SM 180A CME Report Summary
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  • 1. Report Summary: Educating the Market: Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical EducationEducating the Market: CreatingValue ThroughSupport of Benchmarking Report at-a-Glance Featured Study ParticipantsContinuing Education North American and European Segment • Alcon • Amylin • AstraZenecaPROJECT BACKGROUND • Baxter • Boehinger Ingelheim • Bristol-Myers SquibbIn today’s age of public concern over the state of the healthcare • Celgenesystem, physicians are faced with escalating pressure to • Daiichi-Sankyodemonstrate competence and achieve adequate patient outcomes. • Eli Lilly & Co. • GenentechOne method for improving performance in these areas is • HemoCuephysician participation in ongoing professional development and • Janssen-CilagContinuing Medical Education (CME) activities. • Merck • Merck Serono • NovartisCME requirements vary significantly between states, regions and • Novo Nordiskcountries, and, for a multitude of sources providing CME, the • Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics • Pfizersole criterion for obtaining official credit is attendance. Of • Roche Labscourse, physical attendance alone does not necessarily translate • Sanofi-Aventisinto retention of information, much less the implementation of • Sepracor • Talecriseffective new practices. The current arrangement thus begs the • TAPquestion of whether the accumulation of CME credits has much • Tevaimpact on competence or performance, and, if not, are current • VianexCME programs capable of serving their purpose of improving • Wyethphysician performance and patient care. With limited Third-Party Provider Segmentinformation on actual return on expenditures in support of CME • AMKactivities, and to ensure that investments provide the desirable • AXDEV • Indegeneimpact on healthcare practitioner behaviors and patient • Indicia Medical Educations, LLCoutcomes, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies are • Invivo Communicationsanxious to understand the value of CME support and adopt the • Medimix International • WentzMiller & Associates, LLCbest strategies to fulfill its potential.Best Practices, LLC © (919) 403-0251 1
  • 2. Report Summary: Educating the Market: Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical Education This benchmarking study was conducted to identify the most Industry Analysis important current trends and future directions of CME in the This research was based on benchmark North American and European marketplace. The research survey data and executive interviews of 30 participants from 26 pharmaceutical, examined a number of areas, including what structural forms biotechnology and medical education are used to deploy CME, optimize budgets and best deliver companies. content. In addition, the study looked at the current global landscape of CME, as well as the rapidly evolving role of E- Information Types CME. Managers and executives can use the key benchmark • 13 Information Graphics metrics, executive insights and recommendations of this report • 25 Data Graphics • 315 Metrics to map a path to future success in support of CME. • 23 Executive & Manager Narratives Report LengthSTUDY METHODOLOGY • 65 pages Research for Educating the Market: Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical Education was based on benchmark survey data and executive interviews of 30 participants from 26 pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical education companies. This Best Practices, LLC report provides a comprehensive look at how pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies deploy CME to ensure that their investment yields the desired impact on physician behavior and, therefore, patient outcome. The report, which also incorporates third-party input from seven CME vendors and eight medical associations or teaching hospitals, offers benchmarks, insights and best practices in key areas such as: • Geographic delivery of CME • Structural management of CME • CME investment budgets for North America and Europe • Planned versus spontaneous CME investment • Functional responsibility for CME • CME delivery in North America (company directed versus 3rd party, etc.) • CME delivery in Europe • Background & experience of CME employees • Tenure of CME employees • CME delivery modes for North America and Europe • Use of E-CME in North America and Europe • Effectiveness ratings for CME delivery activities in North America and EuropeSAMPLE FINDINGS Among the findings that emerged from this research are the following:Best Practices, LLC © (919) 403-0251 2
  • 3. Report Summary: Educating the Market: Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical Education • Decentralized Structures Reflect Balkanized CME Landscape: Decentralized Management Structures proliferate across the CME landscape where language differences, learning style differences, and local market variation create hurdles for centralized management structures. • The Internet is Quickly Growing in Relevance as a Delivery Mechanism: E- CME is on the rise, fostered especially by the fractured CME marketplace in Europe. Generational differences present short-term obstacles to E-CME growth. However, the Balkanized state of CME support accelerates use to educate smaller markets. • Face-to-Face CME Delivery is Most Common, Despite Some Face-to-Face Formats Most Often Being Rated Least Effective: CME program heads must manage a “resource, targeting and quality paradox”: the most highly used CME delivery forms are often the least efficient and were lowest-rated for information retention. Smart CME leaders target to reach physicians at the right time with the right CME programs. • Basic Management Tools Provide Disproportionately Positive CME Impact: CME is still in its early stages throughout North America and Europe. Consequently, basic management tools – such as strategic planning, performance measurement, program reviews, continuous improvement cycles and management by objective – are emerging as part of the CME toolkit that have a disproportionately positive impact.RESEARCH BENEFITS 1. Access scarce benchmark data that doesn’t exist elsewhere, including processes for developing CME employees. 2. See examples of how the CME landscape varies over different markets, regions and countries. 3. Learn what criticisms currently exist regarding the framework and financing of CME, and how organizations are working to make improvements for the benefit of the CME function. 4. Understand the pros and cons of various structural trends proliferating across different markets. 5. Discover how leading companies utilize budgetary resources to align key priorities with target physician groups. 6. Discover effective use of councils and community practice to accelerate learning across countries, therapeutic areas and brands. 7. Find out how companies are evolving their methods to target ready to change physicians. 8. See how leading companies utilize an integrated mix of targeting, programming, multiple delivery channels and frequency to achieve positive CME outcomes.Best Practices, LLC © (919) 403-0251 3
  • 4. Report Summary: Educating the Market: Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical Education 9. Learn how top companies incorporate the rapidly evolving delivery channel of E-CME to maximize reach and user preference. 10. See individual program leader responses on their top lessons learned, best practices and functional management in regards to CME.SAMPLE BEST PRACTICE AND DATA SECTION Cultivate E-Learning to enhance reach, convenience, cost efficiency and performance tracking abilities. The Internet is quickly growing in relevance as a delivery mechanism. As already mentioned, E- CME is flourishing: today it is responsible on average for delivering between 10 and 25 percent of global CME content; CME leaders estimate that this percentage will double over the next three to five years. Already, adopters are delivering as much as 75 percent of CME content through the Internet in the U.S. and 50 percent in Europe. Figure 7.9: The Internet is Growing in Relevance as a Delivery Mechanism One factor driving higher E-CME usage is that younger physicians entering the industry are more open to receiving E-CME, whereas older physicians are more resistant to the format. AsBest Practices, LLC © (919) 403-0251 4
  • 5. Report Summary: Educating the Market: Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical Education earlier generations of physicians retire, the younger, more Internet-savvy physicians who replace them figure to bolster future demand for CME to be presented via this delivery mode. Web-based delivery also offers a platform that accommodates multiple learner preferences. One interviewed Director stated: “Through the Internet…you can have online delivery, you can have available downloadable PDF, you can have available a live lecture, “I don’t want to imply you can have available case vignettes, you can have available that the Internet is the interactive activities; you can hit so much through that vehicle.” He answer to everything, but if you’re looking for continued: “I don’t want to imply that the Internet is the answer to effective ways to do everything, but if you’re looking for effective ways to do something something in a cost- in a cost-efficient manner that you can easily garner appropriate efficient manner…the Internet is the way to metrics, the Internet is the way to go.” go.” -Interviewed Director In addition to its appeal these different learner preferences, the Internet provides short cuts for targeting physicians who are broadly distributed across the spectrum of readiness-for-behavioral-change as a result of CME. Stated one interviewed participant: “What you’re doing is trying to look at where these people are in their behavior change, and then develop sequential learning models because there’s one thing about trying to target the pre-contemplative guy versus the guy who’s ready to take action. There’s also data that shows physicians will self-select where they are. So, if they’re given a menu, they will self-select where they think they are, as opposed to you trying to research all the data and figure out where they are.” Moreover, continued the participant: “You give a whole series of programs and they can self- select; ‘I’m pre-contemplative and I think I’m doing everything right, what are these people “The Internet provides trying to tell me? I’ve got to go over here and look and see a very flexible format where I’m falling short,’ and they’ll self-select that. At the same for mass time, they may self-select, ‘I like listening to lectures, so I’m customization in terms of self-selection for going to click on that and listen to the lecture and watch the learner preferences as slide.’ Another guy may say, ‘I’m pre-contemplative, I don’t well as readiness to change.” understand why they’re telling me I’m not practicing correctly, let me go see. And, I love print, so I’m going to print out this -Interviewed Benchmark Participant monograph.’” In summary, the Internet provides a very flexible format for mass customization in terms of self-selection for learner preferences as well as readiness to change. The dividends E-CME could bring to the European market are immense. E-CME guarantees a consistent platform from which accredited material can be conveyed on a global scale to physicians – a critical step in bridging gaps in cross-border communications, resources and markets. However, E-CME usage in Europe lags behind that of the United States, where average United States usage is twice as high.Best Practices, LLC © (919) 403-0251 5
  • 6. Report Summary: Educating the Market: Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical Education Figure 7.10: E-CME Delivery in Europe & North America Also worth noting, as it is a probable cause for the slower uptake of E-CME in Europe, is that even fewer countries accredit long-distance learning than require CME. Interestingly, European uptake of E-CME may be faster in remote areas, where access to live CME is less frequent, than in large population centers. This fact points to a possible solution for reaching markets that provider presently neglect in their effort to manage limited resources while adhering to existing regulations, and illustrates how E-CME will likely play a role in creating an optimal channel mix for distribution of CME in the European market.Best Practices, LLC © (919) 403-0251 6
  • 7. Report Summary: Educating the Market: Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical Education Figure 7.11: Defining Optimal Channel Mix for European MarketREPORT STRUCTURE AND ORGANIZATION The project findings are organized into an executive summary, a series of four topical chapters, and an appendix. Following is a description of each section: • Executive summary: Explains the survey methodology, identifies participating companies and reports key findings. • Topical chapters: These chapters provide, by subject, a depiction of survey responses, discussion of key trends identified from an analysis of the data and write-ups of best practices harvested from in-depth interviews. o Current Landscape of CME – Includes sections on the North American CME Landscape, the European CME Landscape and Criticisms of the CME Framework. o Current CME Structural Trends – Discusses Decentralized, Centralize and Hub-and-Spokes Structural Models, Leveraging Budgetary Resources, Planned Versus Spontaneous CME Programming and the Use of Councils and Communities of Practice. o CME Evolution Models – Investigates the Behavioral Change Models being applied to CME, Tactics to Align CME Deployment with Physician ChangeBest Practices, LLC © (919) 403-0251 7
  • 8. Report Summary: Educating the Market: Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical Education Readiness, Utilizing Multiple Message Frequency to Enhance the Outcomes of CME and Metrics to Determine the Effectiveness of CME. o CME Functional Management – Discussion of Where CME Oversight Lies in Both North America and Europe, the Utilization of Single Distribution Channels for CME Management, Managing CME Content to Create Consistency and to Separate the Promotional from the Educational in CME Programs, Optimizing CME Delivery Channels, Cultivating E-learning and Building Talent, Depth and Competence with Limited Resources. o Current Trends and Future Directions of CME – Emphasis on the Forces Driving the Current Trends in CME and Reported Areas for Improvement in the Future Planning and Development of CME Programs. o Best Practices and Lessons – Highlights lessons learned and advice from benchmark participants pertaining to the development and utilization of CME to achieve optimal return on investment.ABOUT BENCHMARKINGREPORTS.COM BenchmarkingReports.com is a service of Best Practices, LLC, world leader in benchmarking research and analysis. BenchmarkingReports.com provides vital insights and data from our primary research at a fraction of original project cost. Best Practices, LLC has conducted pioneering benchmarking research for top companies since 1991, providing clients with "Access and Intelligence for Achieving World-Class Excellence." To learn how we can help you find solutions to your current business issues, visit our site at www.best-in-class.com.Best Practices, LLC © (919) 403-0251 8
  • 9. Report Summary: Educating the Market: Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical EducationTABLE OF CONTENTSExecutive Summary ....................................................................................................................... 4INTRODUCTION.............................................................................................................................. 4RESEARCH APPROACH ................................................................................................................ 5PARTICIPANT DEMOGRAPHICS................................................................................................... 5DEFINITIONS AND ABBREVIATIONS............................................................................................ 8REPORT STRUCTURE AND ORGANIZATION.............................................................................. 8KEY FINDINGS................................................................................................................................ 8Current Trends and Future Direction of CME ........................................................................... 11CURRENT AND FUTURE TRENDS IN CME GRANTS FUNDING .............................................. 13VOICES FROM THE FIELD .......................................................................................................... 17The Current Landscape of CME ................................................................................................. 19THE NORTH AMERICAN CME LANDSCAPE .............................................................................. 20THE CME LANDSCAPE IN EUROPE ........................................................................................... 20CRITICISMS OF CME FRAMEWORK .......................................................................................... 20Current CME Structural Trends .................................................................................................. 23DECENTRALIZED MODEL ........................................................................................................... 24CENTRALIZED MODEL ................................................................................................................ 25HUB-AND-SPOKES MODEL ......................................................................................................... 27LEVERAGING BUDGETARY RESOURCES ................................................................................ 29CME Evolutions Models .............................................................................................................. 36CME Functional Management..................................................................................................... 42OPTIMIZING CME DELIVERY CHANNELS.................................................................................. 46BUILDING TALENT DEPTH, BREADTH AND COMPETENCE.................................................... 55MANAGING CME CONTENT ........................................................................................................ 60Best Practices, LLC © (919) 403-0251 9
  • 10. Report Summary: Educating the Market: Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical EducationTABLES AND FIGURESTable 1.1: Participating Companies, North America ..................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Table 1.2: Participating Companies, Third-party Vendors ............ Error! Bookmark not defined.Table 1.3: Project Participants, Medical Associations and Teaching HospitalsError! Bookmark not defined.Table 1.4: Benchmark Class Representatives by Title .................. Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 2.1: Voices from the Field: Why Pharma Funding is NeededError! Bookmark not defined.Figure 2.2: Opportunities Exist to Provide Grants......................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 2.3: CME Programs Get Funded Most of the Time ........... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 2.4: Access to ACE Funding Will Remain Difficult .......... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 2.5: Obtaining Grants Expected to Become Tougher......... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 2.6: Obstacles to Grants Funding Going Forward .............. Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 3.1: Epicenters Driving CME ............................................. Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 4.1: Decentralized CME Structures Proliferate .................. Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 4.2: Decentralized Model, Europe...................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 4.3: Decentralized Structure, Pros and Cons ...................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 4.4: Centralized Model, Europe.......................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 4.5: Centralized Structures, Pros and Cons ........................ Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 4.6: Hub-and-Spokes Model, Europe ................................. Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 4.7: Hub-and-Spokes Model, Pros and Cons...................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 5.1: CME Investment Levels Vary Between Markets ........ Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 5.2: Balance Planned & Spontaneous CME Programs....... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 5.3: Voices from the Field: Generating Grants Needs AssessmentsError! Bookmark not defined.Figure 5.4: Use Assessments to Set Strategic Agenda................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 5.5: Engage CME Practice Communities to Accelerate LearningError! Bookmark not defined.Figure 6.1: Change Models are Being Applied to CME................ Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 6.2: Targeting CME for Ready-Changing Physicians ........ Error! Bookmark not defined.Best Practices, LLC © (919) 403-0251 10
  • 11. Report Summary: Educating the Market: Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical EducationFigure 6.3: New Formula Emerging to Optimize CME Impact..... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 6.4: Improving CME Performance Impact ......................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.1: Medical Affairs & Communications Have CME OversightError! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.2: North American Distribution Channels are Centrally ManagedError! Bookmark not defined.3Figure 7.3: European CME Distribution Channels are Centrally ManagedError! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.4: Medical Affairs & Grants Groups Lead North American CMEError! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.5: Marketing & Medical Affairs Lead European CME ... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.6: Face-to-Face & E-CME Dominate in North America. Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.7: Face-to-Face Delivery is Dominant in Europe ............ Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.8: CME Delivery Channel Effectiveness vs. Use............ Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.9: The Internet is Growing in Relevance as a Delivery MechanismError! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.10: E-CME Delivery in Europe & North America.......... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.11: Defining Optimal Channel Mix for European MarketError! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.12: Develop a CME Strategy to Best Manage Limited ResourcesError! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.13: Few People Work in CME Groups............................ Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.14: Half of Partners Do Not Provide Training to Staff.... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.15: CME Staff Tenure and Hiring Requirements ............ Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.16: Building CME Talent Depth Key Need in Europe.... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.17: Most Effective European CME Services................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.18: Most Effective North American CME Services ........ Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.19: Field-Based Assessments Reveal the State of Clinical Practice in the LocalMarket............................................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.20: Third-Party Vendors Deliver Most European CME.. Error! Bookmark not defined.Figure 7.21: Third-Party Vendors Dominate North American CME DeliveryError! Bookmark not defined.Best Practices, LLC © (919) 403-0251 11
  • 12. Report Summary: Educating the Market: Creating Value Through Support of Continuing Medical EducationORDER FORM I’d like to order the following Best Practice Benchmarking Report.® ID PUBLICATION TITLE QUANTITY PRICE SUBTOTAL Educating the Market: Creating ValueSM-180 Through Support of Continuing Ordering Education 3 or more reports Deduct 10% Options Shipping and Handling: Add $26 ($48 international) per report ONLINE TOTAL benchmarkingreports.com PHONE SHIP TO: (919) 403-0251 Name FAX Title (919) 403-0144 Company EMAIL Street Address bestpractices@best-in- class.com City/State/Country Zip MAIL Phone Fax Best Practices, LLC 6350 Quadrangle Drive Email Suite 200 Chapel Hill, NC 27517 PAYMENT OPTIONS: Check enclosed payable to “Best Practices, LLC” Visa MasterCard American Express Card Number Exp. Date Authorized SignatureBest Practices, LLC © (919) 403-0251 12