Written by Casey and EvansPresented by Ronald Yaroserai
1.   Introduction2.   Research design3.  Article focus4. Data collections5. Purpose of study6. Designing learning experien...
   The connection between young people, social networks, and education.   The relationships amongst peers affect their m...
   This action research investigates the use of online    social media as learning environment for adolescents    between...
   Teacher planning documents,   teacher’s field notes,   teacher reflections,   student work, and   summary notes.  ...
   This analysis was based on identifying what was    useful for educators or not, rather than on what was    “right” or ...
   What scaffolding is needed to help students cope    with the complexities of such an environment?   The process of ob...
   The Ning offered students a great range of    opportunities to form their own groups and    discussion forums and beco...
   First premise: students learn what they do, and    what they are learning is what you see them    doing.   Response: ...
   Third premise: taking the time and providing the resources    needed to design effective learning activities means    ...
   Students often preferred “lurking” rather than    actively participating.   Others openly used the environment to    ...
   The principle of self-renewal and self-    organization are essential foundations of chaos    theory, adhering to the ...
   Students can be free express themselves through    online interaction even they are anonymous.   Connectivism develop...
   There are a number of interactions/ replies different    student gained   Some appreciation     for   students      w...
   Enabling students to work online allowed    them to access the classroom anytime they    wished.   The researcher bel...
   What is the essence of online social networks    for students?   How teachers can handle the chaos and    complexity ...
   Connections to fractal patterns and chaos theory are very real in    the online classroom, where interaction can be us...
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Designing for learning presented by ronald yaroserai

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  • Ronald i enjoyed your presentation as it linked closely with study i have previously done on students and communication. The idea of the online and social classroom shows that ICT in the 21st century has broken down barriers of time and space which benefits students ability to learn and be engaged in the learning through taking control.
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  • It is an intriguing area of study to investigate the links between social networking and education. With the explosion of avenues and trends that have formed as a result of tools such as Facebook and twitter, it is realistic to suggest that the answer as to 'where ICT fits in education' has something to do with this element. I enjoyed your point early in the presentation when you expressed that there is no 'right or wrong' when it comes to the implementation of such technology, but it is rather based on 'what works' and 'for whom.'
    There were clear links between the suggestion of moving away from the 'instructional order of the traditional classroom' and Sukma's discussion on linear and non-linear learning. I also related with the term 'informal learning' which was covered in the article, as it recognises the 'unknown' capacity of skills and experiences that students can take from a social network context. Whether this is a positive or negative is yet to be determined. But there is an inherent discomfort in all educators at the thought of the unpredictable and uncontrollable outcomes that may arise.
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  • An interesting presentation. One important point in this article is how online social network promotes interaction to facilitate learning. I agree with the statement that interaction can be used as a vehicle for learning, and students play an important role as active learners how they construct their knowledge through this interaction. It is through interaction and participation that emotion can be shared, and ideas can be explored. This relates to Hur and Brush's (2009) idea about the relationship of reasons to participate in network community.
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  • The benefits of online social networks have been clearly established in this reading. However, I believe there has to to be more extensive qualitative research regarding online social networks in order for policies and procedures to be put into place - globally. This has to be a global policy and procedre, not just individaul schools, districts or states. I support connecting education with technology, there must be some kind of benchmark, protocol, something that acts as a guide to its use within the school. Remembering that education through technology is taking on a different identity, a different definition so there is still a lot to consider. I wiould be happy to devote future time considering the implications of this!!
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  • There is a real need to bring school environments and learning experiences closer what to what students encounter in their home lives. This means social networking is a tool we need to develop further in schools in safe and meaningful ways to broaden learning and global connections. I think we are seeing some schools now trying to connect with their community through Twitter, blogs and facebook to do exactly that.
    It is a risky (chaotic) because it is uncontrolled in many aspects and also because schools (or even DECD) haven't developed policies yet to guide the ways social media might be used successfully in schools.
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Designing for learning presented by ronald yaroserai

  1. 1. Written by Casey and EvansPresented by Ronald Yaroserai
  2. 2. 1. Introduction2. Research design3. Article focus4. Data collections5. Purpose of study6. Designing learning experiences7. Criteria of effective teaching8. Emergence: social media as a classroom environment9. Chaos in teaching environment10. Analysis: formal and informal learning11. Discussion12. Conclusion Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai
  3. 3.  The connection between young people, social networks, and education. The relationships amongst peers affect their motivations, interests, attention, and involvement. By incorporating social media into the lives of students in the classroom, teachers also incorporate the new literacies that are becoming part of student’s out-of-school lives (Alvarez, 2001; Fletcher, 2007; Glover & Oliver, 2008; Hahn, 2008). However, how these new ICTs should be used in the classroom is still a topic of debate. The theories of connections, emergence, chaos, complexity, and fractals. Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai
  4. 4.  This action research investigates the use of online social media as learning environment for adolescents between 13 and 16 years old throughout semester 2, 2010. The school is located in Gelong, victoria in Australia. Online tools and environments were used in a all of the researchs classes to deliver the classroom curriculum. One main Ning social network was used as a base camp to communicate, publish, and link to the other online environments. Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai
  5. 5.  Teacher planning documents, teacher’s field notes, teacher reflections, student work, and summary notes. Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai
  6. 6.  This analysis was based on identifying what was useful for educators or not, rather than on what was “right” or “wrong” (Szempli and Stupnicka 2003, p.1) The terms chaos or chaotic, meaning that the changes in time are without pattern or control and hence are unpredictable and uncontrollable. Chaos and complexity are perspectives in new science and postmodern inquiry that may implicate significant changes in how we understand and approach curriculum (Fleener, 2005). Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai
  7. 7.  What scaffolding is needed to help students cope with the complexities of such an environment? The process of observing, identifying issues, raising questions, developing ideas, monitoring, evaluating, and changing what and how things were done constant and became part of teaching life. The framework supported the flexibility that was needed in the curriculum delivery and allowed the researcher to think through other models of delivery, which assisted in helping her move away from the “instructional order” of the traditional classroom. Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai
  8. 8.  The Ning offered students a great range of opportunities to form their own groups and discussion forums and become involved in those made by others. The Ning provided students with a “life-like” curriculum (Beane 2006, p.10) Moving away from the “instructional order” of the traditional classroom as the semester progressed. Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai
  9. 9.  First premise: students learn what they do, and what they are learning is what you see them doing. Response: after two weeks, student became competent in the collaborative methods of studying on using Ning online. Second premise: social relationships determine learning. Response: a range of informal learning could be found. Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai
  10. 10.  Third premise: taking the time and providing the resources needed to design effective learning activities means covering much less of the formal curriculum. Response: extra time was not available for activities due to school timetable constrains. Fourth premise: effective activities are managed by the students themselves. Response: projects the teacher gave to students involved teaching their peers or younger students. It focuses on problem solving, brings student some knowledge, understanding of the content and procedures. Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai
  11. 11.  Students often preferred “lurking” rather than actively participating. Others openly used the environment to promote their own ideas and interests, increase their popularity, or present themselves as knowledgeable. Some students used to express their frustration and feelings Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai
  12. 12.  The principle of self-renewal and self- organization are essential foundations of chaos theory, adhering to the idea of order through fluctuation (Murphy1995, p. 28) . Reflecting on the disorder that occurred, the teachers could see the possibilities of using disorder as a teachable moment. Understanding the implications of disorder in relation of curriculum and learning allowed a teacher to reassess what was needed before taking control of future issues / activities. Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai
  13. 13.  Students can be free express themselves through online interaction even they are anonymous. Connectivism develop knowledge through formal and informal interactions. Teachers approach student’s question randomly on school context. Online discussions and interactions were an important feature in providing students with constructive feedback for improvement prior to peer and self-assessment. Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai
  14. 14.  There are a number of interactions/ replies different student gained Some appreciation for students who shared information. A range of individual peer assessments with feedback. A certain patterns of behavior seem to be fixed, with some that are periodic and others that are chaotic occurring in a class among teachers, students, subject material, and the classroom environment (Smitherman2005, p. 158). Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai
  15. 15.  Enabling students to work online allowed them to access the classroom anytime they wished. The researcher believes that making good use of new technologies increases demands on teachers, as argued by Bertram (2002, p. 17) Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai
  16. 16.  What is the essence of online social networks for students? How teachers can handle the chaos and complexity of online social network in the classroom? How the online social networks can be developed in education system? Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai
  17. 17.  Connections to fractal patterns and chaos theory are very real in the online classroom, where interaction can be used as a vehicle for learning, and students’ awareness of their own communications encourages them to be active participants in the learning process. Smitherman (2005, p. 168) argues that learning occurs in nonlinear patterns: emergent, divergent, and convergent. It was clear that in this study that participants were able to take control of many aspects of learning, including supporting and assessing their peers. Teacher cannot take this approach in fear of chaos and disorder; they must find innovative ways to construct disorder and flow with chaos and builds resilience to the traditional training that instinctively drives them to take control. Casey and Evans article presented by Ronald Yaroserai

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