The evolution of work life
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The evolution of work life

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the sort journey to evolution of work - life balance...do you know how various generations influence today workplace? do you know how to handle Millennial?

the sort journey to evolution of work - life balance...do you know how various generations influence today workplace? do you know how to handle Millennial?

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The evolution of work life The evolution of work life Presentation Transcript

  • THE EVOLUTION OF WORK - LIFE FOUR GENERATIONS OF WORKERS PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF GENERATIONS WORK CHARACTERISTICS Martina GEORGIEVOVÁ Senior trainer/consultant/coach DEVELOR www.develor.sk
  • Think performance The evolution of Work - Life  1900: work
  • Think performance The evolution of Work - Life  1950: work life separation
  • Think performance The evolution of Work - Life  1970: work spills into life
  • Think performance The evolution of Work - Life  1980: work life balance
  • Think performance The evolution of Work - Life  2000: life spills into work
  • Think performance The evolution of Work - Life  2010: work-life blending
  • Work evaluation through different generations
  • Drawing: Cécile Périnelle-Michelet Working Environment # 1: Cramped cubicles are separated by 1.80m high partitions; senior managers have larger individual offices behind closed doors. Virtualization???
  • Drawing: Cécile Périnelle-Michelet Old-model stand-alone computer (if any) Paper domination (files, binders, trays, books, post- it, flying sheets…) Small traditional desk Old-model telephone The employee mainly works with telephone, pen and paper. The computer is used for word processing, if at all Working time is monitored Hard white light from ceiling neon lighting Dress code is strict (uniform, full suit) Simple revolving chair, no armrest Working Environment # 1: Cramped cubicles are separated by 1.80m high partitions; senior managers have larger individual offices behind closed doors. Virtualization???
  • Think performance ENVIRONMENT DOESN'T SUPPORT TRUST  We can find more destroyers, like doors usually closed, colleagues cant see each other well, information mostly on papers, knowledge is shared just with few (strong hierarchy and strict rules – how to deal with information, how to communicate with whom).  Atmosphere more formal, respect of hierarchy expected; openly speech rather rare; nobody interesting in personal life (emotions are not welcome). There is little need to build trust (what for? Boss is always right and use mostly directive style)
  • Drawing: Cécile Périnelle-Michelet Working Environment # 2: Glass-walled offices for 1 to 4 people (those for one person also have a small comfortable sitting area).
  • Drawing: Cécile Périnelle-Michelet Reasonably recent desktop with sound, connected to LAN Paper is used but controlled Spacious L-shaped desk, adapted to computer work Modern wireless telephone with speakerphone The employee mainly works with telephone, paper, fax and computer. Offices are equipped with printers and fax machines Natural light supplemented with halogen lamps Dress code is business elegant (suit with no vest, no uniform) Working Environment # 2: Glass-walled offices for 1 to 4 people (those for one person also have a small comfortable sitting area). Comfortable revolving chair with armrest Mobile phones are sometimes used Personal touch (family photos…)
  • Think performance ENVIRONMENT STARTS SUPPORT TRUST  More open atmosphere, people can see each other through glass-walls, better technology for sharing information (many info about company on Intranet).  One can find some signs of personal touch (like family photo).  Communication still very polite and keeping distance, but no so formal anymore. (Boss look for trust in abilities /skills of his team members).
  • Drawing: Cécile Périnelle-Michelet Working Environment # 3: Open landscaped working area for all, modern ergonomic working stations (not always permanently assigned to employees)
  • Drawing: Cécile Périnelle-Michelet Recent multimedia notebook, connected to intranet Hardly any paper except mail and reference books Mobile phone with headset The employee mainly works with portable computer and telephone. Office is equipped with printer/fax/scanner/copy machine Natural light supplemented with halogen lamps Dress code is business casual (suit with no vest and tie, no uniform). Hairdo code is liberal Working Environment # 3: Open landscaped working area for all, modern ergonomic working stations (not always permanently assigned to employees) Ergonomic revolving chair PDAs are sometimes used Conference room for large meetings and private conversations R&R area with TV, video and CD/DVD facilities Banners stressing corporate values Comfort features (coffee machine, food, plants) Children and pets are allowed in the office
  • Think performance TRUST STARTS TO BE VITAL  More informal atmosphere, room for private conversations; access to most of company info for everyone.  tolerance of personal life; flexible working hours – but still rules in what time employee should be there.  emotions are taking into focus – company vision, mission, motto, slogan in sign. (Boss need to establish trust for motivating his team).
  • Drawing: Cécile Périnelle-Michelet Working Environment # 4: Home or anywhere else, as the employee chooses.
  • Drawing: Cécile Périnelle-Michelet Latest notebook, connected to Internet No paper The employee works virtually (teleworker) Virtual work tools (webcam, speaker, headphones) Natural light or whatever preferred light Total freedom in dress code, hairdo code, furniture, working position, working hours Working Environment # 4: Home or anywhere else, as the employee chooses. Virtual conference room with text and voice chats, video and visuals Friendly family or other environment Mobile phone serving as modem, PDA
  • Think performance TRUST STARTS TO BE ESSENTIAL  Teleworking; Internetworking; Eworking; Web 2.0  Access to most company info and sharing knowledge; virtual teams, leadership is no more about the knowledge and skills but about attitude and behavior.  Position - Boss is more now as coordinator. All team members are equal and respected; diversity is welcome; trust is establish for sharing the same vision (which is now more „internal motivation factor“ for each team member – its not only company profit but mine too) and drive for goal achievement. Personal life and preferences are respected. Creativity is highly priced.
  • Generations
  • Think performance EACH GENERATION HAS A UNIQUE IMPRINT Four Generations of Workers • Veterans (1933-1945); 60-81 • Boomers (1946-1964); 50-68 • Gen X (1965-1980); 34-49 • Gen Y (Millennials) (1981-2000); 14-33
  • Think performance POPULATION Population By Generation 48 78 49 74 0 20 40 60 80 100 Veterans Boomers Gen X Gen Y Generations Population Count (millions) US Census 2005
  • Veterans (1933-1945)
  • Boomers (1946-1964)
  • Boomers (1946-1964)West Europe East Europe
  • Gen X (Latch-key) (1965-1980)
  • Gen Y (1981-2000)
  • Think performance PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF GENERATIONS
  • Think performance CORE VALUES Veterans (1933-1945) Respect for authority Conformers Discipline
  • Think performance CORE VALUES Veterans (1933-1945) Boomers (1946-1964) Respect for authority Conformers Discipline Optimism Involvement
  • Think performance CORE VALUES Veterans (1933-1945) Boomers (1946-1964) Gen X (1965-1980) Respect for authority Conformers Discipline Optimism Involvement Skepticism Fun Informality
  • Think performance CORE VALUES Veterans (1933-1945) Boomers (1946-1964) Gen X (1965-1980) Gen Y (Millennials) (1981-2000) Respect for authority Conformers Discipline Optimism Involvement Skepticism Fun Informality Realism Confidence Extreme fun Social
  • Think performance FAMILY Veterans (1933-1945) Boomers (1946-1964) Gen X (1965-1980) Gen Y (Millennials) (1981-2000) Traditional Nuclear Disintegrating Latch-key kids Merged families
  • Think performance EDUCATION Veterans (1933-1945) Boomers (1946-1964) Gen X (1965-1980) Gen Y (Millennials) (1981-2000) A dream A birthright A way to get there An incredible expenses
  • Think performance COMMUNICATION MEDIA Veterans (1933-1945) Boomers (1946-1964) Gen X (1965-1980) Gen Y (Millennials) (1981-2000) Rotary phones Memo One-on-one Touch –tone phones Call me anytime Cell phones Don't call me after work Text (SMS) Internet E-mail
  • Think performance WORK CHARACTERISTICS
  • Think performance WORK ETHIC AND VALUES Veterans (1933-1945) Boomers (1946-1964) Gen X (1965-1980) Gen Y (Millennials) (1981-2000) Hard work Respect authority Sacrifice Duty before fun Adhere to rules Workaholics Work efficiently Crusading causes Desire quality Question authority Eliminate the task Self-reliance Want structure and direction Skeptical What's next Multitasking Tenacity Entrepreneurial Tolerant Goal oriented WORK IS.... An obligation An exciting adventure A difficult challenge A contract A means to an end Fulfilment
  • Think performance LEADESRHIP STYLE Veterans (1933-1945) Boomers (1946-1964) Gen X (1965-1980) Gen Y (Millennials) (1981-2000) Directive Command-and- Control Consensual collegial Everyone is the same Challenge others Ask way ? (to be determined) INTERACTIVE STYLE Individual Team player Loves to have meetings Entrepreneur Participative
  • Think performance COMMUNICATIONS Veterans (1933-1945) Boomers (1946-1964) Gen X (1965-1980) Gen Y (Millennials) (1981-2000) Formal Memo In Person Direct Immediate E-mail Voice Mail FEEDBACK AND REWARDS No news is good news Satisfaction in a job well done Don't appreciate it Money Title recognition Sorry to interrupt but how am I doing? Freedom is the best reward Whenever I want it at the push of a button Meaningful work
  • Think performance MESSAGES THAT MOTIVATE Veterans (1933-1945) Boomers (1946-1964) Gen X (1965-1980) Gen Y (Millennials) (1981-2000) Your experience is respected You are valued you are needed Do it your way Forget the rules You will work with other bright and creative people WORK AND FAMILY LIFE Balance what is that? No balance Work to live Balance Balance
  • Generations gap
  • Think performance THE BIGGEST CHANGE  Our four generation workforce provides challenges
  • Think performance DEFINING TECHNOLOGY Veterans (1933-1945) Boomers (1946-1964) Gen X (1965-1980) Gen Y (Millennials) (1981-2000) Fax machine Personal computers Notebook Google Facebook
  • Think performance APPEARANCE OF THE LEADER
  • What is next Generations ?
  • Generation C
  • C for…..?
  • Content Creators Connected Co-creation Customise Community Curious Control ‘C’
  • 5 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT GEN C 1. They love creating and ‘mashing’ content 2. They are not passive, they form ‘active communities’ 3. They thrive on social media sites where they can get involved in ideas and cultural conversations 4. They’re in control of their own lives and are happy with complexity 5. Gen C aspire to work in more creative industries with less rigid social structures
  • Think performance YOUR TASK  You have 45 minutes to find something interesting on GENERATION topic on net  Prepare your power-point and be ready to presented to others  Think how this influence your work
  • Think performance Start Mentoring Provide Self- Teaching Resources Support Unique Career Paths CLOSING THE GAP Tips for Working Across Generations Millenials want to learn – cross tantly and informally. A mentoring program creates collaboration and learning opportunities that focus more on discussion and exposure to work experiences and less on step-by-step instruction. Millennials adapt easily to change and tend to work at a faster pace than other generations. Giving them resources to move forward by learning on their own, at their own pace, is critical. Traditional new-hire training can have a negative impact on millennial employees. Give them exposure to the company and encourage their personal growth – even if it involves switching departments.