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Based on the work of Stepha

Based on the work of Stepha

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  • In this chapter, teachers will be exposed to the variety of skills and strategies students struggle with when they are unable to understand what they read. Also included is an “if/then” list that provides information on what teachers can do to address specific learning gaps. The purpose of this activity in the workshop is to begin to expose participants to all the skills and strategies students need in order to become proficient readers. Throughout the workshop, participants will begin to build learning targets based on CCLS and data. This introductory activity is to begin to see possible student problems when reading so they are better prepared to look at CCLS and data.
  • Annotating" means underlining or highlighting key words and phrases—anything that strikes you as surprising or significant, or that raises questions—as well as making notes in the margins. When we respond to a text in this way, we not only force ourselves to pay close attention, but we also begin to think with the author about the evidence—the first step in moving from reader to writer.