Trends and issues ppt

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Trends and issues ppt

  1. 1. TRENDS AND ISSUES IN INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY Gaming and learning Martha Rice ITED 501—Instructional Technology Foundations Texas A&M Texarkana
  2. 2. Serious Gaming…  includes educational video games, simulations, and virtual worlds  presents real world problems  is NOT simply drills or questions to answer  keeps with theories of Constructivism  creates intensive learning opportunities  bases learning on sound pedagogy
  3. 3. Games help students learn to… • link abstractions with concrete learning • make mental models • work together • make decisions and accept consequences • study smarter • strategize • solve problems • think critically • recognize patterns and visual cues
  4. 4. Virtual Worlds and Simulations:  Expansive interactive environments and complex resources allow learners to make and test hypotheses.  Simplified microcosm teaches learners about more complex real world.  Learners can experience working as an expert in the field.  Learners can experiment, especially with what would be prohibitively expensive or dangerous in real life.  Not widely used in k-12 education yet.
  5. 5. Creating Motivation  Digital natives like video games.  Learning occurs in places where learners feel safe and able to take risks.  Serious games are engaging and interesting.  Learners earn rewards for learning.  Problems are hard enough to challenge, but easy enough to conquer.  Players begin to feel ownership of their learning through the game.  Video games teach complex skills through scaffolding process.  Students can collaborate to solve challenges.
  6. 6. Personalized learning  Serious games can inspire learners when traditional classroom instruction fails.  Games can be adapted to appropriate skill and mastery levels; most games adapt themselves according to player inputs.  Games reward players for what they do right, recognizing players’ strengths.  Games use multiple senses, learning methods.  Games are nonlinear so students can move from one skill area to another, avoiding frustration.
  7. 7. Risks and rewards  Video game players expect to fail before they can succeed in mastering a task.  Serious games provide positive experiences in failure, in contrast to negative feelings that come with failure in traditional face-to-face education.  Because failure is acceptable in serious gaming, serious gaming creates a risk-free environment for students, and creates a stronger learning experience.
  8. 8. Reflection and Feedback  Video games provide learners with instant feedback about their decisions and actions.  Serious games allow learners time to stop and think about problems.  Serious games that build in reflection after the task are actually more effective than teacher-led feedback.  Serious games encourage learners to think about what they think they know.
  9. 9. Proven results:  Military simulations: real expertise and fewer mistakes in reality  K-12 education: better standardized scores  Higher retention of active learning  Health care simulations: quality professional development  Business: high-level training that can be accessed anywhere, anytime
  10. 10. Suggestions for k-12  Teachers should use serious gaming to tap into digital learners’ natural interests, not dwell on 19th century learning methodology.  Serious gaming is worth the time investment, and is not counter-productive to assessment goals.  Continued use of serious gaming across curricula helps standardize terminology and educational experience and measuring students’ growth.  Curriculum modules should be created for use with popular consumer games.
  11. 11. Resources An, Y.J., & Bonk, C.J. (2009, May/June). Finding that SPECIAL PLACE: designing digital game-based learning environments. Tech Trends, 53(3) Driscoll, M.P. (2005). Psychology of learning for instruction. Boston: Pearson. Federation of American Scientists. (2006). Summit on educational games: harnessing the power of video games for learning. Retrieved from http://www.fas.org/gamesummit/Resources/Summit%20on%20Educational%20Games.pdf Kelly, H. (2005). Games, cookies, and the future of education. Issues in Science and Technology, Retrieved from http://www.fas.org/gamesummit/Resources/issues in SnT henry kelly.pdf Kelton, A.J. (2008, September/October). Virtual Worlds? "Outlook Good". Educause, 43(5), Retrieved from www.educause.edu Lamb, A., & Johnson, L. (2010). BeyondGoogling: Applying Google Tools to Inquiry-based Learning. Teacher Librarian, 37(4), 83. Retrieved from MasterFILE Premier database. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=f5h&AN=50300803&site=ehost-live Mansour, S., & El-Said, M. (2009). Multi-Players Role- Playing Educational Serious Games: A Link between Fun and Learning. International Journal of Learning, 15(11), 229-239. Retrieved from Education Research Complete database. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ehh&AN=40825465&site=ehost-live Osterweil, S., Austin, A.C., Drzaic, K., & Roy, D. (2006). Unifying education and game in educational games. Comparitive Media Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. Retrieved from http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/library/papers/mit_june2006.pdf Reese, D. (2007). First Steps and beyond: Serious Games as Preparation for Future Learning. Journal of Educational Multimediaand Hypermedia, 16(3), 283-300. Retrieved from ERIC database. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ776071&site=ehost-live A review of recent games and simulation research. (2006). The Center For Technology In Education, Johns Hopkins, Columbia, MD. Retrieved from http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/library/papers/cte_november2006.pdf Schollmeyer, J. (2006). Games get serious. Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 62(4), 34-39. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=21722477&site=ehost-live Squire, K. (2008). Video Game-Based Learning: An Emerging Paradigm for Instruction. Performance Improvement Quarterly, 21(2), 7-36. Retrieved from ERIC database. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ823843&site=ehost-live Ulicsak, M., & Wright, M. (2010). Games in education: serious games. Bristol, Futurelab. Retrieved from http://www.futurelab.org.uk

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