Mars-Philter Retail Advertising Council Event Synopsis

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  • 1. A SYNOPSIS OF THE TORONTORAC SYMPOSIUMMAY 4, 2011
  • 2. 4 YEARS AGO WHEN WE FIRST ATTENDEDTHIS EVENT, THE SPEAKERS WERE SHARINGTOPICS AND CASE STUDIES ON FLYERDISTRIBUTION AND REACH. WE WERE TALK-ING ABOUT PRINTING AND REACH. AND THEMENTION OF DIGITAL WASN’T SOMETHINGTHAT TOUCHED THE LIVES OF THE PEOPLE INTHIS PARTICULAR ROOM. THIS MONTH’SCONFERENCE COULDN’T HAVE BEEN MOREDIFFERENT, WITH LARGE PRINTERS LIKETRANSCONTINTENTAL GIVING TALKS ONSOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGY AND OTHERSSPEAKING ABOUT SHOPPERS AND MOBILE.
  • 3. PRINT MAY NOT BE DEAD,AS WE WE ASSURED MANYTIMES, BUT IT’S CERTAINLYBEING AUGMENTED IN THEMARKETING PLANS ANDBUDGETS OF MAJOR RETAIL-ERS ACROSS CANADA.
  • 4. KEYNOTE:PARTNERS IN CHANGE –INFORMATION TECHNOLOGYAND MARKETING
  • 5. THERE’S A NEW DEFINITION OF POS:POINT OF SERVICE.RETAILERS MUST START TO USETECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE THESHOPPING EXPERIENCE. THIS MEANSUSING A POS SYSTEM TO TRACK ANDMANAGE CUSTOMERS, PRODUCTS ANDSTORE INFORMATION.
  • 6. WE’VE HEARD IT MANY TIMES BEFORE:OUR SHOPPERS HAVE MORE ANDBETTER TECHNOLOGY THAN WE DO.SO HOW DO WE EXPECT JUNIOR ANDSENIOR STAFF ALIKE TO BE ABLE TOPROVIDE A SERVICE WHEN CUSTOMERSKNOW MORE ABOUT THE PRODUCT (ANDTHE COMPETITION) THAN STAFF DO?
  • 7. AND MUCH OF THIS SHOPPERINTELLIGENCE IS AROUND PRICE.THE PHRASE “PRICE TRANSPARENCY”IS EVERYWHERE. RETAILERS MUSTCOME UP WITH A REASON FORPEOPLE TO SHOP THEIR STORE.AND IT COMES DOWN TO A UNIQUEIN-STORE EXPERIENCE.
  • 8. THE AMAZON EFFECT:YOU MUST PREVENT YOURSTORE FROM GETTINGHIJACKED BY OTHERRETAILERS, OR YOURBRICKS AD MORTARSTORE WILL BECOME ANEXPENSIVE SHOWROOM.
  • 9. SO HOW IS TECHNOLOGYCHANGING RETAILING?THIS TIME LAST YEAR ONLY64% OF CANADIAN RETAILERSHAD A SOCIAL MEDIASTRATEGY, TODAY IT’S CLOSERTO 85-90%. WHY?MOBILE.
  • 10. SO WHAT DOES THISALL MEAN?OPERATIONS AND MARKETINGMUST BE BETTER TIED TOGETHERTO BE ABLE TO DELIVER ON ANEXPERIENCE.THE CMO HAS TO SIT AT THE TABLEWITH CIO AND BE INVOLVED INDRIVING CONVERSATIONS ABOUTTECHNOLOGY.
  • 11. RETAILERS HAVE TO LOOK ATMARKETING, TECHNOLOGYAND BUSINESS OPERATIONSAS A WHOLE.AND WE MUST IMPLEMENTTECHNOLOGY THAT CONNECTSWITH CUSTOMERS TO MAKETHEIR LIVES EASIER.
  • 12. HOW DO WE PROVE VALUE?FIND MORE RELEVANT WAYS TOMEASURE SUCCESS. IT’S NOT JUSTABOUT ROI OR BASKET SIZE. IT’SABOUT CREATING INSIGHTS BASEDON THE MANY SHOPPERS IN OURSTORES. 40% OF DRUG/GROCERYSHOPPERS ARE BUYING FORPEOPLE OUTSIDE OF THE FAMILY:ELDERLY PARENTS OR KIDS INUNIVERSITY. HOW DO WE MEASUREAND MARKET TO THIS BEHAVIOUR?
  • 13. UNDERSTANDING OUR SHOPPER ISKEY. AND THIS GOES BEYOND OUT-DATED CRM SYSTEMS. FACEBOOKIS THE MOST UP-TO-DATE CRM INTHE WORLD, IN A SENSE. IT’SCURRENT, IN SOME CASES, UP TOTHE HOUR. HOW CAN RETAILERSTAP INTO THIS WITH THEIR SOCIALMEDIA STRATEGY?
  • 14. LET’S START THINKING ABOUTUSING SHOPPER INSIGHTSBASED ON REAL TIME SALES TODRIVE MARKETING PROGRAMS.BUT THIS CAN ONLY HAPPEN IFWE USE THE I.T. GROUP AS PARTOF THE EXECUTIONAL ARM OFMARKETING.WE SHOULD ALL BE WORKINGTOWARD A SINGLE VERSION OFTHE TRUTH.
  • 15. TO STAY AHEAD OFSHOPPERS WE MUSTDO WHAT’S NEXT.THE TECHNOLOGY OF TODAYIS NOT THE TECHNOLOGY OFTOMORROW.
  • 16. BREAKOUT SESSIONTHE SOCIAL SHOPPER:A LENS INTO THE FUTURE OFRETAIL EXPERIENCES.STEVE MAST, DELVINIA
  • 17. WITH SO MANY DIGITALOPTIONS, WHAT SHOULDRETAILERS ANDMANUFACTURERS DO?FIRST – UNDERSTAND WHATTECHNOLOGY YOUR SHOP-PERS ARE ACTUALLY USINGAND HOW THEY’RE USING IT.
  • 18. 75% OF CANADIANS HAVEMADE AN ONLINE PURCHASEIN THE LAST 2 MONTHS. BUT ITWAS AN ONLINE DOWNLOADOF APPS, MUSIC AND BOOKS.MOST SHOPPERS ARE USINGDIGITAL FOR RESEARCH BUTMOBILE IS STARTING TOCHANGE THIS WITH SHOPPERSNOW RESEARCHING PRODUCTSON THE WAY TO THE STORE ORIN THE AISLE.
  • 19. 53% LOOK ON SOCIAL NETWORKSAND ONLINE FOR COUPONSAND PROMOS.65% OF CANADIANS LOOKONLINE FOR PEER REVIEWSBEFORE BUYING.SURPRISINGLY, THEY ARE NOTGOING ONLINE TO FIND RETAILERADDRESSES OR PHONE NUMBERSBECAUSE TOO FEW RETAILERSHAVE MOBILE WEBSITES.
  • 20. SHOPPERS AND MOBILE:MOBILE IS ACTING AS A BRIDGEBETWEEN THE ONLINE AND OFFLINEWORLDS.1 IN 5 CANADIANS ARE SEARCHINGFOR PRODUCT INFO WHILE THEY ARESTANDING IN THE AISLES.IN 2010 25% OF SHOPPERS USEDTHEIR PHONE TO SEARCH FOR PRICES–UP FROM 12% IN 2009.
  • 21. SHOPPERS AND SOCIAL MEDIA:SHOPPERS ARE LOOKING FORDEALS AND PROMOTIONS ON YOURSOCIAL SITES.THEY WANT TO SHARE THOUGHTS ANDIDEAS WITH YOU. AND THEY WANTYOUR FEEDBACK ON THEIR FEEDBACK.AKA: A CONVERSATION.THEY WANT BETTER INTEGRATIONACROSS ALL DIGITAL MEDIA NOT ASEPERATE MESSAGES ON FACEBOOK,TWITTER, MOBILE AND WEBSITEPROPERTIES.
  • 22. SHOPPERS AND QR CODES:4 OUT OF 5 SMARTPHONE USERS KNOW WHAT AQR CODE IS, VERSUS 2 OUT OF 5 A YEAR AGO.40% HAVE A READER INSTALLED. BUT A URL ISSTILL THEIR #1 WAY TO ACCESS CONTENT.22% ARE INTERESTED IN OR HAVE USED QRCODES BUT THEY WANT REAL VALUE ATTACHEDTO THEM, NOT JUST A VIDEO OR LINK.INSTRUCTIONS ARE CRITICAL. DON’T MAKESHOPPERS GUESS HOW TO USE IT.
  • 23. SHOPPERS ARE ASKING FOR:1. COLLABORATION WITH RETAILERS AND MANUFACTURERS2. THEY WANT TO INFLUENCE IN-STORE EXPERIENCES3. REATILERS TO ANTICIPATE WHAT’S NEXT. LET THEM ACT AS A LENS INTO THE RETAIL EXPERIENCE.
  • 24. IT’S TIME FOR RETAILERS TO LEARNFROM THE MISTAKES OF THE MUSICAND PUBLISING INDUSTRIES. WESTILL HAVE THE TIME TO PUT A GREATSTRATEGY TOGETHER TO MAKE SUREWE’RE WORKING WITH SHOPPERSAND CONSUMERS AND NOT FIGHT-ING AGAINST THEM.
  • 25. BREAKOUT SESSIONPHYGITAL MARKETINGDR. JOHN REEVES, KYP
  • 26. PHYGITAL IS NOT JUST ASTRANGE WORD. IT’S ADISCIPLINE THAT SEEKS TOCREATE A SEAMLESS LINKFROM THE PRINT WORLDTO THE DIGITAL WORLD.
  • 27. AND IT’S A DISCIPLINETHAT IS STRIVING TOUNDERSTAND MOREFULLY THE NATURE OF THEINCREASINGLY DIGITIZEDCONSUMER. IT’S KEY TOAPPLY THE EXPECTATIONSOF THE CONSUMER ANDTHE SHOPPER TO THECUSTOMER PATHWAY.
  • 28. THERE IS A SEQUENTIALNATURE TO HOW CHANNELSINTERACT WITH ONEANOTHER, AND EACHONE HAS ITS OWN ROLE.THE PHYSICAL CHANNEL ISTHE MOST EMOTIONAL ONE.
  • 29. BUT THE CUSTOMERNEEDS TO KNOW WHYSHE’S BEING SENTONLINE. IT’S CRITICALTO ESTABLISH A CLEARREASON WITH YOURPHYSICAL COMPONENT.
  • 30. IT’S A FACT THAT HUMANSLIKE TO START WITH WHATTHEY KNOW.IN ORDER TO USHER THEMTHROUGH AN UNFAMILIARPROCESS, YOU’RE GOINGTO NEED TO MAKE THEMCOMFORTABLE FIRST.
  • 31. AND SO TO MAKE THE LINKBETWEEN THESE WORLDS,WE USE BRIDGINGTECHNOLOGIES, LIKERFID, QR CODES, DVDs(NOT SO MUCH ANYMORE),AND NOW WEB KEYS.
  • 32. A WEB KEY IS ANEASY WAY TO GETPEOPLE ONLINE,AND TO VERY SPE-CIFIC CONTENT. IT LAUNCHESTHE USER’S BROWSER WHENIT’S INSERTED INTO THE USBPORT, SO NAVIGATION AND LONGURLS TO TYPE IN ARE NO LONGERA CONCERN.
  • 33. WHAT’S ALSOGREAT ABOUTTHIS TACTIC ISTHAT IT TAKESSEARCH ENGINES OUT OF THEEQUATION, WHICH MEANS YOUHAVE A LOWER RISK OF LOSINGTHE CUSTOMER THROUGHTHE PROCESS.
  • 34. THE WEB KEY SERVES AS APHYSICAL HOMEPAGE THATLAUNCHES YOU TO THE DIGITALSPACE. IT’S PERSONALIZED,IT HAS COMPELLING METRICSATTACHED TO IT, AND IT REDUC-ES PASSWORD REQUIREMENTS,FUNCTIONING AS A GREATPOINT OF SERVICE.
  • 35. AND LIKE ANY GREAT DIRECTMAIL PIECE, WITH DIMENSIONALITYCOMES RESPONSE. YOURPHYSICAL PIECE SHOULDREPRESENT AS MUCH AS DOESYOUR DIGITAL PIECE. THE MOREVALUABLE CONTENT YOU PUT INYOUR PRINT PIECE, THE BETTER.THE POINT IS TO ENGAGE INTHE PHYSICAL WORLD, ANDCURATE THE INFORMATION INTHE DIGITAL WORLD.
  • 36. KEYNOTEFROM FLYERS TO FACEBOOKBRAD MURPHYDARRELL COOK
  • 37. THE WAYS IN WHICH WEREACH OUT TO SHOPPERS ISEVOLVING. THE FLYER HASN’TGONE AWAY, BUT IT CANNOTBE A RETAILER’S ONLY WAYOF DELIVERING CONTENT.
  • 38. THINK OF THE PAPER FLYERAS ANCHOR TENANT.AND NOW DETERMINE HOWEVERY OTHER COMMUNICATIONTOOL CAN HELP SUPPORT ANDMAKE THAT PAPER FLYER WORKHARDER.
  • 39. RETAIL COMMUNICATIONBREAKDOWN LOOKS LIKE THIS:STORE COMMERCE = IN-STORE MARKETING AND POPECOMMERCE = SEARCH AND WEBMOBILE COMMERCE = APPS AND AN OPTIMIZED SITEINTERACTIVE COMMERCE = VIDEO AND AUDIOSOCIAL COMMERCE = TWITTER, FACEBOOK AND BLOGS
  • 40. NO MATTER WHAT TOOLS YOUCHOOSE, RETAILERS SHOULDHAVE SUBJECT MATTER EX-PERTS THAT CAN KEEP YOUINFORMED AND UP TO DATE.ON THE LATEST FEATURESAND FUNCTIONALITY.
  • 41. AND WHERE DOES ALL OF THISCONTENT COME FROM?THERE CAN BE RETAILER-BRANDEDCONTENT.VENDOR SUPPLIED CONTENT THAT ISPRODUCT- OR BRAND-SPECIFIC.USER-GENERATED CONTENT – CREATEDBY YOUR SHOPPERS AND CONSUMERS.
  • 42. SO RETAILERS, IT’S TIMETO ASK YOURSELVES,“HOW AGILE ISMY CONTENT?”HOW CAN A PRODUCTOFFERING LIVE OFFLINEAND ONLINE?
  • 43. AND NOW, HOW DO YOUMEASURE SUCCESS?RETAILERS UNDERSTANDPRINT FLYERS. AFTER ALLTHESE YEARS, YOU KNOWHOW MUCH IT COSTS, HOW ITWORKS AND HOW SHOPPERSWILL ACT AND REACT.
  • 44. BUT NOT ALL SHOPPERS CANBE FOUND WITH A FLYER.RETAILERS SHOULD START DEVELOPINGA CONTENT PREFERENCE SYSTEM. FEEDSHOPPERS THE CONTENT THEY WANTTHE WAY THEY WANT IT AND BASED ONTHEIR CURRENT NEEDS. HAVING A RICHUP-TO-DATE CRM DATABASE ALLOWSYOU TO UNDERSTAND WHAT THE SHOP-PER IS BUYING AND HOW THEY WANTTO INTERACT WITH YOUR STORE.
  • 45. IF YOU’RE NOT ALREADY,IT’S TIME TO START TESTINGAND LEARNING. FIGURE OUTWHAT A MOBILE NUMBER ISWORTH TO YOU. WHAT ABOUTA LIKE ON FACEBOOK? AND INTHE BIGGER PICTURE, WHATIS EACH CHANNEL WORTH?FROM HERE YOU CAN MAKETHE RIGHT INVESTMENTFOR YOUR STORE AND YOURCUSTOMERS.
  • 46. KEYNOTETHE CHANGING FACEOF RETAIL IN CANADAJOHN TORELLABILL GOWNJACK BAILLIEELIZABETH DUTTON
  • 47. WHAT ARE THE BIGTRENDS IN THE RETAILSECTOR RIGHT NOW?CUSTOMERS ARE MORE KNOWLEDGE-ABLE THAN EVER BEFORE.PRICE IS SO TRANSPARENT THAT IT’SDRIVING DOWN MARGINS.TRADITIONAL MARKETING ANDADVERTISING BUDGETS ARE STILLTHERE BUT WE MUST ALSO FINDBUDGETS FOR DIGITAL AND SOCIAL.
  • 48. WHAT DOES THISALL MEAN?RETAILERS AND CONSUM-ERS ARE FEELING THATTHERE IS A LOT OF CHOICE.BUT THIS ALSO LEADS TO ALOT OF CONFUSION.
  • 49. RETAILERS ARE SAYINGWE HAVE TO BE MORECUSTOMER-CENTRIC BUTTHIS IS RHETORIC, NOTREALITY. YOU NEED TOUNDERSTAND YOUR CUS-TOMER BETTER SO YOU CANEMBRACE THE DIFFERENCESIN GEOGRAPHY AND DEMO-GRAPHICS AND BETTER MEETTHEIR NEEDS.
  • 50. SUCCESSFUL RETAILCOMMUNICATIONSSHOULD BE LINKED TO:BUILDING SALES GROWTH ANDBUILDING THE BRAND VALUE.
  • 51. LOOK AT THE BRANDEXPERIENCE. IS ITCONSISTENT?A LOT OF THIS EXPERIENCE ISDELIVERED ON THE FLOOR. SO HOWDO YOU MAKE EMPLOYEES FEEL APART OF THE PROCESS? BEFOREYOU TELL YOUR STORY EXTERNALLYMAKE SURE YOU TELL IT INTERNALLY.
  • 52. BREAKOUT SESSIONAIR MILES’ LEVERAGINGSOCIAL MEDIA AND MOBILEERIN WALDIE
  • 53. GETTING STARTED ON A SOCIALMEDIA PLAN CAN BE A DAUNTINGTASK. SO IT’S BEST TO FOLLOWSOME TRIED AND TRUE RULESAND USE FORRESTER’S POST:
  • 54. PEOPLESTART RESEARCHING HOW PEOPLEINTERACT WITH YOUR BRAND.HOW ARE THEY TALKING ABOUTYOUR BRAND NOW?
  • 55. OBJECTIVESCLEARLY DEFINE YOUR OBJECTIVES.IS IT FEEDBACK? IS IT TALKINGTO PEOPLE? IS IT TO BUILD ACOMMUNITY? THEN FIND WAYSTO RESPOND TO AND EMBRACETHE FEEDBACK FROM YOURCOMMUNITY.
  • 56. STRATEGYNOW LOOK AT HOW YOUR PART-NERS (INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL)CAN PLAY A ROLE.
  • 57. TECHNOLOGYTHE AGE OLD QUESTION:JOIN OR BUILD? ARE YOU JOININGA CONVERSATION OR WILL YOUBUILD AN EXCLUSIVE PLACE FORYOUR FANS TO INTERACT?
  • 58. DURING YOUR RESEARCH STAGE,ASK MEMBERS AND PROSPECTIVEMEMBERS WHAT TYPES OF CON-TENT THEY WOULD BE WILLINGTO SHARE.AND THEN GET OUT THERE ANDSTART TO TEST YOUR IDEAS.AIRMILES STARTED WITH A “SHAREYOUR MEMORIES” PROMO BYSIMPLY CREATING DIGITAL PROMOSAND MAKING THEM SOCIAL.
  • 59. THEY CREATED A LINK BETWEENSOCIAL ACTIVITY AND OFFLINEACTIVITY BY USING THE SAMELOYALTY NUMBER FROM USERS’CARDS AS THEIR LOG-IN ONTHE SITE. THE RESULTS: 10,000MEMBERS SIGNED UP IN THEFIRST 5 DAYS.
  • 60. THE PREDICTION ATAIRMILES: IN 1-2 YEARSMOBILE BROWSINGWILL START TO EXCEEDDESKTOP BROWSING.BUT ARE RETAILERS ANDSHOPPERS WANTING THESAME RESULTS?
  • 61. RETAILERS WANT:IMPRESSIONS TO DRIVETO WEBSITES.RELEVANCY TO DRIVETO IMMEDIATE OFFERSIN STORE.REVENUE.
  • 62. CONSUMERS WANT:UTILITY. MAKE IT USEFULFOR ME.CONVENIENCE. MAKE ITEASY FOR ME TO USE.DEALS. GIVE ME VALUE.
  • 63. AIRMILES’ GENERALPHILOSOPHY:THINK BIG.START SMALL.SCALE FAST.
  • 64. THE EVENT ITSELF WAS A PLEASANTSURPRISE. GONE ARE THE DAYS OFRETAILERS AND MANUFACTURERSWONDERING WHEN TO TAKE THEDIGITAL AND SOCIAL LEAP. THE SENSEIN THE ROOM WAS THAT WE’VEALL STARTED TO TEST IDEAS ANDSTRATEGIES THAT ARE RELEVANT TOOUR BUSINESS AND MARKETINGOBJECTIVES. TRADITIONAL PRINT ANDFULFILLMENT VENDORS ALL OFFERSOCIAL/MOBILE DISTRIBUTION.AND CONTENT CREATORS ARE TALK-ING ABOUT HOW TO SELL A RETAILER’SPRODUCT ACROSS ONLINE ANDOFFLINE TOUCHPOINTS.
  • 65. BUT THE REAL STRUGGLE NOW ISHOW DO WE STAY ONE STEP AHEADOF OUR SHOPPERS AND CUSTOM-ERS? HOW DO WE GIVE THEM WHATTHEY WANT, WHEN THEY WANTIT? AND HOW DO WE FIND THE RE-SOURCES – BOTH TIME AND MON-EY – TO DO THIS WELL AND IN ADDI-TION TO TRADITIONAL MARKETINGAND ADVERTISING.WE’RE LOOKING FORWARD TO SEE-ING HOW THIS YEAR CHANGES THECANADIAN RETAIL LANDSCAPE ANDARE ANTICIPATING A YEAR OF IN-NOVATION, SOME RISK TAKING ANDA LOT OF SUCCESS STORIES.
  • 66. 167 KING STREET EAST, SECOND FLOORTORONTO, ONTARIO, M5A 1J4416.365.0460www.mars-philter.ca