studying. d) People who go to bed hungry probably ten to dream of eating. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    16. 16. Explanations a) The statement in answer a is not supported at all. The passage discusses when and what people dream not how often. b) Statement b is also unsupported. Just because the passage doesn’t discuss daytime sleeping doesn’t mean we don’t dream then. Your personal experience, in fact, may tell you that people do dream in the daytime. c) According to the passage, dreams don’t mirror presleep conditions – they contrast with them. Therefore, a student studying for finals would be less likely to dream about studying. d) Answer d is most soundly supported by the passage. Because dreams “off-set waking experience,” a hungry person would dream of eating. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    17. 17. (1) A twenty-eight-year-old woman named Catherine Genovese was returning home from work one day. (2) Kitty, as she was called by almost everyone in her Queens neighborhood, had just parked her car. (3) Then a man with a knife grabbed her. (4) She screamed, “Oh my God, he stabbed me!” (5) Please help me! (6) Please help me! (7) For more than half an hour, thirty-eight neighbors watched the killer stalk Kitty. (8) The last time he stabbed her, she was slumped on the foot of the stairs to her apartment. (9) Not one person telephoned the police during the fatal attack. (10) Later, the police gathered statements from the witnesses. (11) Among their comments were “I didn’t want to get involved,” “We thought it was a lovers’ quarrel,” and “I was tired. (12) I went back to bed.” 1. We can infer that Kitty was attacked a) while she was on vacation. b) in her own neighborhood. c) on her way from work to her car. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    18. 18. (1) A twenty-eight-year-old woman named Catherine Genovese was returning home from work one day. (2) Kitty, as she was called by almost everyone in her Queens neighborhood, had just parked her car. (3) Then a man with a knife grabbed her. (4) She screamed, “Oh my God, he stabbed me!” (5) Please help me! (6) Please help me! (7) For more than half an hour, thirty-eight neighbors watched the killer stalk Kitty. (8) The last time he stabbed her, she was slumped on the foot of the stairs to her apartment. (9) Not one person telephoned the police during the fatal attack. (10) Later, the police gathered statements from the witnesses. (11) Among their comments were “I didn’t want to get involved,” “We thought it was a lovers’ quarrel,” and “I was tired. (12) I went back to bed.” 2. We can conclude that the man who stabbed Genovese a) was someone she knew. b) intended to kill her. c) was a convicted criminal. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    19. 19. (1) A twenty-eight-year-old woman named Catherine Genovese was returning home from work one day. (2) Kitty, as she was called by almost everyone in her Queens neighborhood, had just parked her car. (3) Then a man with a knife grabbed her. (4) She screamed, “Oh my God, he stabbed me!” (5) Please help me! (6) Please help me! (7) For more than half an hour, thirty-eight neighbors watched the killer stalk Kitty. (8) The last time he stabbed her, she was slumped on the foot of the stairs to her apartment. (9) Not one person telephoned the police during the fatal attack. (10) Later, the police gathered statements from the witnesses. (11) Among their comments were “I didn’t want to get involved,” “We thought it was a lovers’ quarrel,” and “I was tired. (12) I went back to bed.” 3. We can infer that the witnesses a) might have stopped the attack if they had called the police. b) wanted the man to kill Genovese. c) would not want someone else to get involved if they themselves were being attacked. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    20. 20. “The Hawk and the Buzzard” (African American Folk Tale) You know de hawk and de buzzard was settin' up in a pine tree one day' so de hawk says: "How you get yolivin', Brer Buzzard? "Ah'mmakin' out pretty good, Brer Hawk. Ah waitin' salvation of de Lawd." Hawk says, "Humph, Ah don't wait on de mercy of nobody. Ah takes mine." "Ah bet, Ah'll live to pick yo' bones, Brer Hawk." ' "Aw naw, you won't, Brer Buzzard. Watch me git my livin'." He seen a sparrersittin' on a dead limb of a tree and he sailed off and dived down at datsparrer. De end of de limb was stickin' out and he run his breast right up on de sharp point and hung dere. De sparrer flew on off. After while he got so weak he knowed he was gointer die. So de buzzard flew past just so-flyin' slow you know, and said, "Un hunh, Brer Hawk, Ah told you Ah was gointer live to pick yo' bones. Ah waits on de salvation o de Lawd. And dat.'s de way it is wid some of you young colts." ing this passage, with a partner, write your own multiple choice, inference question. You must include three answers, only one of which is correct. Write your correct answer ON THE BACK of your sticky note… along with your name. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    21. 21. “The Manner in Which We Eat” Just as people’s taste in food differs from one part of the globe to another, people’s table manners differ as well. Where developed nations share similar table manners, undeveloped or tribal nations differ greatly. Many of these manners developed because of cultural traditions. These traditions vary widely, though many are relaxed when dining in an informal setting. Cultures that use utensils practice manners that govern the proper way to eat with these utensils. Cultures that eat without utensils have specific manners that dictate how a diner may use hands and fingers politely. A host from Japan may consider it extremely rude to stick one’s chopsticks vertically into a bowl of rice. This symbolizes the way in which members of the Japanese culture offer incense to the dead. A host in India may consider it an insult if one eats or shares food with his or her left hand. Indian culture views the left hand as traditionally unclean. The manner in which diners conduct themselves at the table is also culturally diverse. For example, Middle Eastern cultures consider it polite to burp or belch after a filling meal. Other cultures outside the Middle East may find this habit insulting. Some cultures may find it insulting that men and women in developed countries eat at the same time and at the same table. Even the idea that children should eat with adults may be offensive to some more traditional cultures that prefer to have children eat at a separate table or after adults have finished their meals. The most widely shared table manners are those of the European style, as European nations brought these practices, and in large part forced them, onto other cultures during the time of western Colonialism. These table manners have changed over time to reflect the individual tastes and traditions of the culture. American and British table manners, even though the countries share a common cultural heritage, are distinctly different. To Americans, the British hold their forks upside down, and vice versa. Whereas most European nations traditionally eat with a knife and fork, Filipinos traditionally eat with a knife and spoon. So even within cultures that possess similar decorum, there are noted differences. It is amazing to see how customs may differ from culture to culture, and for a person who travels often, dining politely from culture to culture can be often nerve-wracking. 2. From this passage, a person can conclude that a) cultural etiquette is as diverse as cultural traditions. b) some cultures are just more primitive than others. c) developed nations civilized underdeveloped ones. d) eating with one's hands is messy and simply rude. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    22. 22. We all have prior experiences to connect our reading to • http://youtu.be/ho6DCYggFKo OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
    23. 23. Open your books to “102 Minutes: The Untold Story of the Fight to Survive Inside the Twin Towers” As we read, we will be working on making inferences. OBJECTIVE: SWBAT draw inferences from literary text and support those inferences with evidence from the text. (2.1.a) DOL: Given a passage, SW draw inferences from text and answer questions with 80% accuracy.
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