Innovation Ecosystems and Network for Startups, Growth and Globalization,Ien japan12-13-12
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Innovation Ecosystems and Network for Startups, Growth and Globalization, IPRC, Tokyo Japan, December 13, 2012, Martha G Russell and Neil Rubens, IEN,

Innovation Ecosystems and Network for Startups, Growth and Globalization, IPRC, Tokyo Japan, December 13, 2012, Martha G Russell and Neil Rubens, IEN,

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Innovation Ecosystems and Network for Startups, Growth and Globalization,Ien japan12-13-12 Innovation Ecosystems and Network for Startups, Growth and Globalization,Ien japan12-13-12 Presentation Transcript

  • Innova&on  Ecosystems  -­‐   Network  Orchestra&on  for  Startups,  Growth  and  Globaliza&on       Martha  G  Russell,  PhD   MediaX  at  Stanford  University     Neil  Rubens,  PhD   University  of  Electro-­‐CommunicaAons     InnovaAon  Ecosystems  Network  
  • Overview  •  Ecosystem  PerspecAve  •  Data  Driven  VisualizaAons  of  InnovaAon   Ecosystems  •  Some  Examples   ECOSYSTEM   Heterogeneous  and  conAnuously   –  Silicon  Valley   evolving  set  of  firms  that  are   interconnected  through  a  complex –  Paris   global  network  of  relaAonships.   [Basole  et  al.,  2012]   –  Tokyo  •  ReflecAons  and  OpportuniAes  
  • H-­‐STAR     HUMAN  SCIENCES  AND  TECHNOLOGIES    at S T A N F O R D U N I V E R S I T Y ADVANCED  RESEARCH  INSTITUTE   RELATIONSHIP  INTERFACES  FOR  DISCOVERY  COLLABORATIONS     Goal:  Do  something  together  neither  of  us  could  do  by  ourselves.     Research  on  people  and  technology  —  how  people  use  technology,  how  to  be[er  design   technology  to  make  it  more  usable,  how  technology  affects  people’s  lives,  and  the  innova&ve   use  of  technologies  in  research,  educaAon,  art,  business,  commerce,  entertainment,   communicaAon,  security,  and  other  walks  of  life.    
  • The REAL Issueat S T A N F O R D U N I V E R S I T Y Deep Knowledge with Wide Applicability IN  THE  HEART  OF  SILICON  VALLEY    IN  A  CULTURE  OF  RAPID  ITERATION,  WHERE  DISRUPTION  IS  CELEBRATED    WHERE  TALENT,  INFORMATION  AND  CAPITAL  RESOURCES  FLOURISH   THE  ISSUE  IS  NOT  THE  RATE    TECHNOLOGY  TRANSFER    THE  ISSUE  IS  THE  EFFECTIVENESS  OF  INNOVATION  AND  KNOWLEDGE  TRANSFER      WE  CALL  THIS  “COLLABORATIVE  DISCOVERY”     The  Media  X  approach    WORK  ON  BOLD  IDEAS  WITH  BUSINESS,  TEST  SUCCESS/FAILURE  CONDITIONS,      ITERATE  RESULTS  QUICKLY,  TRANSFER  INSIGHTS  AT  EVERY  STAGE  
  • Stanford University Medical Media ! & Information Technology ! SUMMIT Distributed Vision Lab ! a t S T A N F O R D U! I V E R S I T Y N DVL Discovery Collaborations ! Electrical Engineering Psychology Span Stanford Labs! Computer Science EE Psy Linguistics Communication Between HumansPhilosophy Ling and Interactive Media CS CHIMe Phil SHL Stanford Humanities Lab Graduate School VHIL GSB Of BusinessVirtual Human Stanford CenterInteraction Lab SCIL for Innovations in Learning Center for the Study Of CSLI Language & Information Art Digital Art CenterEngineeringEng & Product Design School of Education; Ed Education and PBLL Law Learning SciencesWorkTechnology & Center forOrganization SSP Legal Des Stanford Joint PBLL Program in Design Project Based Informatics d.school Learning Symbolic LIFE Laboratory Systems Program Learning in Informal and Formal Environments
  • Stanford  spin-­‐offs  Over  2000  companies  started  by  faculty  students  and  alumni   •  Abrizio   •  NVIDIA   •  ASK  Computer  systems   •  Orbitz   •  Cisco  Systems,  Inc.   •  Octel  Communica&ons  Corp.   •  Dolby  Systems   •  Odwalla   •  eBay   •  ONI  Systems   •  E*Trade   •  PayPal   •  Electronic  Arts   •  Pure  SoWware,  Inc.   •  Excite,  Inc.   •  Rambus,  Inc.   •  Gap   •  Ra&onal  SoWware   •  Google   •  Silicon  Graphics,  Inc.   •  HewleT-­‐Packard   •  Sun  Microsystems   •  IDEO   •  Tandem  Computers,  Inc.   •  Intuit,  Inc.   •  Taiwan  Semiconductor   •  Learning  Company   •  Tensillica   •  Linked-­‐In   •  Tesla  Motors   •  Logitech   •  Trilogy   •  Mathworks   •  Varian  Associates,  Inc.   •  MIPS  Technologies,  Inc.   •  Vmware   •  Nike   •  Whole  Earth  Catalog   •  NeVlix   •  Yahoo!  Inc.  
  • Many Stakeholders in Innovation Ecosystem Startups   UAliAes,   Angels,     Industry   VC  firms,   AssociaAons   Incubators   Ecosystem   Banks  and   Law  Firms,   Financial   AccounAng   InsAtuAons   Firms   UniversiAes  
  • InnovaAon  Ecosystems  Approach  •  Networked  systems  perspecAve  to  examine  why,   when,  and  how  interfirm  networks  and  alliances   form  and  change  (GulaA  et  al.,  2000)  •  Co-­‐creaAon  creates  value  (Ramaswamy  &  Guillart,  2004)  •  Value  creaAon  requires  orchestraAon  among   firms  across  segments  (Basole  &  Karla,  2012;  Dhanaraj  &   Parkhe,  2006)  •  Responsiveness  to  changing  internal  and  external   forces  (Rubens  et  al.,  2011)  •  Shared  Vision  guides  and  accelerates   transformaAon  (Russell  et  al.,  2011)  
  • Shared Vision Transforms Iterative Impact Alignment Co-Create Value Shared   Vision   TransformaAon   Event Coalition Interact & FeedbackMartha G. Russell, Kaisa Still, Jukka Huhtamaki, and Neil Rubens, “Transforming innovation ecosystems through shared visionand network orchestration,” Triple Helix IX Conference, Stanford University, July 13, 2011.
  • “There  is  no  data  like  more  data”     (Mercer  at  Arden.  House,  1985)  500  Points   2,000  points   8,000  points  
  • More  Data  /     More  Dimensions  h[p://wissrech.ins.uni-­‐bonn.de/research/projects/engel/engelpr2/pr2_thumb.jpg   h[p://www.iro.umontreal.ca/~bengioy/yoshua_en/research_files/CurseDimensionality.jpg   Could  be  easier  to  find  paTerns  
  • TradiAonal  Data  Gathering  Methods    h[p://www.flickr.com/photos/tomatoskin/1339929731/  
  • Have  to  react  QUICKLY    h[p://www.flickr.com/photos/clydeorama/3495284608/  
  • OrganizaKons   News   Social   Data Source/ Organization News Social CharacteristicsAccuracy high average lowCoverage low average highTimeliness low high highRichness low average high
  • Infrastructure  for  Resource  Flows                                                                                -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  RelaAonships   The Way We USED to Think About Organizations New  OrganizaAonal  Chart  Based  on  RelaAonships   Relationship-Focused Co-Creation Infrastructure (Companies  are  interlocked  through  key   people  –  informaKon  flow,  norms,   mental  models.(Davis,1996)  
  • Growing  Importance  of  Networks  for  Business   Now   Geo-­‐dependence  is  rapidly  decreasing.     Importance  of  connecAons     Before   and  networks  is  increasing   Business  networks  are  highly  geo-­‐dependent.   16  
  • We  know  well  how  to  interpret:   How  do  we  interpret  this?   No a O Nokia Oyj Figure 1. Nokia & Microsoft -- Cumulative Network using SDC Alliance Data nok a Figure 1. Nokia & Microsoft -- Cumulative Network using SDC Alliance Data nokia h[p://networkx.lanl.gov/   17  
  • Alumni Entrepreneurial Leadership NetworksThe unique culture at Stanford: Is strongly oriented toward world-class research Expects socially-conscious, business-relevant intellectual leadership - at every level of its research, education, and service Facilitates frequent and fluid interaction with the business community Respects contributions from non-academic colleagues Fosters expectation that alumni will become innovators
  • Stanford  University  in  Silicon  Valley   Depth  2  
  • Two  Pizza  Rule  Five  Tips  for  Startups  in  Agile  Ecosystem  1.  Fail  forward:  Always  ready-­‐for–feedback      If  something  doesn’t  work,  change  it  –  ASAP  2.  Take  personal  responsibility    Don’t  blame  anyone  3.  Create  success  from  failure  by  sharing  what  you  learned    Each  failure  includes  lessons  for  success  –  share  them!  4.  Start  again    Immediately  5.  Don’t  do  it  alone    Know,  culAvate  and  orchestrate  your  network  
  • Play  (and  listen)  like  a  Jazz  Band  
  • CapDigital  -­‐  Regional  Sector  Catalyst  Shared  Vision  To  catalyze  the  new  digital   infrastructure  in  France   with  global   connecAons  To  create  an  ecosystem  to   facilitate  the   relaAonship  between   France  and  global   market  Enable  Paris  to  become   global  region  of  the   market  for  digital   services        How  do  you  spend  money  locally  to  enhance  global  parAcipaAon  in  a  way  that  returns  the  benefit  back  home?   22  
  • Ecosystem  View  of  IntervenAon  OpportuniAes  A  Regional  Case  Study  –  Digital  Media  in  France   Zone  1:  VC  Community   Zone  3  of  Parisian  Two-­‐Level   InnovaAon  Ecosystem   Zone  2:  New  CapDigital   Members   Pale Red: French companyIEN  2010   Dark Red: CapDigital memberSelected  Paris  &  French  companies  Linked  people  &  venture/financing  enAAes   Light Green: Foreign Venture/ firmLinked  companies,  people  &  v/f  enAAes   Dark Green: French venture firm Zone  4:  Lifestyle  Businesses    1  degree    2  degree   Blue: Foreign company
  • Startup  Tokyo   Tokyo  ICT  Startup   companies  &  people   w/  intl  orientaAon    for  growth  &  funding   (preliminary)  Nodes Edges company employment people founder investment
  • Startup  Tokyo   Tokyo  ICT  Startup   companies  &  people   w/  intl  orientaAon    for  growth  &  funding   (preliminary)       Expanding  the  network   one  step  brings  in   internaAonal  enAAes  Nodes Edges company employment people founder investment
  • Network  Expansion   Startup  Tokyo  Depth:  1   Tokyo  ICT  Startup   companies  &  people   Nodes:  245  (0.01%  Visible)   w/  intl  orientaAon   Edges:  55  (0.01%  Visible)    for  growth  &  funding   Total    Depth:  2   Nodes:  221,686     Expanding  the  network   Edges:  324,396   two  steps  brings  in  21%   of  global  enAAes   100 percentage  of  total  network   edges  Depth:  3   75 nodes   50Depth:  max   25 0 1 2 3 max network  depth  
  • ReflecAons    Free  exchange  of  informaAon  and   respect  for  uncertainAes  and   serendipity     RelaAonships  provide  access  to   informaAon,  financial  resources,   talent     Skill  of  the  21st  Century  =       Network  OrchestraAon     28
  • What Can We Do Together That Neither of Us Could Do Alone? Thank You at S T A N F O R D U N I V E R S I T Y www.innovation-ecosystems.co Martha.Russell@stanford.ed http://mediax.stanford.edu neil@activeintelligence.org•  Innovation Ecosystems Require Network Orchestration –  Know –  Cultivate –  Orchestrate