Architecture in the Information Age3: “Loosing the Ballast of Materiality”                                      Dr Martyn ...
Introductory Lecture             Lecture 1 Origins             Lecture 2 OriginsLecture 3 Loosing the Ballast of Materiali...
Blog
9                                        88                    7                           77    6                        ...
9                                        88                    7                           77    6                        ...
9                                        88                    7                           77    6                        ...
9                                        88                    7                           77    6                        ...
Last Week:204 Unique Visitors499 Visits2,907 Page Views30 Countries
Last Week:            This Week:204 Unique Visitors   353499 Visits            7992,907 Page Views      3,76830 Countries ...
96 Views                        94 Views                 Most Visited Philip Morris                   John Beattie
Carolina FigueroaPost of the Week   (63 visits)
Recap
Linguistic SystemArchitectonic System
Architectonic System
Architectonic System                      FormSpace           Function
Architectonic SystemSpace
Space
Morphological: ?Space        Visual: ?        Perceptual: ?        Social: ?        Functional: ?        Temporal: ?      ...
Blog
…World One, he (Popper) identified with the objective world of material, natural things  and their physical properties-wit...
World Two he identified with the subjective world of consciousness – withintentions, calculations, feelings, thoughts,    ...
World Three, he said, is the world of objects, real public structures which arenot-necessarily-intentional products of the...
…temples, cathedrals, marketplaces, courts, li              braries, theatres or  amphitheatres, letters, book pages, movi...
+
+   =
The road to Cyberspace…
The road to Cyberspace…
500 BCSimonides
500 BCSimonides   Scopas
500 BCSimonides   Scopas
500 BC            Castor and PolluxSimonides              Scopas
500 BC            Castor and PolluxSimonides              Scopas
500 BC            Castor and PolluxSimonides              Scopas
500 BC            Castor and PolluxSimonides              Scopas
500 BCSimonides   Scopas
500 BC            Yates, F. A., The Art            of Memory (London:            Pimlico, 2001)Simonides
80 BC        Cicero M. T., Cicero        on the Orator        (London:        LOEB, 1948)
Sorabji, J., Aristotle  Aristotles application of the word topos to    on Memory (London:                                 ...
The Method of Loci
The Method of Loci                     Modularity                     Discipline:                     Neuroscience
1500 AD          Giulio Camillo
1500 AD The Theatre of Memory
He pretends that all things that the human                                                 Yates, F. A., The Art mind can ...
The art of memory was, through the      development of the 16th century Lullist                                           ...
Ars Combinatoria
Ars Combinatoria
Ars CombinatoriaLogic
Ars CombinatoriaLogic              Architecture
1800s  It is usually found that one and the same truth  may be put in different places according to the    terms it contai...
1900s http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72nfrhXroo8 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hSyfZkVgasI                               ...
1950s
1950s
When data of any sort are placed in     storage, they are filed alphabetically or       Wardrip-Fruin, N. and             ...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c539cK58ees
1960shttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fNXLK78ZaFo                                             Douglas Engelbart
1990s  [Information organised] as a network in which         nodes are text chunks (e.g. lists of      items, paragraphs, ...
The Web‟s type of “chunk style” hypertext – static links that allow the user to jump from page to page-has been around for...
Homework
Reading:           Read and post about           Architecture and           Cyberspace.
Lecture3 the ballast of materiality
Lecture3 the ballast of materiality
Lecture3 the ballast of materiality
Lecture3 the ballast of materiality
Lecture3 the ballast of materiality
Lecture3 the ballast of materiality
Lecture3 the ballast of materiality
Lecture3 the ballast of materiality
Lecture3 the ballast of materiality
Lecture3 the ballast of materiality
Lecture3 the ballast of materiality
Lecture3 the ballast of materiality
Lecture3 the ballast of materiality
Lecture3 the ballast of materiality
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Lecture3 the ballast of materiality

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Lecture given as part of Newcastle University's module Architecture in the Information Age.

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Lecture3 the ballast of materiality

  1. 1. Architecture in the Information Age3: “Loosing the Ballast of Materiality” Dr Martyn Dade-Robertson
  2. 2. Introductory Lecture Lecture 1 Origins Lecture 2 OriginsLecture 3 Loosing the Ballast of Materiality Lecture 4 Cyberspace Lecture 5 Augmented Space Lecture 6 Sentient Space Lecture 7 Programming Architecture
  3. 3. Blog
  4. 4. 9 88 7 77 6 6 66 5 5 55 4 4 4 4 4 44 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 33 2 2 22 1 1 1 1 1 11 0 0 0 0 0 00 Number of Posts Number of Comments
  5. 5. 9 88 7 77 6 6 66 5 5 55 4 4 4 4 4 44 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 33 2 2 22 1 1 1 1 1 11 0 0 0 0 0 00 Number of Posts Number of Comments
  6. 6. 9 88 7 77 6 6 66 5 5 55 4 4 4 4 4 44 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 33 2 2 22 1 1 1 1 1 11 0 0 0 0 0 00 Number of Posts Number of Comments
  7. 7. 9 88 7 77 6 6 66 5 5 55 4 4 4 4 4 44 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 33 2 2 22 1 1 1 1 1 11 0 0 0 0 0 00 Number of Posts Number of Comments
  8. 8. Last Week:204 Unique Visitors499 Visits2,907 Page Views30 Countries
  9. 9. Last Week: This Week:204 Unique Visitors 353499 Visits 7992,907 Page Views 3,76830 Countries 46
  10. 10. 96 Views 94 Views Most Visited Philip Morris John Beattie
  11. 11. Carolina FigueroaPost of the Week (63 visits)
  12. 12. Recap
  13. 13. Linguistic SystemArchitectonic System
  14. 14. Architectonic System
  15. 15. Architectonic System FormSpace Function
  16. 16. Architectonic SystemSpace
  17. 17. Space
  18. 18. Morphological: ?Space Visual: ? Perceptual: ? Social: ? Functional: ? Temporal: ? Homework
  19. 19. Blog
  20. 20. …World One, he (Popper) identified with the objective world of material, natural things and their physical properties-with their energy, and weight and motion and rest; Benedikt, M. Cyberspace First Steps (MIT 1992)
  21. 21. World Two he identified with the subjective world of consciousness – withintentions, calculations, feelings, thoughts, dreams, memories, and so on, in individual minds. Benedikt, M. Cyberspace First Steps (MIT 1992)
  22. 22. World Three, he said, is the world of objects, real public structures which arenot-necessarily-intentional products of the minds of living creatures interacting with each other and with World 1.[Benedikt 1991: 4] Benedikt, M. Cyberspace First Steps (MIT 1992)
  23. 23. …temples, cathedrals, marketplaces, courts, li braries, theatres or amphitheatres, letters, book pages, movie reels, video tapes, CDs, newspapers, hard Benedikt, M. Cyberspace First disks, performance, art shows…are all Steps (MIT 1992)physical manifestations-or should one say, the physical components of objects which exist more wholly in World Three…patterns of information. [Benedikt 1991: 4]
  24. 24. +
  25. 25. + =
  26. 26. The road to Cyberspace…
  27. 27. The road to Cyberspace…
  28. 28. 500 BCSimonides
  29. 29. 500 BCSimonides Scopas
  30. 30. 500 BCSimonides Scopas
  31. 31. 500 BC Castor and PolluxSimonides Scopas
  32. 32. 500 BC Castor and PolluxSimonides Scopas
  33. 33. 500 BC Castor and PolluxSimonides Scopas
  34. 34. 500 BC Castor and PolluxSimonides Scopas
  35. 35. 500 BCSimonides Scopas
  36. 36. 500 BC Yates, F. A., The Art of Memory (London: Pimlico, 2001)Simonides
  37. 37. 80 BC Cicero M. T., Cicero on the Orator (London: LOEB, 1948)
  38. 38. Sorabji, J., Aristotle Aristotles application of the word topos to on Memory (London: Gerald Duckworth & general patterns of argument is the source of Company, 1972)the name of this treatise, The Topics. And this use of the word, along with the related use in rhetoric, is the source of the English expression topic and commonplace. If the above suggestions are correct, these wordswill have come via Aristotle ultimately from the system of place memory. Aristotle, Topics [Sorabji 1972: 32] (NuVision, 2005)
  39. 39. The Method of Loci
  40. 40. The Method of Loci Modularity Discipline: Neuroscience
  41. 41. 1500 AD Giulio Camillo
  42. 42. 1500 AD The Theatre of Memory
  43. 43. He pretends that all things that the human Yates, F. A., The Art mind can conceive and which we cannot see of Memory (London: Pimlico, 2001) with the corporeal eye, after being collected together by diligent meditation, may beexpressed by certain corporeal signs in such a way that the beholder may at once perceive with his eyes everything which is otherwise hidden in the depths of the human mind. [Yates quoting Salvarolo 2001: 137]
  44. 44. The art of memory was, through the development of the 16th century Lullist Rossi, P., Logic and tradition, also a „memorative logic‟, based on the Art of Memory (London: the belief that the placing of things had an Athlone, 2000) inexorable association to the logical ordering of knowledge, „in the perfect correspondence between words …. and things…, between logic and ontology’ [Rossi 2000: 61]. Though the art of memory has been lost, relegated to the status of „an intellectual fossil‟ [Rossi 2000: xxi], thedrive towards a universal language with which to represent knowledge has persisted, first through Aristotle and later through Leibniz.
  45. 45. Ars Combinatoria
  46. 46. Ars Combinatoria
  47. 47. Ars CombinatoriaLogic
  48. 48. Ars CombinatoriaLogic Architecture
  49. 49. 1800s It is usually found that one and the same truth may be put in different places according to the terms it contains, and also according to the mediate terms or causes upon which it Leibniz, G. W. New Essays Concerning depends and according to the inferences and Human Understanding (New results it may have. A simple categoric York: proposition has only two terms; but a Macmillan, 1896) hypothetic proposition may have four, not to speak of complex statements. [Leibniz 1896: 623]
  50. 50. 1900s http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72nfrhXroo8 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hSyfZkVgasI Paul Otlet
  51. 51. 1950s
  52. 52. 1950s
  53. 53. When data of any sort are placed in storage, they are filed alphabetically or Wardrip-Fruin, N. and N. Montfort (eds), The numerically and information is found (when it New Media Reader (Cambridge Mass: is) by tracing it down from subclass to MIT Press, 2003) subclass, it can only appear in oneplace…The human mind does not work in thatway. It operates by association. With one item in its grasp, it snaps instantly to the next thatis suggested by the association of thoughts, in accordance with some intricate web of trails carried by the cells of the brain. [Bush 1945: 105]
  54. 54. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c539cK58ees
  55. 55. 1960shttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fNXLK78ZaFo Douglas Engelbart
  56. 56. 1990s [Information organised] as a network in which nodes are text chunks (e.g. lists of items, paragraphs, pages) and links are relationships between nodes (e.g semantic Berners- Lee, T., Weaving associations, expansions, definitions, example the Web: The Past, Present and Future of the World s…). Wide Web by its Inventor (New York: Texere, 2000) [Rouet et al 1996: 3]
  57. 57. The Web‟s type of “chunk style” hypertext – static links that allow the user to jump from page to page-has been around for decades and has been criticised for just as long. For Nelson, chunk style hypertext is just onesubtype of hypertext, a term he introduced to mean “a body of written or pictorial materialinterconnected in such a complex way that it could not conveniently be presented or represented on paper.” The “hyper” inNelson‟s neologism does not mean “link” butrather connotes extension and generality: cf. “hyperspace”. [Wardrip-Fruin and Monfort. 2003: 301]
  58. 58. Homework
  59. 59. Reading: Read and post about Architecture and Cyberspace.
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