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  • 1. Get more info on this report!U.S. Solar Energy Market World Data, 2nd Edition: PV, Solar Thermal,CSPJune 1, 2010After its best year ever in 2008, the world solar market struggled to survive a tumultuous2009. What looked like a yawning drop for the photovoltaic (PV) market in the first halfof the year turned into a solid gain in total amount of systems installed on the strength ofstrong German sales in the fourth quarter. But despite annual worldwide PV installationsrising from 5.8 GW in 2008 to 6.6 GW in 2009, the PV market value dropped by 15.8%to $17.0 billion due to crashing PV cell and module prices.The U.S. fared better than most countries, with the PV market up an estimated 6.0% in2009 to $3.5 billion and PV installations rising to 469 MW. An extension of the solar taxcredit and new recovery act funding helped to keep the U.S. PV market on a continuingupward trend.The U.S. represented only 1% of a world solar thermal collector market dominated byChina in 2009, shipping 1.0 GW of collectors worth $79.6 million. While still currentlyfocused on low temperature pool heating systems that represented 82% of the U.S.market (by megawatts of collectors shipped) in 2009, SBI Energy anticipates muchstronger growth in residential hot water systems heading to 2014.Worldwide, the U.S. still has the greatest potential to increase its position in the solarmarket. SBI Energy foresees 900 MW of PV installations in 2010, rising to 7,600 MW ofPV installations in 2014 building on renewed interest in solar from utilities and theextension of the solar tax credit. While the ST market will show only moderate growth inthe U.S., the PV market segment will continue to shine in the U.S. and the concentratedsolar power (CSP) market is set to explode. SBI Energy estimates the U.S. solar panelmarket will reach $34.5 billion in 2014.U.S. Solar Energy Market World Data, 2nd Edition by SBI Energy analyzes themanufacturing and sales of the U.S. solar photovoltaic and solar thermal markets withinthe context of other key solar countries such as the Germany, Spain, Japan and China.The analysis will include definitions, current product offerings and market detail on thefollowing segments:
  • 2. Photovoltaic cells and modules Vacuum tube and flat-panel solar thermal modules Balance of system components including inverters, frames, batteries and charge controllersRead an excerpt from this report below.Report MethodologyThis report contains both primary and secondary data obtained from governmentsources, trade associations and publications, business journals, scientific papers,company literature, investment reports, and interviews with industry professionals.Statistics describing the production and sale of solar products in the U.S. are primarilythrough the U.S. Energy Information Administration. World solar product data comesfrom sources such as the International Energy Agency and the EurObserv’ERBarometer published by the EurObserv’ER consortiumWhat You’ll Get in This ReportU.S. Solar Energy Market World Data, 2nd Edition provides a concise, focused look onthe photovoltaic and solar thermal market as it exists today, and shows where themarket is moving over the next five years. The report highlights key players in theindustry and pinpoints ways that current and prospective competitors can capitalize onrecent trends and spearhead new ones. No other market research report provides boththe comprehensive analysis and extensive data that U.S. Solar Energy Market WorldData, 2nd Edition offers. Plus, you’ll benefit from extensive data, presented in easy-to-read and practical charts, tables and graphs.How You’ll Benefit from this ReportIf your company is already doing business related to solar electric power generation orsolar thermal heating technologies, or is considering making the leap, you will find thisreport invaluable as it provides a comprehensive package of information and insight notoffered in any other single source. You will gain a thorough understanding of the currentmarket for all aspects of electric vehicles, as well as projected markets and trendsthrough 2014.This report will help: Marketing managers identify market opportunities and develop targeted promotion plans for homeowners looking to invest in personal renewable energy options and who want to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Research and development professionals stay on top of competitor initiatives and explore demand for utility scale power generation and consumer scale PV and solar thermal applications. Advertising agencies working with clients in the banking, retail and power
  • 3. generation industries develop messages and images that compel homeowners, businesses and utilities migrate towards solar when looking at renewable energy options. Business development executives understand the dynamics of the market and identify possible partnerships. Information and research center librarians provide market researchers, brand and product managers and other colleagues with the vital information they need to do their jobs more effectively.Additional InformationMarket Insights: A Selection From The ReportU.S. Solar Thermal Shipment DemographicsUnlike the PV market in the U.S., the residential segment clearly dominates the solarthermal market, comprising 88.3% of domestic shipments in 2008 at 13.0 million squarefeet shipped. Pool heating systems have always been the best selling type of STsystem and accounted for 12.0 million square feet of shipments in 2008. The hot watersegment took 13.4% of shipments in 2008 at 2.0 million square feet, a 42.0% gain overthe 1.4 million square feet of shipments in 2007.The solar thermal market in the U.S. is not quite as regionally concentrated as the PVmarket, with the top ten states holding 86.1% of the ST market in 2008. The two topstates were Florida and California which took a combined 60.7% of ST shipments forthe year.Solar Production CostsDespite fluctuations, the overall trend has been a decline in medium and hightemperature ST collector prices from 2004 to 2008, with a CAGR of -1.0%. Lowtemperature collector prices, on the other hand, have shown a positive CAGR of 1.2%for the same period. SBI Energy expects these trends to continue as increased volumesof high temperature collectors reduces prices in that segment while the average pricefor low temperature collectors increases as manufacturers try to compensate for lowervolume shipments.In the News Six Clean Energy Markets That Will Change Life As We Know It in the Next Five Years
  • 4. New York, August 26, 2010 - Renewable energy is receiving a big push from theObama Administration and from governments around the globe. Stimulus packages andgovernment incentives for green technology has created jobs and established newindustry, which in turn has sparked a brighter outlook on the worlds economy. Goinginto 2011 and beyond, SBI Energy has identified six clean energies that will not onlygain double-digit growth in the next five years, but will also alter the lifestyle we knowtoday.Green Building Materials and Construction - Traditional construction createsconsiderable debris which ends up in our landfills, soil and fresh water supply.Furthermore, inefficient materials used in construction produce higher energy bills forthe homeowner. The judicious use of recycled materials, lumber that is harvested fromsustainable forests, more efficient insulation and windows, and improved constructiontechniques can drop energy bills for consumers while reducing the need for rawmaterials simultaneously. Market research performed by SBI Energy forecasts the sizeof the global green building materials market to grow to over $580 billion by 2015 fromabout $160 billion in 2010. This represents a growth rate of 21% CAGR which issignificant but understandable in light of increasing demand for products that saveenergy and minimize harmful environmental effects.Enhanced Oil Recovery - EOR refers to a variety of oil producing methods, by which70% - 90% more oil is produced from oil wells than is typically extracted by conventionaloil production methods. Some of the more common EOR methods include steam, gasor chemical injection, which improve the viscosity of the oil, enabling the oil to flow morefreely out of the well. More oil indicates lower prices. SBI Energy estimates dollars fromEOR will climb steadily with some gentle fluctuations. SBIs analysts calculate the EORmarket will experience a compound average growth rate (CAGR) of 63% per year overthe 6-year span to total $1.3 trillion in 2015.Solar Technology - Weve all seen the solar panels on residential home roofs andtoday energy providers are multiplying this concept by installing large solar farms andusing concentrated solar power (CSP) technology to supplement power demands.Electricity from CSP technology is generated like conventional electricity, except solarpower is used to heat the boiler instead of fossil fuels. Global CSP installations are justgetting started and SBI Energy expects to see real growth in the segment beginning in2012.CSP is the fastest growing segment within the solar technologies, going from $0.7billion in 2010 to $3 billion in 2014, a CAGR of 42% for the period. Including systemsand panels, SBI Energy sees the world solar market growing to $173 billion in 2014 - aCAGR of 28%.Offshore Wind Farms - Coastal area will have a new view as nations increasinglyharness the renewable energy generated by the fierce winds a few miles off theirshorelines. During the next five years, SBI Energy expects offshore wind farms to cropup at a much faster pace than land-based turbines. Leading manufacturers of turbinesand components are riding the wave of production expected to result from growinginterest in offshore projects, such as the recent approvals of Cape Wind in
  • 5. Massachusetts and The Offshore Wind Economic Development Act in New Jersey.Helping them accelerate their offshore initiatives are government cash and taxincentives that promote renewable energy development, particularly in Europe and theU.S. "States are leading the way in off-shore wind development because it spurseconomic development, helps to stabilize energy costs, and moves our country towardsenergy independence in a sustainable fashion," comments Donald Carcieri Governor ofRhode Island. SBI Energy forecasts the global market to grow at a five-year CAGR rateof 11% to reach more than $78 billion. The fastest growth will come from the U.K.,which will more than double its offshore market value to reach nearly $5 billion in 2015.Electric Vehicles - For years the marketing and advertising from government and carcompanies alike have boldly stated that electric cars will take over the car industry “realsoon now.” Now, electric vehicles, in the form of hybrids that combine both gas andelectric motors, are finally beginning to do just that. The world populace is acceptinghybrid electric vehicles, giving them equal weight as an option in their car purchases.Just how quickly this market will grow depends on several factors including gas prices,government incentives and vehicle price. According to market research from SBIEnergy worldwide hybrid electric vehicle sales will double from just under 700,000 unitssold in 2009 to 1.5 million passenger hybrid vehicles sold in 2014. Exponential HEVmarket growth will occur in smaller existing markets such as Europe, Australia andSouth Korea, and in new markets such as India and China where product sold willincrease from 95,000 vehicles in 2010 to 440,000 vehicles in 2014, a phenomenal 47%compound annual growth rate.Smart Grid Technologies - Implementing and integrating all of the renewable energiesis somewhat contingent on the upgrade of our existing dilapidated 100 year oldelectrical grid to a powerful sophisticated smart grid system. The smart grid can be seenin broad outline as an architectonic structure consisting of three major sectors: gridinfrastructure; information and communications technology (ICT); and applications andsoftware (A/S). Despite consumer concerns over privacy and cost regulation, the smartgrid will encourage clean energy production and ensure reliable electrical supply to theworld through digital grid operation and a distributed network. SBI Energy sees theglobal smart grid market soaring upward nearly 150% between 2009 and 2014,reaching $171 billion in 2014. Meanwhile, the U.S. market is projected to double overthe timeframe to about $43 billion by 2014.SBI Reports has been leading industrial market research reporting for more than adecade. The brand established SBI Energy to address the complex nature of theEnergy and Resources industry. SBI Energy reports capture data vital to emergingenergy market sectors on a global scale. Growth of energy technology, manufacturing,construction, transportation and investment is exciting in its innovations andopportunities, and integral to the advancement of security and science. SBI relies upononly the most experienced analysts with excellent credentials, years of industryexperience, and the trust of colleagues and peers.Research for this article is based on the following market studies from SBI Energy:
  • 6. EOR Enhanced Oil Recovery WorldwideElectric Vehicle (EV) and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) Markets WorldwideSmart Grid and ConsumersGlobal Green Building Materials and Construction, 2nd Editionp>Offshore Wind Farm Manufacturing WorldwideU.S. Solar Energy Market World Data, 2nd Edition: PV, Solar Thermal, CSPTable of ContentsChapter 1: Executive Summary Research Methodology The Global Solar Panel Market Figure 1-1: World Solar Panel Market, 2006-2009 (in billion $) The U.S. Solar Market PV Cell & Module Shipments in the U.S Figure 1-2: Annual U.S. PV Shipments, 2004-2009 (in million dollars) Table 1-1: Annual U.S. Shipments of PV Cells & Modules by Type, 2004-2008 (in KW) PV Installations in the U.S. The U.S. Solar Thermal Market Figure 1-3: U.S. Annual Solar Thermal Panel Shipments, 2004-2009 (in million $) Rest of World PV Market The Global CSP Market Table 1-2: U.S. Annual CSP Shipments, 2004-2008 Solar Systems Sales in the U.S. U.S. Imports & Exports of Solar Products Forecast Figure 1-4: World Solar Panel Market Forecast, 2010-2014 (in billion $) U.S. Solar Forecast Figure 1-5: U.S. Solar Market Forecast, 2010-2014 (in billion $) PV Cells & Modules will Dominate the U.S. Solar Panel Market Figure 1-6: U.S. PV Cell & Module Shipment Forecast, 2010-2014 (in billion $) The Top PV Manufacturers 2009 Takes its Toll(ing) U.S. PV Manufacturers Top Solar Thermal Manufacturers Solar Industry Installation & Shipment Trends Figure 1-7: World Cumulative Installed PV, 2004-2009 (in MW) Crystalline Silicon PV Still Controls the Market
  • 7. Figure 1-8: World PV Shipments by Type, 2008 (in percentage) Trends in Germany Trends in Japan Trends in China U.S. Shipment Demographics Grid-Tied Commercial Covers Almost Half the U.S. PV Market California is King for PV Shipments U.S. Solar Thermal Shipment Demographics Solar Manufacturing Trends Figure 1-9: World PV Production by Country, 2008 (in percentage) U.S. Manufacturing Demographics Solar Production Costs Figure 1-10: Average U.S. PV Cell & Module Prices, 2004-2008 (in $/W) Financing Trends Solar Financing in the U.S. Lukewarm Federal Support for Solar Installations Private investment in the U.S. Solar Market World Government Solar PV Incentives Technology Trends Solar Research in the U.S The Solar Distribution Chain U.S. Solar Sales Through the Distribution Chain Figure 1-11: Distribution of PV Cells & Modules by Customer Type, 2005-2008 (in percentage) Manufacturers Become Integrators & Installers Distribution and Dealer/Installers Table 1-4: Top Five California Installers, 2009 Top Inverter and Balance-of-System Providers Inverter Manufacturers Other BOS Manufacturers Silicon Manufacturers Potential Silicon OversupplyChapter 2: Solar Products/Systems Scope of Study: All Solar Systems and Products Study Focus Primarily on the Photovoltaic Market Research Methodology Note on Abbreviations Distributed vs. Centralized GenerationPhotovoltaic Systems From PV Cell to Module Silicon Photovoltaic Technologies Monocrystalline and Polycrystalline Silicon Cells Mono More Efficient Than Poly Boules, Blocks, and “Kerf” The String Ribbon Method Standard Crystal Silicon Cell Processing
  • 8. Thin Film PV Cells Thin Film Attributes and Drawbacks CdTe Technology the Cheapest PV Technology Available Amorphous Silicon (a-Si) CIGS Thin Films, BIPV, and Durability Other PV System Components PV Systems: On-Grid vs. Off-Grid The Most Important On-Grid Component: Inverters Batteries & Charge Controllers Mounts/RacksSolar Thermal Systems Solar Water Heating Systems Flat-Plate Collectors Vacuum tube Collectors Solar Water Heating: Low vs. Medium Temperature Solar Heating Systems: Active and Passive Active Water Heating Systems Passive Water Heating Systems Swimming Pool Systems Solar Air Systems Solar Cooling SystemsConcentrating Solar Power (CSP) CSP Basics CSP vs. Conventional PV CSP So Far Limited to Desert Settings Dishes, Troughs, and Power TowersChapter 3: The Market A Note on the Data The Global Solar Panel Market Figure 3-1: World Solar Panel Market, 2006-2009 (in billion $) The Tumultuous PV Market Almost Misses a Step Figure 3-2: World Installed PV by Year, 2004-2009 (in MW) Crystalline Silicon PV Still Controls the Market Figure 3-3: World PV Shipments by Type, 2008 (in percentage) U.S. Fighting to Remain a Top PV Market Figure 3-4: Annual U.S. PV Shipments, 2004-2009 (in million dollars) PV Shipments in the U.S. Figure 3-5: U.S. Annual Shipments of PV Cells & Modules, 2004-2009 (in MW) Table 3-1: Annual U.S. Shipments of PV Cells & Modules by Type, 2004-2008 (in KW) Table 3-2: Annual U.S. Shipments of PV Cells & Modules by Type, 2004-2008 (in million dollars) PV Installations in the U.S. Figure 3-6: U.S. Installed PV per Year, 2004-2009 (in MW) Rest of World PV Market
  • 9. Germany Regains the Top PV Market Slot Figure 3-7: Annual PV Installations in Germany, 2004-2009 (in MW) Figure 3-8: PV Installations in Germany by Month, 2009 (in MW) Japan and Italy Beat the U.S. in PV Installations in 2009 Figure 3-9: Annual PV Installations in Japan & Italy, 2004-2009 (in MW) The Global Solar Thermal Market Holds a Steady Temperature Figure 3-10: World Solar Thermal Installations by Year, 2006-2008 (in GW) Figure 3-11: U.S. Annual Solar Thermal Panel Shipments, 2004-2009 (MW) Figure 3-12: U.S. Annual Solar Thermal Panel Shipments, 2004-2009 (in million $) The Global CSP Market Table 3-3: U.S. Annual CSP Shipments, 2004-2008 Solar Systems Sales in the U.S. Figure 3-13: U.S. Solar Systems Market, 2004-2009 (in million $) Imports & Exports of Solar Products Key PV Manufacturing Countries Figure 3-14: World PV Production by Country, 2008 (in percentage) U.S. Imports and Exports of PV Cells and Modules Table 3-4: U.S. Annual PV Imports & Exports, 2004-2009 (in million $) Table 3-5: U.S. Annual PV Imports & Exports by Type, 2004-2008 (in kW) Figure 3-15: Top U.S. Import & Export countries, 2008 (in MW) U.S. Imports and Exports of ST Panels Table 3-6: U.S. Annual Solar Thermal Imports & Exports, 2004-2008 (in thousands of square feet)Market Drivers & Forecast Other External Factors That Favor Growth in the Solar Market The Economy: NRE Prices and Supplies Ecology: Climate Change Politics: National Security Internal Factors Favoring Growth Benefits of Solar Systems Negative Growth Factors in the Solar Market Expensive Price Systems Affordability FITs and the bubble effect Government Involvement Legal/Regulatory Issues Utility Obstacles Recovering from the Recession Forecast Figure 3-16: World Solar Panel Market Forecast, 2010-2014 (in billion $) U.S. Solar Forecast Figure 3-17: U.S. Solar Market Forecast, 2010-2014 (in billion $) Figure 3-18: U.S. ST & CSP Market Forecast, 2010-2014 (in million $) PV Cells & Modules will Dominate the U.S. Solar Panel Market Figure 3-19: U.S. PV Cell & Module Shipment Forecast, 2010-2014 (in billion $)
  • 10. Figure 3-20: U.S. PV Installations Forecast, 2010-2014 (MW) Solar Thermal Moves Away from Low Temperature Figure 3-21: U.S. Solar Thermal Collector Shipments Forecast, 2010-2014 (in million $) The CSP Segment is Going to Ignite Figure 3-22: U.S. CSP Collector Shipment Forecast, 2010-2014 (in million $)Chapter 4: Competitors The Top PV Manufacturers Table 4-1: Top Ten PV Cell & Module Manufacturers, 2009 (in MW) 2009 Takes its Toll(ing) Mergers & Acquisitions First Solar Overview Performance Figure 4-1: First Solar Revenue, 2005-2009 (in million dollars) Figure 4-2: First Solar’s Regional Revenue, 2009 (in percentage) Products & Production Figure 4-3: First Solar CdTe Thin-Film Production & Production Capacity, 2005- 2012 (in MW) Significant Developments Suntech Overview Performance Figure 4-4: Suntech Revenue, 2005-2009 (in million dollars) Products & Production Table 4-2: Suntech PV Products, 2010 Figure 4-5: Suntech Production & Production Capacity, 2005-2009 (in MW) Significant Developments Q-Cells Overview Performance Figure 4-6: Q-Cells Revenue & Income, 2005-2009 (in millions of euro) Products & Production Table 4-3: Q-Cells PV Products, 2010 Significant Developments Sharp Overview Performance Figure 4-7: Sharp Solar Segment Revenue, 2005-2009 (in billion yen) Products & Production Table 4-4: Sharp PV Products, 2010 SunPower Overview Performance Figure 4-8: SunPower Corporation’s Revenue by Business Segment, 2005-2009 (in million $)
  • 11. Products & Production Table 4-5: SunPower U.S. PV Products, 2010 Significant Developments Other U.S. PV Manufacturers Figure 4-9: U.S. Manufacturers & Importers of PV Cell & Module Shipments, 2005-2008 (in number of companies) Crystalline Silicon PV Manufacturers Table 4-6: Selected List of U.S Crystalline Silicon PV Cell & Module Manufacturers, 2010 Thin-Film PV Manufacturers Table 4-7: Selected List of U.S Thin-Film PV Module Manufacturers, 2010Top Solar Thermal Manufacturers Himin Sangle Solar Energy GREENoneTEC U.S. Solar Thermal Manufacturers Table 4-8: Selected List of U.S. Solar Thermal Manufacturers, 2010Chapter 5: Solar Industry Trends Solar Still a Niche Market in World Electricity Generation Figure 5-1: U.S. Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 2008 (in percentage) On-Grid Systems Coming On-Stream Worldwide, Lagging in the U.S. Figure 5-2: Cumulative World On-Grid & Off-Grid PV Installations, 1992-2008 (as percentage of total PV installations) Taking Advantage of Off-Grid PV SystemsInstallation & Shipment Trends U.S. PV Shipment Demographics Table 5-1: Domestic U.S. PV Shipments by End Use, 2007-2008 (in MW) Figure 5-3: U.S. Installations by System Size, 2008 (in percentage) Grid-Tied Commercial Covers Almost Half the U.S. PV Market Figure 5-4: Domestic U.S. PV Shipments by Market Sector, 2008 (in percentage) Table 5-2: Domestic U.S. PV Shipments by Market Sector, 2007-2008 (in MW) California is King for PV Shipments Figure 5-5: U.S. Domestic PV Shipments by Destination, 2008 (in kW) Table 5-3: Domestic U.S. PV Shipments by State, 2007-2008 (in MW) U.S. Solar Thermal Shipment Demographics Table 5-4: Domestic U.S. ST Shipments by Market Sector, 2007-2008 (in thousand square feet) Table 5-5: Domestic U.S. ST Shipments by End Use, 2007-2008 (in thousand square feet) Table 5-6: Domestic U.S. ST Shipments by State, 2007-2008 (in thousand square feet) World Solar Installation & Shipment Trends Figure 5-6: World Cumulative Installed PV, 2004-2009 (in MW) Germany Figure 5-7: German PV Installations by Market Sector, 2008 (in percentage) Japan
  • 12. Figure 5-8: Domestic Japanese PV Shipments by Market Sector, 2009 (in MW) China World CSP Trends Table 5-7: Current & Future CSP Facilities, 2010Solar Manufacturing Trends U.S. Manufacturing Demographics Figure 5-9: U.S. Photovoltaic Cell & Module Manufacturing by State, 2007-2008 (in MW) Figure 5-10: U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Companies, 2007-2008 (in number of companies) ST Manufacturing Demographics Figure 5-11: U.S. Solar Thermal Industry Companies, 2007-2008 (in number of companies) World Solar Manufacturing Trends Solar Production Costs Figure 5-12: Average U.S. PV Cell & Module Prices, 2004-2008 (in $/W) Figure 5-13: Average U.S. ST Collector Prices, 2004-2008 (in $/sq. ft.)Financing Trends Solar Financing in the U.S. Table 5-8: State Financial Incentives for Solar PV & Solar Heating, 2010 U.S. States Picking up the PACE Figure 5-14: PACE and Loan Availability for Solar Projects by State, 2010 Solar Support Growing Within State Policies Table 5-9: State RPS Policies with Solar/DG Provisions, 2010 Lukewarm Federal Support for Solar Installations Private investment in the U.S. Solar Market Rent Your Own Solar electric System World Government Solar Incentives Table 5-10: World PV Feed-In Tariff Rates, 2010Technology Trends Photovoltaic Cell Efficiencies Table 5-11: Top Photovoltaic Cell Efficiencies by Technology, 2010 (in percentage) Solar Research in the U.S. Figure 5-15: U.S. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program Funding, FY2006- FY2010 (in millions $) Thin-film has Come of Age Asian Companies Embrace Hybrid TF Variations Few Challengers in CdTe CIGS Is Where the Action Is Thin-film Promise Thin-film Problems Emerging PV Alternatives Hybrid Cells Organic Cells Color-Sensitive Cells
  • 13. Metallurgical Silicon Quantum DotsChapter 6: The Solar Supply & Distribution Chain The Distribution Chain of the Solar Market U.S. Solar Sales Through the Distribution Chain Figure 6-1: Distribution of PV Cells & Modules by Customer Type, 2005-2008 (in percentage) Figure 6-2: Distribution of ST Collectors by Customer Type, 2005-2008 (in percentage) Manufacturers Become Integrators & Installers Figure 6-3: U.S. PV Manufacturers/Importers Providing Installation Services, 2005-2008 (in number of companies) The Drive to Value-Add: Distributors Table 6-1: Selected List of U.S Solar Distributors, 2010 Distribution and Dealer/Installers Table 6-2: Top Five California Installers, 2009 Distribution and Direct-Sales Retailers System Designers Systems Integrators Table 6-3: Selected List of U.S. Solar Systems Integrators, 2010Top Inverter and Balance-of-System Providers Inverter Manufacturers Table 6-4: Selected List of U.S. Solar Market Competitors: Inverters, 2010 Other BOS Manufacturers Table 6-5: Selected List of U.S. Solar Market Competitors: Charge Controllers, 2010 Table 6-6: Selected List of U.S. Solar Market Competitors: Batteries, 2010 Table 6-7: Selected List of U.S. Solar Market Competitors: Mounts/Racks, 2010Silicon Manufacturers Leading Silicon Producers Potential Silicon OversupplyAppendix: Selected Addresses of Solar Marketers PV Cell/Module Marketers Solar Thermal Manufacturers Inverter/BOS ManufacturersAvailable immediately for Online Download athttp://www.marketresearch.com/product/display.asp?productid=2385474US: 800.298.5699UK +44.207.256.3920
  • 14. Intl: +1.240.747.3093Fax: 240.747.3004