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  • We’ve been celebrating all year. The governor proclaimed March 1 Cooperative extension Day statewide.I missed the party at the capitol, but we will have other opportunities to celebrate. Look for more celebration at events through the year, such as the June Dairy Breakfast, The Wisconsin Valley Fair.
  • Cooperative Extension’s history is the history of men, women and families. It is woven into the fabric of American history -- and the pivotal events – that shape our world.Agricultural Extension work began in the nation and in Wisconsin between 1908 and 1914.In 1911, the Wisconsin legislature provided funds for counties to jointly employ with the University of Wisconsin College of Agriculture “an agriculturist who is an agent of a restricted area, a county or a part of one," with expenses to be shared on a 50/50 basis. The Oneida County Board had The first county to take advantage of this new arrangement voted on Nov. 11, 1911, to request an agricultural representative in the county. The county hired E.L. Luther in February 12, 1912 as a county agricultural representative with headquarters in Rhinelander. He serviced in Oneida County and made his rounds riding a two-cylinder Indian motorcylce.
  • Correct answer: 3. Oneida County --- The county board voted Nov. 11, 1911, to request an agent.
  • Correct answer: 3. Oneida County --- The county board voted Nov. 11, 1911, to request an agent.
  • By the end of 1912, more than a dozen counties had agricultural representatives. In 1912, the cost to taxpayers in a county that retained an agricultural representative was between $1,000 and $1,300 a year. Demonstration plots were popular, and the Wisconsin Potato Train was an innovative way to take new information to the people.
  • Correct Answer: 6. A state of the art winter transporter was a Model T Ford, with chains that ran in a continuous circle around the back and front tires!
  • Correct Answer: 6. A state of the art winter transporter was a Model T Ford, with chains that ran in a continuous circle around the back and front tires!
  • The years of development for Cooperative Extension were between 1914, the beginning of World War 1, and 1930, leading up to the Great Depression.Cooperative Extension often held join programs with the branch experiment stations. This picture represents such a meeting, which took place in Marshfield in about 1917.During World War I, the College of Agriculture placed 27 war emergency demonstration agents in counties to help stimulate food and livestock production.Click throughThe emergency agents pushed Wisconsin farmers to plant more and harvest more.
  • Post World War I farmers began to see hard times, as increased production for the war created more produce than markets could handle after the war ended.Cooperative Extension agents shifted from how to produce more to how to produce more economically.Early county agricultural agents also helped farmers with practical problems such as calibrating a grain drill, pictured here.
  • True. The Wisconsin assembly passed a bill that established the Agriculture Experiment Station on March 27, 1883. #2 TRICK QUESTION!We have an ag research station right here in Marathon county located just off hwy 97 between Stratford and Marshfield.
  • True. The Wisconsin assembly passed a bill that established the Agriculture Experiment Station on March 27, 1883. #2 TRICK QUESTION!We have an ag research station right here in Marathon county located just off hwy 97 between Stratford and Marshfield.
  • With the crash of the stock market in 1929, Rural Wisconsin suffered along with everyone else. Cooperative Extension agents spent many hours working at county fairs, dairy shows and other events that brought people together during the Great Depression.
  • Extension agents also worked with the CCC. Forestry programs were promoted and often supervised by coop extension agents. These men are planting trees in 1936. ------------------------------By 1930, most Wisconsin counties had employed Cooperative Extension agents, but little did these agents know the tough times they would face during the Great Depression. Farmers suffered along with everyone else in the country, although those who could keep their farms always had something to eat and a roof over their heads. In the early years of the Depression, Extension worked to help farmers improve the quality and quantity of dairy products and crops. During Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s “New Deal,” forestry programs were promoted and often supervised by Extension agents, when thousands of trees were planted in Wisconsin when reforestation had become an Extension goal.The CCC, authorized in 1933, put thousands of single young men ages 18 to 25 to work for $30 per month. Twelve CCC camps operated in Wisconsin’s national forests, 12 in state forests and eight in state parks. Forestry programs were promoted and often supervised by Cooperative Extension agents, especially during the Depression years, when thousands of trees were planted. Pictured are men planting trees by hand, around 1936.
  • Home economics was a very important issuefor Cooperative Extension educators during the challenging times during the Great Depression and before World War II.What are these people doing?Mattress making was an important homemaker project, as pictured here in 1939.
  • Correct answer: 4. Marathon County. Mary Brady was the first county home agent to be paid with federal, state and county funds. She was hired January 1917. Milwaukee County became the second county to employ a permanent home agent in 1928, followed by Wood County in 1929, Winnebago in 1932 and Sheboygan in 1933.
  • Correct answer: 4. Marathon County. Mary Brady was the first county home agent to be paid with federal, state and county funds. She was hired January 1917. Milwaukee County became the second county to employ a permanent home agent in 1928, followed by Wood County in 1929, Winnebago in 1932 and Sheboygan in 1933.
  • Correct answer: 2. corn. Young People’s Corn Contests served as one of the forerunners of the 4-H Club programs.
  • Correct answer: 2. corn. Young People’s Corn Contests served as one of the forerunners of the 4-H Club programs.
  • Another important campus connection….The College of Agriculture and Cooperative Extension have been national leaders in the development and promotion of new alfalfa varieties, and of management practices that resulted in higher yields. This picture was taken in Wood County in 1949.
  • Cooperative Extension embarked on new directions from 1960 to 1975. One such new initiative was the expanded food and nutrition program. One of the first programs in Wisconsin was in Jackson County. This program reaches out to low-income persons.
  • Broad changes occurred within Cooperative Extension between 1975 and 1990.There were additions and expansions to family living programs, 4-H youth development programs and community development. During this time, community development educators began to work on economic development and comprehensive land use plans.
  • Correct answer: 4. 68. We respond to the diverse needs and resources of low income populations by implementing community-based nutrition education programs. Last year, our educators made more than 400,000 educational contacts providing nutrition education to youth, families and seniors.
  • Correct answer: 4. 68. We respond to the diverse needs and resources of low income populations by implementing community-based nutrition education programs. Last year, our educators made more than 400,000 educational contacts providing nutrition education to youth, families and seniors.
  • THE LAST CENTURYended with profound changes within Cooperative Extension in Wisconsin.From 1990 to 2000, Cooperative Extension made greater attempts to reach out to the underserved, tribal nations and urban audiences.Pictured here is the Rock County youth development summer enrichment program.
  • TODAY, …Cooperative Extension has offices in each of our state’s 72 counties.…Offers educational programs in four areas:Agriculture and Natural Resources4-H Youth DevelopmentCommunity, Natural Resources and Economic DevelopmentFamily Living Programs…Works with county government and three tribes, state and federal agencies.…Makes close to 1 million educational contacts each year.…And is reaching rural and urban audiences, continues to offer traditional educational services, and is working hard to reach new audiences.One such new audience are the Hmong. theUnited Community Hmong Center in Green Bay to learn about that the Brown County UW-Extension Office received a USDA Food Security Grant which helped the Hmong community update their commercial kitchen and provide for cold storage at the United Community Hmong Center in Green Bay. 
  • Dairy profitabilityCooperative Extension educators work hard to keep Wisconsin’s $20.6 billion dairy industry profitable and competitive, which is critical to economic development in the state. Cooperative Extension Dairy Team provides research-based advice about modernization options and management practices to approximately 300 dairy farmers annually. A 2008 sample survey of 99 farmers receiving modernization assistance from UW-Extension Cooperative Extension showed a total annual milk income increase of $45.3 million and an average labor reduction of 2,436 hours per farm each year.
  • Correct answer: 5. All of the above and MORE! CNRED educators offer downtown revitalization, work to help communities create a healthier economy, work to protect our lakes and rivers, work with forestry issues, work on urban and regional planning, and the list goes on and on….
  • Correct answer: 5. All of the above and MORE! CNRED educators offer downtown revitalization, work to help communities create a healthier economy, work to protect our lakes and rivers, work with forestry issues, work on urban and regional planning, and the list goes on and on….
  • Natural Resource Education within the Community, Natural resource and Economic Development program area can look like a web-based series of workshops. One that has been popular lately is the Learn About Your Land series, in which landowners learn to understand, manage and get the best use from their property.
  • Local government education may include session concerning long range planning for our local units of government, such as the work that started my time here in Marathon County, as comprehensive planning was going on in towns, villages and cities, as well as the county.
  • Operation Military Kids4-H is teaming up with community and military partners in Wisconsin to offer Operation Military Kids (OMK), a nationwide initiative that supports the children and families of U.S. military personnel during and after the deployment of a loved one. Operation Military Kids programs have reached 11,922 total participants and 4,088 youth program participants.
  • Here is one of our volunteers in action. Katy is a professional  photographer, who volunteered her time to  work with 4 H  students  and  parents. Some of the cameras   and all of  the  notebook computers were partof the broadband  mobile lab.    
  • Correct answer: 3. 63, 200 that is roughly 5268 per month. If we estimate, conservatively, at $10 per hour, that is a financial contribution of $632,00 that was made in 2010.
  • Correct answer: 3. 63, 200 that is roughly 5268 per month. If we estimate, conservatively, at $10 per hour, that is a financial contribution of $632,00 that was made in 2010.
  • Trained Dairy WorkersHispanic dairy workers are a growing and important part of our state’s agriculture economy.The Cooperative Extension Dairy Team created an award-winning curriculum and program for Hispanic Dairy Workers.
  • Correct answer: 3. 4,000. Over 4,000 youth, both 4-H members and non-members, participating in 4-H STEM activities around the state. This includes activities and programs like 4-H Gateway Academies, robotics, 4-H Tech Wizards and Power of Wind. Cooperative Extension 4-H Youth Development STEM programs prepare youth for future technical careers by letting them experience success with concepts in engineering and scientific thought.
  • Correct answer: 3. 4,000. Over 4,000 youth, both 4-H members and non-members, participating in 4-H STEM activities around the state. This includes activities and programs like 4-H Gateway Academies, robotics, 4-H Tech Wizards and Power of Wind. Cooperative Extension 4-H Youth Development STEM programs prepare youth for future technical careers by letting them experience success with concepts in engineering and scientific thought.
  • Educated Youth4-H is a community of young people across America who are learning leadership, citizenship and life skills.4-H is using this network in Wisconsin to help youth build their science, engineering and technology skills through 4-H STEM activities to provide opportunities for hands-on scientific learning and discovery in 4-H clubsMany activities will be held again this summer for youth throughout the state.
  • Correct answer: 4. 1041 and 416 adult volunteers received training and resources from UW-Extension to help them in their roles of club organizational leaders, project leaders, activity leaders and resource leaders to supplement the work of the UW-Extension professional staff. The typical 4-H volunteer contributes nearly 8 hours per month.
  • Correct answer: 4. 1041 and 416 adult volunteers received training and resources from UW-Extension to help them in their roles of club organizational leaders, project leaders, activity leaders and resource leaders to supplement the work of the UW-Extension professional staff. The typical 4-H volunteer contributes nearly 8 hours per month.
  • Viable neighborhoods, strong familiesOur Family Living Program area focuses on economic development, one family at a time. Cooperative Extension educators help create strong families that serve as the foundation for community life by enhancing family relationships, parenting, child development and the community institutions that promote family well-being. Our food and nutrition education promote healthy, well-nourished families as they learn to manage food dollars, plan nutritious meals, and purchase, prepare, and serve food that is safe to eat.Our FLP educators help families meet future needs while keeping pace with day-to-day expenses and addressing the basics of earning, spending, saving, investing, and housing issues.
  • Because of YOU, thanks, thanks, thanks, and more thanks… to next slide…

Centennial marathon countyboardonline-with-answers Centennial marathon countyboardonline-with-answers Presentation Transcript

  • Centennial Celebration 2012:100 years of working for Wisconsin Mary Kluz Marathon County UW-Extension Cooperative Extension University of Wisconsin-Extension
  • Thank you for 100 years! Cooperative Extension began in counties Partnership remains strong – because of YOU and our ability to meet the educational needs of your county. We appreciate your support and partnership!
  • 2012 is our Centennial Celebration Celebration is important Great time to focus on/build awareness for our future Events will help us raise awareness; look for our materials at related events like the June Dairy Breakfast, the Wisconsin Valley Fair Centennial will be part of Wisconsin Associated County Extension Committees (WACEC) 2012 conference  Event at Lambeau Field – Sunday, June 24, 6:30-8:30 p.m.  Co-sponsored by WACEC
  • Cooperative Extension’s history is woven into the fabric ofAmerican history. The first county agricultural representative washired in February 1912 and was headquartered in Rhinelander.E.L. Luther made his rounds on a two-cylinder Indian motorcycle.
  • The first Cooperative Extension agent washired in what County?1. Barron2. Vernon3. Oneida4. Dane
  • The first Cooperative Extension agent washired in what County?1. Barron2. Vernon3. Oneida - CORRECT Oneida County4. Dane The County Board voted November 11, 1911, to request an agent.
  • “He circuit-drove a horse and buggy or a dusty old Ford, loaded to the gunwales.Somehow he tucked in and toted soil augers and soil samples, wire seed cornracks, packets of litmus paper, rag-doll seed germination rolls, dairy barn recordsheets, caustic potash and nippers for calf and cow dehorning. And in collegebulletins, bundled up with binder twine, the Extension worker carried handyplans for bull pens, milk houses, and split-log road drags.”That was Elwood McIntyre writing about the first 50 years of CooperativeExtension.“these men peddled progress”
  • But it wasn’t just men peddling progress. While ag agents workedthe fields with farmers, women “home” agents helped farm wiveskeep the family together.
  • By the end of 1912, more than a dozen counties had agriculturalrepresentatives.In 1912, the cost to taxpayers in a county that retained an agriculturalrepresentative was between $1,000 and $1,300 a year.The Wisconsin Potato Train was an innovative way to take new information tothe people.
  • Our first extension agents traveled by1. Train2. Tin Lizzies3. Horse and buggy4. Motorbike5. Bobsled6. None of the above7. All of the above
  • Our first extension agents traveled by1. Train2. Tin Lizzies3. Horse and buggy4. Motorbike5. Bobsled A state of the art winter6. None of the above transporter was a Model T7. All of the above Ford, with chains that ran in a continuous circle around the back and front tires!
  • Cooperative Extension often held join programs with the branchexperiment stations. This picture represents such a meeting,which took place in Marshfield in about 1917.During World War I, the College of Agriculture placed 27 waremergency demonstration agents in counties to help stimulatefood and livestock production.
  • The emergency agents pushed Wisconsin farmers toplant more and harvest more.
  • Post World War I ,increased production for the war created moreproduce than markets could handle after the war ended. CooperativeExtension agents shifted from how to produce more to how to producemore economically.Early county agricultural agents also helped farmers with practicalproblems such as calibrating a grain drill, pictured here.
  • Cooperative Extension has a long historyworking with Agriculture ExperimentStations, which are older than extension.1. True2. FalseThe closest Agriculture Experiment Stationto Marathon County is:1. Hancock Ag Research Station2. Rhinelander Ag Research Station3. Kemp Natural Resources Station (Woodruff)
  • Cooperative Extension has a long historyworking with Agriculture ExperimentStations, which are older than extension.1. True The Wisconsin assembly passed a bill that established the Agriculture2. False Experiment Station on March 27, 1883The closest Agriculture Experiment Stationto Marathon County is:1. Hancock Ag Research Station TRICK QUESTION!2. Rhinelander Ag Research Station right We have an ag research station3. here in Marathon county located just Kemp Natural Resources Station off hwy 97 between Stratford and (Woodruff) Marshfield.
  • For all these years, Cooperative extension also has a closerelationship with campus based faculty. An example, researchdone on campus on conserving food and clothing was, and still is,disseminated by county agents to homemakers across the state.
  • With the crash of the stock market in 1929, Rural Wisconsinsuffered along with everyone else. Cooperative Extension agentsspent many hours working at county fairs, dairy shows and otherevents that brought people together during the Great Depression.
  • Extension agents also worked with the CCC. Forestry programswere promoted and often supervised by coop extension agents.These men are planting trees in 1936.
  • Home economics was a very important issue for Cooperative Extensioneducators during the challenging times during the Great Depression andbefore World War II.What are these people doing? Mattress making was an importanthomemaker project, as pictured here in 1939.
  • In the years leading up toWorld War II, Extensionshowed its mettle.By 1945 Wisconsin hadmore dairy cows thanany other state. Itproduced more milk andmore cheese. To improvemilk quality, Extensionencouraged farmers tobuild milk houses.
  • In 1941, when the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture called onWisconsin farmers to double their dairy production, farmers – andExtension workers – responded almost overnight withsuperhuman efforts, boosting milk production by 9 percent andgrowing emergency crops such as flax.
  • “Home agents” helped families stretchresources during the Great Depression, likeour Family Living educators do today. Thefirst home agent was hired in:1. Milwaukee County2. Wood County3. Winnebago County4. Marathon County5. Sheboygan County
  • “Home agents” helped families stretchresources during the Great Depression, likeour Family Living educators do today. Thefirst home agent was hired in:1. Milwaukee County Mary Brady was the first2. Wood County county home agent to be paid with federal, state and county3. Winnebago County funds. She was hired January4. Marathon County 1917. Milwaukee County became the second county to5. Sheboygan County employ a permanent home agent in 1928, followed by Wood County in 1929, Winnebago in 1932 and Sheboygan in 1933.
  • In the 1930s, Extension helped bring electric power to Wisconsinand succeeded in getting rural families to adopt this life-changingtechnology on a widespread basis. Not unlike today, as we teachpeople about how the new technology of the internet andconnecting with the rest of the world through broadbandconnection improves their lives.
  • Campus-based specialists and county agents offered crucialtechnical know-how. But they did much more than serve asimpartial educators. As an integral part of Wisconsin communities,they worked with families, farms and individuals, serving as aliaison between power providers and users, helping bring aboutchange .
  • In the midst of World War II, 4-H -- active in Wisconsin since 1915– continued to flourish.In 1945 Wisconsin’s 4-H enrollment exceeded 30,000 members.
  • Another important campus connection … The College ofAgriculture and Cooperative Extension have been national leadersin the development and promotion of new alfalfa varieties, and ofmanagement practices that resulted in higher yields. This picturewas taken in Wood County in 1949.
  • Cooperative Extension embarked on new directions from 1960 to1975.One such new initiative was the expanded food and nutritionprogram. One of the first programs in Wisconsin was in JacksonCounty.
  • Broad changes occurred within Cooperative Extension between1975 and 1990.There were additions and expansions to family living programs, 4-H youth development programs and community development.During this time, community development educators began towork on economic development and comprehensive land useplans.
  • The Expanded Food and Nutrition Programbegan in 1968. How many counties nowoffer nutrition education programming?1. 222. 463. 594. 68
  • The Expanded Food and Nutrition Programbegan in 1968. How many counties nowoffer nutrition education programming?1. 22 We respond to the diverse2. 46 needs and resources of low3. 59 income populations by implementing community-based4. 68 - CORRECT nutrition education programs. Last year, our educators made more than 400,000 educational contacts providing nutrition education to youth, families and seniors.
  • The last century ended with profound changes within CooperativeExtension in Wisconsin, as Cooperative Extension made greaterattempts to reach out to the underserved, tribal nations and urbanaudiences.Pictured here is the Rock County youth development summerenrichment program.
  • TODAY, …Cooperative Extension has offices in each of our state’s 72counties.Works with county government and three tribes, state and federalagencies.Makes close to 1 million educational contacts each year.And is reaching rural and urban audiences, continues to offer traditionaleducational services, and is working hard to reach new audiences.
  • Cooperative Extension educators work hard to keep Wisconsin’s$20.6 billion dairy industry profitable and competitive. A 2008sample survey of 99 farmers receiving modernization assistancefrom UW-Extension Cooperative Extension showed a total annualmilk income increase of $45.3 million and an average laborreduction of 2,436 hours per farm each year.
  • “CNRED” educators began appearing inWisconsin in the 1950s. Today theseeducators offer programming in:1. Economic development2. Local government education3. Water quality4. Natural resources5. All of the above6. None of the above
  • “CNRED” educators began appearing inWisconsin in the 1950s. Today theseeducators offer programming in:1. Economic development2. Local government And MORE! CNRED education educators offer downtown revitalization, work to help3. Water quality communities create a4. Natural resources healthier economy, work to protect our lakes and rivers,5. All of the above work with forestry issues, work on urban and regional6. None of the above planning, and the list goes on and on…
  • Natural Resource Education within the Community, Naturalresource and Economic Development program area can look likea web-based series of workshops. One that has been popularlately is the Learn About Your Land series, in which landownerslearn to understand, manage and get the best use from their
  • Local government education may include session concerning longrange planning for our local units of government, such as the workthat started my time here in Marathon County, as comprehensiveplanning was going on in towns, villages and cities, as well as thecounty.
  • 4-H is teaming up with community and military partners inWisconsin to offer Operation Military Kids (OMK), a nationwideinitiative that supports the children and families of U.S. militarypersonnel during and after the deployment of a loved one.
  • Here is one of our volunteers in action. Katy is a professionalphotographer, who volunteered her time to work with 4-H studentsand parents. Some of the cameras and all of the notebookcomputers were part of the broadband mobile lab.
  • How many volunteer hours did volunteersassociated with Marathon County UW-Extension contribute in 2010 to supporteducational programming?1. 45002. 27,6003. 63,200
  • How many volunteer hours did volunteersassociated with Marathon County UW-Extension contribute in 2010 to supporteducational programming?1. 45002. 27,6003. 63,200 - CORRECT 5,268 per month. If we estimate, That is roughly conservatively, at $10 per hour, that is a financial contribution of $632,000 that was made in 2010.
  • Hispanic dairy workers are a growing and important part of ourstate’s agriculture economy.The Cooperative Extension Dairy Team created an award-winningcurriculum and program for Hispanic Dairy Workers.
  • 4-H offers opportunities for youth to explorescience, technology, engineering and math(STEM) through workshops and camps. Howmany youth were involved statewide lastyear:1. 3602. 2,4703. 4,0004. 5,600
  • 4-H offers opportunities for youth to explorescience, technology, engineering and math(STEM) through workshops and camps. Howmany youth were involved statewide lastyear:1. 360 Over 4,000 youth, both 4-H members and non-members, participating in 4-H2. 2,470 STEM activities around the state. This includes activities and programs like 4-3. 4,000 - CORRECT H Gateway Academies, robotics, 4-H Tech Wizards and Power of Wind.4. 5,600 Cooperative Extension 4-H Youth Development STEM programs prepare youth for future technical careers by letting them experience success with concepts in engineering and scientific thought.
  • 4-H is using this network in Wisconsin to help youth build theirscience, engineering and technology skills through 4-H STEMactivities to provide opportunities for hands-on scientific learningand discovery in 4-H clubs
  • How many youth were involved in 4-Hin Marathon County in 2010:1. 1902. 3623. 8564. 1041
  • How many youth were involved in 4-Hin Marathon County in 2010:1. 1902. 3623. 8564. 1041 – CORRECT 1041 and 416 adult volunteers received training and resources from UW-Extension to help them in their roles of club organizational leaders, project leaders, activity leaders and resource leaders to supplement the work of the UW-Extension professional staff. The typical 4-H volunteer contributes nearly 8 hours per month.
  • Our Family Living Program area focuses on economicdevelopment, one family at a time.Cooperative Extension educators help create strong families thatserve as the foundation for community life by enhancing familyrelationships, parenting, child development and the communityinstitutions that promote family well-being.
  • Cooperative Extension programming will behere another 100 years, because we willcontinue to be a thriving, well-known andsought-out educational resource thatreflects the rich diversity of the state.1. True2. Absolutely, without doubt, True!
  • Thank you! For partnering with us for 100 years.YOU make this centennial possible.