Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Session 2   Restraint Principles   Sheep
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Session 2 Restraint Principles Sheep

15,528

Published on

Published in: Business, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
15,528
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
318
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Session 2: Restraint of Sheep, Goats and Swine
  • 2. Positional Terminology  Recumbent: Refers to lying down or back  Lateral: Refers to the side  Dorsal: Refers to the back(spine side)  Sternal: Refers to the underside (sternum/abdomen)
  • 3. Know Normal Behavior  Important in determining which restraint technique to use  Differences between species
  • 4. Sheep Terminology  “Ovine”  Ruminant Herbivores – Ewe: Female of reproductive age – Ram: Intact male of reproductive age – Lamb: young sheep of either sex – Wether: neutered adult male – Mutton: meat derived from adult sheep
  • 5. Sheep Production  Economical & efficient production of meat, wool and milk Combination Meat Breeds Wool Breeds Breeds Suffolk Rambouillet Polypay Dorset Merino Texel Hampshire Debouillet Tunis Southdown Columbia Leicester Oxford Targhee Cheviot Shropshire
  • 6. Sheep Meat Breeds Oxford Dorset Suffolk http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/
  • 7. Sheep Wool Breeds Rambouillet Targhee Merino http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/
  • 8. Sheep Behavior  VERY herd conscious – usually driven in bunches  “Safety in numbers”  Wide visual field - ~ 270°  Highly sensitive to excessive noise
  • 9. Sheep Behavior: Fight or Flight  Different responses to handling based on breed  White-faced wool breeds have greater flocking instinct  Fight or Flight zone depends on where sheep is raised: Barn raised – shorter flight zone Rarely saw people – bigger flight zone
  • 10. Sheep Behavior  Very athletic! – Will climb over each other when driven into enclosures – BEWARE: Lambs can sustain traumatic injuries - use care when driving them!  When angry, will stamp front feet or head butt (especially rams!)
  • 11. Capture and Restraint of Sheep  “Work” flock into small pen or enclosures  Approach individual slowly  Capture animal by putting one arm around its neck and front quarters then quickly wrapping other hand around rear quarters and grabbing its tail stump (dock)  Guide animal into desired area for treatment
  • 12. Capture and Restraint of Sheep  Can use Shepherd’s Crook – Use to hook a back leg in the hock area – Work quickly so animal doesn’t fight crook and break its leg
  • 13. Restraint of Sheep  RUMPING – Very easy method of immobilizing animal for routine husbandry – Hoof trimming – Shearing wool – SQ vaccinations
  • 14. http://www3.northampton.edu/club/navta/Fall2006.pdf Animal rests on its hind quarters to enable technicians to clean and trim its hooves and conduct a physical exam. Note: the animal’s back is supported against the legs of its restrainer
  • 15. http://www3.northampton.edu/club/navta/Fall2006.pdf Obtain pulse rate from Femoral Artery Normal pulse rate in sheep is 70-90 BPM
  • 16. Important! NEVER NEVER grab a sheep or a mohair goat by the wool!  Causes subcutaneous bruising, ruins the wool for market  And it hurts!
  • 17. Don’t be Baaaaaaashful… Questions?
  • 18. Goat Terminology  “Caprine”  Ruminant Herbivores  Doe: female  Buck: intact male  Kid: baby goat – either sex  Wether: castrated male
  • 19. Goats Raised for meat, milk, fiber and hides Dairy Breeds Meat Breeds Fiber Breeds Nubian Boer Alpine Spanish Apine LaMancha Myotonic Pygora Saanen Pygmy Toggenberg Kiko
  • 20. Saanen Dairy Breeds Nubian Alpine http://fiascofarm.com/goats/breeds.htm
  • 21. Kiko Meat Breeds Boer Spanish http://fiascofarm.com/goats/breeds.htm
  • 22. Fiber Breeds Pygora Angora http://fiascofarm.com/goats/breeds.htm
  • 23. Goat Behavior  Highly social animals!  Flock together in extended family groups  Males and females will establish social dominance via fighting  Use horns for fighting, so group the herd according to whether they’re horned or de- horned
  • 24. Goat Behavior  Unlike sheep, they will not stay together when herded, instead will scatter  Best to ID the lead goat (usually a doe) and guide her into pen and the others will follow
  • 25. Goat Behavior  Generally docile and handled easily use the  Goats DON’T tolerate rough minimum treatment amount of restraint necessary!  If you’re rough, they get agitated and will try to butt
  • 26. Goat Behavior Hair raised along spine Warning Stamping foot Signs! Sneezing/Snorting Rearing up on hind legs
  • 27. Goat Capture and Restraint To capture: grab one of its front legs and lift animal; Can use shepherd’s crook Push animal against a wall/fence with your legs and hips to restrain it Place knee firmly in animal’s flank
  • 28. Goat Restraint  Do not rump a goat to do any procedure!  Back animal’s hindquarters into a corner, and straddle animal at the shoulders while holding its head (good for TPR, and venipuncture) Normal pulse rate in goats is 70-90 BPM
  • 29. Goat Restraint Methods  Flanking – Leaves the animal laterally recumbent
  • 30. Goats: Restraining the Head  Necessary for eye exams, oral meds and jugular blood collection  Two methods: – Place hands on cheeks, wrap fingers around jawbone and hold firmly – Grasp beard with one hand and encircle neck with the other to stabilize head* * Beware mating season!!
  • 31. Restraining for Venipuncture  Cephalic Venipuncture – Straddle goat’s shoulders, place one hand around neck to stabilize head. Use other hand to hold out leg, “roll” vein and stabilize elbow.  Jugular Venipuncture – Back goat into corner and push it sideways into wall. Use one hand to hold head to the side and one hand to hold off the vein
  • 32. Questions?
  • 33. QUESTION OF THE DAY… If a pig loses its voice, is it disgruntled ?
  • 34. Swine Terminology  “Porcine”  Monogastric omnivores – Sow = Adult female – Boar = Adult male – Piglet/Farrow = Young – Gilt = Sexually mature female, no litter yet – Barrow = Castrated male
  • 35. Swine Breeds: Top Breeds American Yorkshire Duroc http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/ Hampshire
  • 36. Swine Behavior  Intelligent, stubborn, vocal and at times vicious  Easily frightened due to poor eyesight  Can be incredibly dangerous to restrain  When stressed or treated roughly, can become hyperthermic easily!
  • 37. Swine Behavior  When aggressive, pigs will use sharp teeth  Unlike sheep and goats, pigs can’t be herded;  Will come to the rescue of a distressed herd mate! Beware! ALWAYS have an escape route when working with pigs!
  • 38. Tools for Capture and Restraint  Pig Boards – Flat, solid piece of wood, plastic, metal large enough to cover handler’s legs – Use as barrier to move pig in direction you want – Make sure board is touching ground, otherwise pig will try to go under it
  • 39. Tools for Capture and Restraint  Paddles – Flat board on a long stick – Gently tap pig on shoulder, rump or side of face to direct it in direction you want – Do NOT slap the pig with the paddle. It will become enraged and you will NOT win!
  • 40. Capture and Restraint of Pigs  Lifting pigs – Use on pigs > 50lbs – Good for castration, vaccination and administering meds
  • 41. Tools for Restraint  Hog Snare – Long metal pole with cable loop on end – Use for large pigs – Dangle loop in front of pig’s snout; when pig opens mouth, push loop into mouth behind tusks and tighten – Move quickly, as pig will whip around to get free.
  • 42. Tools for Restraint  V-Trough – Used for placing smaller pigs on their back – Stretch pig’s legs to secure ropes – Stretch pig’s neck for venipuncture
  • 43. Questions?
  • 44. Have a Great Week!

×