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Wind Power Market: Turbine Components & Subcomponents and Demand in the U.S. and the World, The

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  • 1. Get more info on this report!The Wind Power Market: Turbine Components & Subcomponents andDemand in the U.S. and the WorldJanuary 1, 2009Companies involved in the manufacturing and distribution of products related to windenergy are anticipating a banner year for 2009 as a new base of customers inherit thewind as their primary source of energy. But some manufacturers with an eye towardsexpanding market presence in the U.S. are waiting with baited breath. By early 2009,the U.S. will have inaugurated President Barack Obama who will be consumed withhealing the nation from an economy in shambles. His actions could have a ripple effecton the spending intentions of businesses and consumers who are consideringconverting to renewable energy sources as a means to cut energy costs and helppromote environmental reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Obama said he wouldinvest $15 billion a year in renewable energy sources to create five million new energyjobs through 2018. He also stated that he would emphasize a program to spend $150billion over 10 years to develop renewable energy sources, like wind, and to encourageenergy conservation.SBI estimates that the total wind energy market in the U.S. is valued at $151.3 billion.The U.S. wind industry expanded rapidly in 2008 fueled by three key market drivers: Skyrocketing fossil fuel and oil prices for commercial and home heating Long-term demand for renewable energy sources domestically Improvements in technology that streamlines the manufacturing of wind turbines, especially for larger machines required for offshore wind farm initiatives Positive employment outlook in turbine manufacturing sectorScope and MethodologyThis report includes both primary and secondary research. Secondary research datahave been obtained from government sources, trade association publications, businessjournals, and company literature. Statistical data are included for industry revenue, bothglobally and for the United States. Historical data are provided for the 2002 to 2008 timeframe with projections of future sales through 2013. The base year for the report is2008.The report covers shipments, imports and exports, as well as the economic and market
  • 2. trends driving the wind power industry. It identifies key market trends and dynamics,and profiles major market players, outlining their strategies to maximize growth andprofitability.SBI’s research methodology for this report involved aggregating, synthesizing, andanalyzing data from several sources, including the U.S. government and several third-party market research syndicated data suppliers. Historical data relating to themanufacturing and distribution of wind energy products in the U.S are culled from theU.S. Department of Commerce, the U.S. Census Bureau, and the Bureau of LaborStatistics. Analysis of these data, including market-level shipments, imports and exportsprovide the foundation for our projections of overall market size and growth during thenext five years. Our projections also take into account data that indirectly affects thegrowth of the wind energy market, such as information provided by the U.S. Departmentof Energy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the American Wind EnergyAssociation.The shipment value has been used to indicate the market supply of wind energyproducts, specifically products manufactured to develop wind energy turbines. Shipmentstatistics are derived from the U.S. Census of Manufacturers and the Annual Survey ofManufacturers, and are estimated and projected by SBI.How You Will Benefit from this ReportThis report is a “must read” for manufacturers of wind energy turbines and itsassociated components, such as gearboxes, measuring devices, towers, nacelles, andblades. These companies will understand the current market size of wind energyinstallations globally and the U.S.’s position among other nations. The report examinesthe states with the greatest domestic opportunities for wind energy expansion and looksat the growth potential for manufacturers of large-scale and small turbines for theconsumer market. Manufacturers will find the report provides a thorough analysis ofwind energy manufacturing and how companies are marketing their products tocompete with other more popular energy sources.This report will help: Marketing Managers identify market opportunities and develop promotion plans for wind energy products Research and Development Professionals keep abreast of competitor initiatives, and product innovations Advertising and Public Relations Agencies working with clients in the wind energy sector to create targeted and compelling messages about the benefits of wind energy products Business Development Executives of wind energy companies to identify potential partnerships, and detect new product applications.
  • 3. Additional InformationMarket Insights: A Selection From The ReportChina and Spain are Global Leaders in Wind PowerMore than 40 companies are now vying for market share in the burgeoning Asian windturbine manufacturing industry. Most Asian nations have used European or U.S.technology as the basis for their turbine architecture but their dependence on non-Asianmanufacturers is rapidly dwindling, especially in China, which added 3,300 MW of windenergy capacity in 2007, representing a growth of 145% over 2006. In 2007, the top twoChinese companies, Gold Wind and Sinovel, accounted for 1,460 MW of the newinstalled capacity, representing 42 percent of the annual market. The ChineseRenewable Energy Industry Association forecasts a capacity nearing 50,000 MW by2015 and the regions with the greatest use of wind power will be mainly along theSoutheast coast and Inner Mongolia.Offshore Wind Energy Efforts Blow StrongThe global move to offshore wind farm development is enabling nations to acceleratewind energy adoption while reducing reliance on land-based power grids. Offshore windturbines are subjected to fiercer winds and require larger turbines than land-based windinitiatives. But these benefits typically can increase the overall cost of offshoremanufacturing and maintenance of wind turbines. Capital costs are approximately 30-50percent higher than onshore, due to larger machine size and the costs of transportingand installing at sea. These expenses are partially offset by higher energy yields by asmuch as 30percent. But many countries are finding the benefits to offshore outweighthese added expenditures. Offshore wind energy, experts tell SBI, has a reduced effecton the environment and higher wind speeds at sea result in increased energyproduction.TABLE OF CONTENTSChapter 1: Executive Summary Table 1-1: Growth of Wind Energy Installations in U.S. States, 2007 to 2009 (percent) U.S. Will Surpass Germany as Global Wind Energy Leader China and Spain are global leaders in wind power Table 1-2: Installed Wind Power Capacity (in Megawatts) in Asia, 2006 to 2008 (percent) Germany is Leading Wind Energy Market in Europe
  • 4. Spain Adopts Wind Farm Legislation SBI Estimates 2008 is Banner Year for Netherlands, Sweden Table 1-3: Growth of Wind Power Installations in Europe, 2002 to 2008 (percent) India Is Asian Market Leader Offshore Wind Energy Efforts Blow Strong U.S. Grows Interest in Offshore Wind Energy Manufacturing of Wind Turbine Components Imports and Exports of Wind Turbine Components Shipment Value of Wind Turbine Components Table 1-4: Total U.S. Shipments of Wind Turbine Subcomponents, 2002 to 2005 (in millions of dollars) Table 1-5: Total U.S. Shipments of Wind Turbine Subcomponents, 2006 to 2008 (in millions of dollars) Table 1-6: Share of U.S. Shipment Value of Wind Turbine Subcomponents, 2002 and 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent) Table 1-7: U.S. Domestic Imports of Wind Turbine Subcomponents, 2002 to 2008 (in millions of dollars) Table 1-8: Share of U.S. Domestic Imports of Wind Turbine Subcomponents, 2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent) Table 1-9: Growth of U.S. Domestic Exports of Wind Turbine Subcomponents, 2002 to 2008 (in millions of dollars) Table 1-10: Share of U.S. Domestic Exports of Wind Turbine Subcomponents, 2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent) Table 1-11: Total Market Value of U.S. Wind Turbine Manufacturing, 2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent) Strong Potential for U.S. Wind Energy Manufacturing Employment Outlook Table 1-12: Percent Distribution of Employment and Establishments in Machinery Manufacturing by Sector, 2006 Overall Wind Energy Employment Outlook Public Relations Woes for Wind Energy Wind Turbine Product Innovation Small-scale Turbine Development Wind Energy Market to reach $180.1B by 2013 Table 1-13: Forecast of U.S. Shipment Values of Turbine Manufactured Subcomponents, 2009 to 2013 (in millions of dollars and percent)Chapter 2: World Wind Energy Market Report Scope Methodology The Global Market China and Spain are global leaders in wind power Table 2-1: Global Increase in Wind Energy Capacity (in Megawatts), 2005 to 2006 (percent) Table 2-2: Share of Total Installed Wind Energy Capacity (in Megawatts), 2006 to 2008 (percent)
  • 5. Table 2-3: Installed Wind Power Capacity (in Megawatts) in Asia, 2006 to 2008 (percent) India Is Asian Market Leader Spain and Germany Lead Other European Nations in Wind Capacity Installed Table 2-4: Top 10 New Global Wind Installation Capacities (in Megawatts), 2007 to 2008 (percent) Figure 2-1: Percent of Total New Installed Wind Energy Capacity, 2008, by Country Table 2-5: Germany, Spain and Denmark’s New Wind Energy Installation, 2002 to 2007 Figure 2-2: Germany, Spain and Denmark Share of EU Wind Capacity Installation (percent) Germany Employs 70,000 in Wind Energy Industry Spain Adopts Wind Farm Legislation SBI Estimates 2008 is Banner Year for Netherlands, Sweden Table 2-6: Growth of Wind Power Installations in Europe, 2002 to 2008 (percent) Offshore Wind Energy Efforts Blow Strong Figure 2-3: Percent of Total Offshore Wind Energy Capacity Installed in 2007 Table 2-7: Total European Offshore Wind Power Installations, 2007 U.S. Grows Interest in Offshore Wind EnergyChapter 3: The U.S. Market Size and Scope The U.S. Market Continues to Boom Wind Energy by State Table 3-1: Top States with Cumulative Wind Power Capacity (in Megawatts), 2007 to 2008 (percent) Table 3-2: Top States with Newly Installed Wind Power Capacity (in Megawatts), 2007 (percent) Table 3-3: Total Utility Wind Power Rankings, 2007 (percent) Table 3-4: Growth of Wind Energy Installations in U.S. States, 2007 and 2009 (percent) Federal Production Tax Credit Spurs Wind Energy Market Growth U.S. Will Surpass Germany as Global Wind Energy Leader Table 3-5: Annual Turbine Installations by Manufacturer, 2005 to 2008 (percent) Table 3-6: Renewable Electricity Net Generation by Energy Source and Census Division, 2006 (millions of kilowatt hours and percent) Wind Turbine Components Table 3-7: Turbine Component Weights and Costs (percent) Parts of a Wind Turbine Description of Tower, Rotor and Hub Components Manufacturing of Wind Turbine Components Table 3-8: NAICS Codes and Descriptions of Wind Turbine Components . Table 3-9: NAICS Codes and Descriptions of Wind Turbine Subcomponents Caveat to Using the 6-digit NAICS Codes Imports and Exports of Wind Turbine Components Shipment Value of Wind Turbine Components
  • 6. Table 3-10: Total U.S. Shipments of Wind Turbine Subcomponents, 2002 to2005 (in millions of dollars)Table 3-11: Total U.S. Shipments of Wind Turbine Subcomponents, 2006 to2008 (in millions of dollars)Table 3-12: Share of U.S. Shipment Value of Wind Turbine Subcomponents,2002 and 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)Table 3-13: U.S. Domestic Imports of Wind Turbine Subcomponents, 2002 to2008 (in millions of dollars)Table 3-14: Share of U.S. Domestic Imports of Wind Turbine Subcomponents,2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)Table 3-15: Growth of U.S. Domestic Exports of Wind Turbine Subcomponents,2002 to 2008 (in millions of dollars)Table 3-16: Share of U.S. Domestic Exports of Wind Turbine Subcomponents,2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)Table 3-17: Total Market Value of U.S. Wind Turbine Manufacturing, 2002 vs.2008 (in millions of dollars)Figure 3-1: Imports and Exports of Wind Turbine Products as a Percent of theTotal Market (percent)Iron Foundries Imports Valued at $877MTable 3-18: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Imports of Iron Foundries, 2002 vs.2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)Table 3-19: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Exports of Iron Foundries, 2002 vs.2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)Canada is Largest Importer and Exporter of Fabricated Structural MetalsTable 3-20: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Imports of Fabricated StructuralMetals, 2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)Table 3-21: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Exports of Fabricated StructuralMetals, 2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)Figure 3-2: Share of Imports of Fabricated Structural Metals by Country, 2008(percent)Japan is Lead Exporter of Ball Bearings to U.S.Table 3-22: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Imports of Ball and Roller Bearings,2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)Table 3-23: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Exports of Ball and Roller Bearings,2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)China is Greatest Exporter of Fans and BlowersTable 3-24: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Imports of Industrial Fans andBlowers, 2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)Table 3-25: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Exports of Industrial Fans andBlowers, 2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)Import Sources are Widely Distributed for Turbines and Generator SetsTable 3-26: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Imports of Turbine and GeneratorSets, 2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)Table 3-27: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Exports of Turbine and GeneratorSets, 2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent)
  • 7. Figure 3-3: Share of Exports of Turbines and Generator Sets by Country, 2008 (percent) Source: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau, Stat-USA, USA Trade Online. Calculated and estimated by SBI Imports of Printed Circuit and Electronics Assemblies Decline Table 3-28: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Imports of Printed Circuit Assemblies, 2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent) Table 3-29: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Exports of Printed Circuit Assemblies, 2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent) Imports of Measuring Devices Worth $2.5B Table 3-30: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Imports of Measuring and Controlling Devices, 2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent) Table 3-31: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Exports of Measuring and Controlling Devices, 2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent) Mexico is Largest Exporter of Motors and Generators to the U.S Table 3-32: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Imports of Motors and Generators, 2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent) Table 3-33: Country Share of U.S. Domestic Exports of Motors and Generators, 2002 vs. 2008 (in millions of dollars and percent) Strong Potential for U.S. Wind Energy Manufacturing The Cost of Wind-Generated Electricity in the United States Figure 3-4: Producer Price Index Trend of Wind Turbine Parts Employment Outlook Table 3-34: Percent Distribution of Employment and Establishments in Machinery Manufacturing by Sector, 2006 Table 3-35: Number of Current and Projected U.S. Jobs in Turbine Manufacturing, 2006 and 2016 (percent) Table 3-36: Employment in machinery manufacturing by industry segment, 2006 and projected change, 2006-2016 (Employment in thousands) Table 3-37: Total U.S. Employees in Turbine Subcomponent Manufacturing, 2006 (percent) Table 3-38: Payroll and Number of Companies Involved in Turbine Manufacturing in the U.S., 2006 (in dollars and percent) Nature of the Work Overall Wind Energy Employment Outlook Wind Energy Market to reach $180.1B by 2013 Table 3-39: Forecast of U.S. Shipment Values of Turbine Manufactured Subcomponents, 2009 to 2013 (in millions of dollars) Figure 3-5: Market Value Trend of U.S. Wind Energy Manufacturing, 2009 to 2013 (in dollars and percent)Chapter 4: Competitive ProfilesGE Energy Figure 4-1: General Electric Co. Infrastructure Division Revenues and Year-Over- Year Growth, 2003 to 2008 (e) (in billions of dollars and percent) Table 4-1: General Electric Revenues, 2003 to 2008 (in billions of dollars and percent)
  • 8. Figure 4-2: Share of General Electric Revenue for 2008, by GE Business Unit (in billions of dollars and percent)Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Table 4-2: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Revenues, 2007 and 2008, by Division (in billions of dollars and percent)Siemens Power Generation Table 4-3: Siemens AG Revenues, 2007 to 2008 (e), by Business Unit (in billions of dollars and percent) Figure 4-3: Siemens AG Share of Revenue by Business Unit, 2006 to 2008 (e) (percent)Suzlon Energy Figure 4-4: Suzlon Energy Share of Revenues by Geographic Region, 2006 and 2008 (e) (percent)Gamesa Figure 4-5: Gamesa Revenues, 2003 to 2008 (e) (in billions of dollars and percent) Figure 4-6: Gamesa 2008 Share of Revenues by Geographic Region (percent) Figure 4-7: Gamesa 2008 Share of Revenues by Line of Business (percent)Vestas Figure 4-8: Vestas Revenues, 2003 to 2008 (e) (in billions of dollars) Emerging Wind Turbine ManufacturersChapter 5: Marketing and Product Innovation Blowing the Wind in the Right Direction Figure 5-1: U.S. Share of Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 2007 (percent) Table 5-1: Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2002-2008 (in Quadrillion BTUs and percent) Figure 5-2: Share of Consumption of Renewable BTU Energy in the U.S. by Source, 2002 and 2008 (percent) Figure 5-3: U.S. Share of All Renewable Energy Consumption by Source, 2008 (percent) Table 5-2: American Wind Energy Association 2007 and 2008 Lobbying Expenditures (in dollars) Public Relations Woes for Wind Energy AWEA Defends Wind Turbines Noise is Problem Placement of Turbines Near Military Bases Advanced Energy Initiative Promotes Wind Acceptance Wind Turbine Product Innovation Future Component Product Innovations Small-scale Turbine Development Other Small TurbinesChapter 6: The Consumer Market Consumer Market Growth Table 6-1: U.S. Market for Small Wind Turbines, 2001 to 2007 (in millions of dollars)
  • 9. Table 6-2: Projected Growth of the Small Wind Turbine Market, 2008 to 2013 (in millions of dollars) Barriers to Adoption of Small Wind Turbines Consumer Opportunities for Developers Consumer Perception of Wind Energy Consumers Prefer Competitive Electricity Markets Figure 6-1: Consumer Attitudes Toward Use of Different Energy Sources, 2007Available immediately for Online Download athttp://www.marketresearch.com/product/display.asp?productid=1836588US: 800.298.5699UK +44.207.256.3920Intl: +1.240.747.3093Fax: 240.747.3004

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